Which tools do I use to turn this bolt in a tight space?


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I've been unable to level my fridge because one of the adjustable feet has been screwed right up into a recess in a hinge, and I can't get any tools at it. I can only move it a few degree with my fingers, and it just won't budge. The difficultly with a fridge is that I can't lean it over too far to get at the bottom, as the wrong fluids might mix together. There's a possibility I can turn the bolt from the top (which is has some kind of tight rubber cap in the way) , but this involves keeping the freezer door open, which I don't want to do for too long. What can I use to turn the bolt from the threaded part in a tight space, without damaging the threads?
 

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We're putting in a lot of effort to renovate the kitchen, and I couldn't accept that bunging some ugly stuff underneath! My neighbour suggested putting some WD40 on it and leave it overnight, and that did the trick. I was able to turn it with my fingers once I lifted the front of the fridge up a bit. I didn't realise the the moisture from the freezer must have rusted the bolt in place.
 
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Didn't mean to come off as rude, Colin, thanks for responding. It was so frustrating when I was trying to do the simple job of turning a bolt that was staring right at me but couldn't understand why it wouldn't budge. Putting something underneath seemed like a 'hack', and not the proper way to do it, as nothing was broken. Got it sorted in the end. I don't think the fridge has the best design where the foot can get 'trapped' in the recess when tightened too far and placed in a spot that gets moisture from the freezer.
 
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Hi,

Thanks for your reply urbanstarship. I too dislike bodges but I was thinking of a neat packing to blend in being unnoticeable making it a simple fix.

I'm pleased though you got it sorted; these small jobs as you rightly say can be highly frustrating.

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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Never underestimate the damage a fridge or freezer can do.
A neighbour of mine discovered his kitchen floor was getting a bit springy.
I took the vinyl sheet flooring up for him and underneath, the 22-mm chipboard sub-floor had turned into crumbly black compost.
The cause? The supposed frost-free water reservoir on the back was blocked with crap, and the water got under the vinyl.
Add in the boiler heating pipes and it slowly steamed itself to an expensive death.
 
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Hello Colin
When you say packing, I know what you mean.
An engineer might refer to shims.
Looking at the picture, the fridge or whatever probably came with an adjusting spanner.
Loads of ways to turn that. Narrow jaw Moles, pump pliers, even a punch or old screwdriver to gently tap on one of the points.
Colin never worked for Bodgit and Scarper, well known tradespeople.
 
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The difficultly with a fridge is that I can't lean it over too far to get at the bottom, as the wrong fluids might mix together.
For your or other people's possible future info:

If you empty the appliance and remove shelves and doors, you can lay it on its side if you want. You do need to let it stand upright for a while before turning it back on - at least as long as it was on its side for, with probably a minimum of 4 hours - research it if you actually need to do it.
 
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Hi,

Thanks piglet11. :)

You mentioning tapping a screwdriver with an hammer on one of the points takes me back to when I was 15 in 1962 as an apprentice mechanical engineer in the pit; my basic tools supplied by the NCB included a 2Lb ball/pein hammer head and I had to make my own shaft. I was one of two mechanical apprentices and both now having got our hammers sorted out we were set on scrapping steel pit tubs; we sure cut through many nuts using our hammer and cold chisel; we were also taught blacksmithing so could reshape and sharpen our cold chisels. Having reached the age of 16 we could then be taught how to use oxy/acetylene equipment but the NCB was very safety concious and I was sent on a 6 month training course covering hand tools and machines this included oxy/acetylene and arc welding together with using an oxy/acetylene burner.

Back at the pit now having burning gear we got stuck into some serious scrapping but I've since often used the hammer and cold chisel on wayward nuts cutting right through them; it gives both arms a good workout.

I mentioned packing rather than shims as a general description but both terms amount to the same thing although in engineering shims are usually of metal at very accurate thicknesses; replying to questions it can be difficult understanding what skills are involved or even workshop kit if any.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shim_(spacer)

Even the most simple question can quickly become complicated. ;)

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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Hi Colin
Depends on the trade.
Window and kitchen fitters use packing pieces, an engine re-builder would probably ask for a shim.
I know you know the difference, I was just chucking it in.
I doubt that a wobbly fridge would need anything as accurate as a shim.
I've got a set of different coloured window packers that come in handy for all sorts of jobs.
Better than bits of cardboard.
Cheers
 
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Hi,

Thanks piglet11; I couldn't agree with you more; suppliers like Screwfix sell lots of plastic packing pieces for jobs like installing window frames; Screwfix even call these shims; these will be the type you describe and yes much better than cardboard;

https://www.screwfix.com/p/broadfix-plastic-shims-large-101-x-10-x-43mm-200-pack/55267

Just to complicate things as I'm sure you know metal shims are used a great deal in industry such as these;

https://www.grainger.com/category/r...c24ba5052e1b14d37f1bc58fe228fb1f&gclsrc=3p.ds

I recently made and installed a wooden framed porch and to align it I used sliding wooden wedges cut on my bandsaw and again I bet you've often done this.

To level domestic appliances if they have round feet suitable washers can be pressed into service and never be noticed unless looking for them; neatness is important as in this case where urbanstarship wants to do a top job; good on him for not bodging.

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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Any use?

Thin jaws, and jaws open really wide, should assist in grabbing the foot of the adjuster?

Sols as " pump gland spanners" or similar. handy tool for grabbing is a tight space?


Ken
 
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FWIW, Speaking of shims. I always keep the credit card offers I get in the mail. Lots of different thicknesses. They work great as shims, light duty putty knives or non scratching scraper.
 
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