Projects require tools and materials.

Discussion in 'Your DIY and Workshop Projects' started by Retired, Aug 4, 2018.

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    Retired

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    Hi,

    Once again today was Rufforth Auto Jumble day; this is the first Saturday of every month and weather permitting I look forward to attending. Rufforth is near York but it's possible similar events are run elsewhere; I know there is an enormous jumble held in Newark but it's a bit far for me to attend; it's commonly called "Normous Newark" due to its size.

    I met up with my best friend David at Rufforth this morning and we enjoyed wandering around looking for urgent items we needed but didn't know about. I arrived on site at 6:50 and David arrived at 8:30. By the time David arrived I was on my fourth trip back to the car with more goodies.

    For anyone who can attend one of these jumbles they are a goldmine for tools and materials; much of the tooling is old stock but of superior quality to the rubbish now often sold at high prices; I'm happy to show what I came away with this morning whilst I was £109 lighter in the pocket; I got real value and am delighted with the items I brought home. Here's the list for interest with prices; I hope these low prices don't bring tears to your eyes Ian?

    Pair of very old electric coach lamps seen in a big cardboard box on the ground at the side of a stall; both for £4? I was undecided but then the young lady owner said you can have them for £3; they were soon in the car and will make a nice project restoring them; I think they will look excellent wall mounted outside our front door.

    On another stall I saw a pair of heavy duty sash cramps and for years I've always wanted a decent pair; I've a project coming up where I'll need to cramp up a front door so I asked the usual question "how much" these cramps are 50" long and at £20 the pair they too were soon in the car but it was surprising how heavy they became as I carried them to the car.

    Again for the new project I need frame sealant and having wandered around a couple of hours only seeing silicone sealant David spotted more cartridges on a stall; brilliant two cartridges of Acrylic sealant were mine for £3.

    I was amazed to see a tin box containing quite a number of assorted twist drills the price £3; I was even more amazed these hadn't been grabbed earlier so they were mine; included in the assortment was 7mm counterbore which alone if it was new would cost a lot more than £3; the car was loading up nicely.

    The number of times I've needed a pad saw and had to make do wrapping cloth as an handle around an hacksaw blade; I've now got a nice pad saw for the huge sum of £1.

    Many years ago I always wanted an Arkansas honing stone these being regarded as "the best" but their cost was way out of my league; I've now got one costing only £10 in a nice wooden box; I think it's 9" x 2" being a bench stone.

    Knowing I need screws to attach new door frames to the stone wall I bought a box of 100 concrete screws M7.5 x 80 c/sunk £4 the full box.

    5L of WD40 cost me £20; when I bought mine there were at least six of these on the stall; a short while later the lot had been sold; I like WD40 because it's useful stuff to have to hand; spray cans can cost £5 so 5L at £20 is excellent value.

    I like to make my own tools whenever possible and I've been doing quite a bit of woodturning recently; I fancied trying carbide tipped turning tools but not at the new price from a store; there is always a stall run by a young lady who sells all kinds of carbide tips; I asked her if she had any tips suitable for woodturning because these have much sharper edges than those used on metal. I have lots of tips suitable for metal but these are of little use for woodturning; WOW from the back of the stall she said she was often asked for tips suitable for woodturning and what shape tip would I like? I replied 1/2" dia which she didn't have but she had plenty of 12mm plus some smaller diameter tips; these tips are £3.50 each; I bought a pack of ten for £30; she then said woodturners also buy pointed tips from her and she showed me one; I bought 3 of these for £10. I had taken along a selection of my metal cutting tips with the intention of buying locating screws; I bought five assorted screws at £5 for the five.

    I bought three plastic tubes of a kind I've never seen before from the plastic box stall; the young lady said these were actually for documents the smaller size being A4; Bron has lots of artists pencils and paint brushes so I bought two small and one large; these tubes are threaded in the middle and unscrew; on the same stall I bought sealable plastic bags suitable for Bron's cards she enjoys making; each pack costing only £1 so I bought five packs which should last a while.

    At 11:30 David and I parted heading home but what a most enjoyable morning; entry to Rufforth is only £2 and fuel for the Yeti about £12.

    Plastics; aluminium and steel stock; tools of all kinds; chainsaws; mowers; top quality drill bits; taps and dies even an industrial Karcher floor cleaner which would cost a great deal of money new; it's all on sale; car refinishing products such as body filler and paint plus spray guns and panel beating tools; power tools of every description they are all there.

    It was David who introduced me to Rufforth about ten years ago and I believe David has visited Rufforth since 1995; it's like a candy store to a child.

    Did I say I like visiting Rufforth Auto Jumble? :D

    Here's some pictures of what I bought.

    Kind regards, Colin.

    DSC00834.JPG
    50" sash cramps.

    DSC00835.JPG
    My selection of useful goodies.

    DSC00836.JPG
    How many novices would jump at the chance of these quality drill bits the whole lot for a mere £3.

    DSC00837.JPG
    Carbide cutters suitable for woodturning; £3.50 each but I paid £30 for the pack of ten.

    DSC00838.JPG
    These two coach lamps grabbed my attention and at £3 the pair I grabbed them.

    DSC00839.JPG

    7mm counterbore found in the tin of drill bits.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2018
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    Ian Administrator

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    Wow, you really did get some bargains there. Those sash cramps are HUGE - I bought one about half of that size for the same price you paid for both! They look solid too.

    Looks like it would be a great place to stock up on tooling. I just wish I had a bigger workshop, as I'm bursting at the seams already (and I've still got to get that micro lathe in :D).

    It looks like there are AutoJumbles held very close to me in Knutsford, but I'm not able to make the one later this month. I've bookmarked this page (https://motoringevents.net/autojumble.htm) so I can see when the next one comes up. I think I'm going to have to limit how much cash I take with me, so I don't go overboard ;).
     
    Ian, Aug 5, 2018
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    Hi,

    Thanks Ian. Yes the sash cramps are big and they are certainly heavy duty; these are made to last many lifetimes being made many years ago without skimping on metal. :)

    Rufforth is a top place to stock up on tooling without breaking the bank; there's usually at least one stall where top quality brand new drill bits; reamers; tool bits can be bought at a fair price; I buy packs of top quality such as Dormer drill bits in tens; the price varies with size of bit but not all sizes need to be bought at once; I've been attending Rufforth for years so to pick up a couple of packs of drill bits on each visit soon builds up a nice selection. There is a very big indoor stall where all manner of high quality drill bits and files are on sale at cheap prices; David and I call this the Aerospace stall because most of the items are Aerospace stock; the guy running the stall is a real character with a loud voice saying who's got some money for me? There is usually a vast amount of Bergen tools on sale; I bought a nice big US Pro socket set a few years ago; screws of every description in full boxes or bags from £1 per bag; for anyone with an home workshop Rufforth is as good as a gold mine; even an ice cream can be bought near the toilets and Rufforth is recorded as selling the best bacon butties ever. You'll always find space for decent tooling Ian.:D

    Thanks for posting the Jumble links; its interesting to see so many; I'd like to visit Normous Newark but it's a fair trek from home; Rufforth is just a nice run out at 40 miles each way.

    Spoil yourself Ian and take plenty of cash with you because otherwise you're sure to see something you'd die to own only to see someone else walk away with it; one thing I quickly learned was not to dither around; if I see something I fancy I grab it otherwise it will be gone; I used to haggle over prices but for a while now I've not bothered; the stallholders are there to make a decent profit and if they don't they won't turn up again; one thing I dislike are stalls where nothing is clearly priced; I tend to avoid these.

    Out of interest I browsed eBay looking for coach lamps of the type I bought yesterday; I just knew these were worth a bit but at £85 for a single rough lamp or on another sale two lamps for £100 I think I got a huge bargain paying only £3 for the pair I now have and mine have fancy glass windows.

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
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    Ian Administrator

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    Oooh... aerospace stall you say? I'm an aerospace engineer, so anything like that is right up my street :D. I may have to pay this place a visit one day!

    That lamp is a steal of a bargain, £3 won't get you much these days - so for a pair of lamps that is incredible.
     
    Ian, Aug 6, 2018
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    Hi,

    Yes Ian; the guy occupies about three stalls with tables full of top quality files; drill bits; handles etc; he even has left hand drill bits and solid cobalt types all at very fair prices; he says these are Aerospace and I believe him. On one visit I was buying files and this guy showed me a way of testing what is a good or poor file; he picked up a large "second cut" flat file blade and near the top by the tang he placed a 2p coin face down then tilted the file and I was impressed by how far he could tilt the file before the 2p slid off; he said visit the other stalls selling files and try this test? I bought a file made specifically for filing aluminium and it does an amazing job; this file brand new without handle I believe only cost £3; on Saturday my chum David bought two of these files; wooden file handles start at £1 each. He also sells a few abrasives. Take plenty of money with you and stock up.

    There is usually another stall run by a coloured guy and I've bought many ten pack drill bits from him these too being top quality like Dormer but this guy also sells all manner of engineering items like reamers; chucks; measuring equipment; Rufforth Auto Jumble is held the first Saturday of every month; I always attend weather permitting but I no longer visit during winter months because it being an old WW2 airfield it gets really bleak and with the big hanger doors open it can be a lot colder inside the hanger than browsing outside stalls. I used to visit in snow and on one occasion the kiosk where entry fees are taken there must have been 4" deep water; I thanked the guy for washing the wheels of my car; I now leave such conditions to the more hardy; I'm approaching the age to dodge pneumonia?

    I always take along a wish list but I also keep my eyes open for the bargains like the two coach lamps; there is also a stall in the hanger selling all kinds of auto paint even cellulose to match a lot of vehicle colours; another really big stall sells lots of bodywork kit and all manner of polishing tooling and buffing pads etc; I could go on forever but if ever you are in the area Ian I can highly recommend you visit but please be aware its highly addictive; one visit is never enough; I've been visiting for years; rather than explain in text I'll try to take pictures of the stalls I'm describing next month and post the pictures.?

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
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    Hi,

    Many useful items can be made in a home workshop costing very little indeed; Years ago I made a pair of short sash cramps as seen in the picture below. These are made from heavy gauge 2" angle iron and are extremely strong; I had this angle iron to hand so these two cramps cost me nothing. A bit of metal cutting; drilling; tapping and welding didn't take forever to do; I've used these many times and am using them again today.

    If I were to make more I would position the cramping screw directly above the "V" of the angle iron allowing the new cramp to sit without being supported rather like a triangle.

    An arc welder of 140A doesn't cost much but is a real asset to own; I've never used Mig or Tig welders always just relying on my arc (stick) welders. A couple of years ago I upgraded my SIP 140A arc welder to an industrial Oxford 180A oil cooled arc welder; this doesn't have a duty cycle it will weld day in day out without fuss but obviously it cost quite a bit of money and no way can I lift it; it will run from either 3 phase or single phase but it needs at least a "C" type mcb on 240V otherwise on power up it trips a standard "B" type mcb; 140A arc welders can be run from a 13A plug. I've been using arc welders for the last 55 years and still enjoy welding.

    Kind regards, Colin.

    DSC00869.JPG
     
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    Ian Administrator

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    They look very solidly made! Nice to be able to make your own cramps as needed :D.

    Would you recommend an arc welder for a novice? I see that Toolstation are selling them for ~£60. Occasionally I have sheet metal that I'd like to join, or simple brackets that I'd like to fabricate - so a welding kit has been at the back of my mind for a while. My previous welding experience is minimal.
     
    Ian, Aug 9, 2018
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    Hi,

    Thanks Ian. Sheet metal is a no go for an arc welder it would end up full of holes; I can weld thin metal but dislike doing it; I would highly recommend an arc welder to a novice though for welding 1/8" (3mm) thick or above.

    The toolstation welder you mention I have no experience of but its specification is very low at only 45/100A; I wonder how it would cope with its maximum 2.5mm rod?

    For a little more money I can personally recommend a SIP Weldmate;

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SIP-0574...445912&hash=item3cf9c9263c:g:piEAAOSwfjRaAxC6

    I owned one of these SIP's for over 20 years and it did well for me; if I really pushed it I had to wait about half an hour for it to cool down due to it's overheat protection; I used to get everything ready for welding before switching it on then complete the welds switching it back off; this worked for me and it seldom cut out; I never left it switched on whilst I spent time setting up or making adjustments. This will take 3.2mm rods (electrodes) but for general use I like a 2.5mm rod (6013) The rods from Screwfix are cheap and do a decent job; better to buy a pack like this and as a bonus the rods come in a nice plastic container; rods need to be kept dry.

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/impax-e6013-2-5-welding-electrodes-2-5-x-350mm-2-5kg/17503#_=p

    I've welded rusty car exhausts years ago with my arc welder but I've had lots of practice. Angle iron is good to practice on and a novice will soon grasp the basics; beware though regarding safety; ARC EYE is very common and this happens when the arc is viewed without dark lens; the rod tends to stick for a novice who then panics and removes the face shield whilst trying to break the rod clear resulting in a blinding flash; I bought an automatic welding helmet costing around £35 and this avoids ARC EYE but I still prefer the hand shield for the welding I do possibly because it's habit more than anything. Never weld near anything that will burn and a novice quickly learns how hot the metal gets. I ensure all my skin is also protected from the arc and heavy gloves are a must; I have a brand new pair of welding gloves but I prefer the common rigger gloves which I always have kicking around.

    I like the SIP Weldmate because it's a good solid machine; I've seen lots of modern "Inverter" welders such as this for sale but I've no experience of them and being electronic I doubt I'd trust them?

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/200AMP-W...845764?hash=item33ea379ec4:g:a2wAAOSwc95a87hx

    I was taught to weld on big industrial 3 phase oil cooled welders like the Oxford and for years I wanted an Oxford; a couple of years ago I bought my 180A Oxford and gave my SIP to a friend as a prezzie.

    If you really only want to weld thin stuff Ian then I'd recommend you look into MIG welders which are suited to such work but I can't offer any advice on these because I've never used one. I once read that anyone who can use an arc welder would find using a MIG a doddle?

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
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    Ian Administrator

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    Many thanks for the info Colin :). It sounds like it may be better for me to go down the MIG route - it looks like these units are reasonably priced too. I've also had good experience with SIP, some of my current air tools are by them.

    Time for me to watch some YouTube tutorials and see if I can remember how it works :D.
     
    Ian, Aug 10, 2018
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    Hi,

    You're welcome Ian. If you intend to weld thin gauge sheet steel such as used in car bodywork then yes the MIG is the welder for you; I know little of MIG welders but I believe some use gas bottles some don't; the price of these gas bottles will bring tears to your eyes;

    https://www.machinemart.co.uk/p/co2...SMTLFYRYr-cNbvHxYUqRBoaUBpjBVZlEaAkVBEALw_wcB

    Here's a YouTube video you might find of interest showing gasless MIG welding;



    Here's a guy running a cheap MIG and please note near the end of the video he's already in trouble due to the overload kicking in.



    Here's another video showing a novice using a MIG for the first time; obviously with practice welds will improve no end but one thing I find puzzling is why this guy is trying to weld the angle iron with a gap at the joint when all he had to do was to either clamp or even place something heavy on the angle to close the joint but then most novices tend to miss the obvious.



    Watch lots of YouTube videos Ian and look at reviews before parting with money; I seldom weld thin metal and for the last 55 years I've been happy with my arc welders. Many years ago I tried using a "Carbon arc torch" where two carbon rods are mounted in the torch at an angle almost meeting at a point; the arc is struck between the ends of the rods and these are truly awful things to use. I couldn't control it at all with the arc bouncing around so was glad to dump it.

    https://www.hisltd.co.uk/ProductDet...gemCCKCWMeDTrGtulecm9jjWgn4od1cAaAp9fEALw_wcB

    We are all different though Ian and what suits one might be terrible for another; one thing is certain though practice does make perfect. I was taught welding both Arc and gas (oxy/acetylene) at the National Coal Board training centre; this was an intensive course starting at the very basics; we were taught how to set up brand new BOC Sapphire gas welding and cutting kit. The arc welders were top quality 3 phase Oxford oil cooled welders. I never enjoyed gas welding due to the distortion of the metal but within minutes both I and my colleagues were making wonderful arc welds.

    You could of course buy both a MIG and an arc welder Ian if you have the funds?

    Time I got off my backside and do some woodworking; I need to crank up my machines so I've waited until 9 o'clock not wishing to disturb our neighbours too early; I don't have a problem at all in this respect with neighbours; a bit of consideration goes a long way.

    Good luck Ian with your welding; as I say I only use my arc welder but I do always enjoy welding.

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
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    Hi,

    I'm now on with a woodworking project requiring a number of mortise & tenon joints cutting in 4" x2" and 8" x 2" redwood. I made a tenon cutting jig from offcuts kicking around in the workshop; nothing fancy but it needed to be very accurate so I took plenty of time to get it just right. I always run test pieces and such a piece is seen in the pictures below having its tenon cheeks cut; each cheek is cut at full depth in a single pass and the process is rapid; the dust extractor is hooked up to the saw. Both cheeks can be cut without playing around with the jig; a pair of "stops" secured to the saw ensure once set up all tenons are exactly identical; it works a treat.

    I designed and made the saw bench from scratch and it's a bit of a beast at 4hp single phase; it doesn't have soft start or motor braking coming up to full speed immediately; not a saw for any novice to use or for anyone of a timid disposition.

    Kind regards, Colin.

    New entrance_022.JPG
    Test piece being cut to full depth.

    New entrance_023.JPG
    This saw doesn't take prisoners.

    New entrance_024.JPG
    Operating handle added for my safety; I don't want to make contact with the blade.

    New entrance_025.JPG

    Saw bench designed and made by me; robust construction should last a lifetime or two.
     
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    Hi,

    Here's an abbreviated story of two days misery in the workshop.

    I spent an infuriating two full days trying to make a front door with side panels; I couldn't even make the side panel frames and I was baffled by how badly the joints were turning out. I spent ages making a very accurate jig allowing the big tenons to be cut with my 3hp Makita router but wasn't getting anywhere at all and it was driving me mad; I also tried cutting the tenons using my DeWalt radial arm saw but the harder I tried the worse it became; since buying the RAS a few years ago all I've ever used it for is cross cutting but now as I tried to adjust it's height the arm was binding on the column meaning the arm not only had to be wound up but also wound down making fine adjustment virtually impossible; two days of this torment was enough. I've made many doors over the years but this was something else and on the third day I went right back to basics.


    When the planed redwood arrived the first thing I did was to check it with a square and apart from a slight dish it appeared OK; what I didn't do was to check all around and now I found out this was a huge mistake; the timber is rubbish; the slight dish I could easily live with but turning it over there is a pronounced hump which really caught me out; why did I pay for planed timber when I should have bought sawn timber and planed it myself; what is the point of supplying such rubbish timber; I was extremely annoyed with myself for being caught out like this.


    Whilst using the router and RAS this meant machining the tenon cheeks by turning the timber over and this is where the inaccuracies crept in. Once I realized what was wrong I made the tenon cutting jig for the saw bench enabling just a face side and face edge to be used as reference. I couldn't even run this timber through the planer/thicknesser because this would reduce its size even more. I have a square chisel mortising machine so cutting the mortises is easy enough. I'm used to making jigs and setting machines up but after initially checking for squareness it didn't occur to me this was the problem?


    I've now cut the joints for the door and today visited a different timber yard to buy a bit of timber to replace the rubbish now spoiled; this time I double checked and the guy in this second timber yard wanted to sell me rubbish from the top of the pile; for the 8" wide rails I've biscuit jointed two 4" wide pieces; to use a single 8" wide piece is asking for it to be badly cupped.

    I might look back and laugh at this in ten years time. :mad:

    Kind regards, Colin.

    DSC00861.JPG
    Test piece.

    DSC00863.JPG
    Cutting biscuit slots.

    DSC00864.JPG
    Biscuit slots cut.

    DSC00865.JPG
    For members who wonder what biscuits are.

    DSC00867.JPG
    It sure gets tight in the workshop; ripping a full sheet of ply.

    DSC00870.JPG
    Biscuit joint glued and cramped.

    DSC00871.JPG
    Router jig in action; pity the timber was so bad.

    DSC00874.JPG
    Construction of router jig; with decent timber this would be very accurate indeed.

    DSC00877.JPG

    The dished side of the timber was acceptable when checked; I never expected this on the other side; two days misery because this threw the jigs and machines out. I usually do things the hard way so nothing changes.
     
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    Ian Administrator

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    How frustrating!!! I know the feeling, and could kick myself when an easy check at the start could have saved me a lot of time further down the road - such is the nature of a workshop :D.

    I'd be really interested to see the door when it's finished :).
     
    Ian, Aug 15, 2018
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    Hi,

    Thanks Ian. I've made many doors over the years but never encountered timber as bad as this which really has caused many problems having to hand finish every joint. The first door I made here was actually the first job I did to replace the broken rear exterior rear door; this was handmade 31 years ago and is still as good as new. Here are a few doors I've made.

    Doors_001.JPG
    Front room doors in stained Meranti.

    Doors_002.JPG
    More Meranti doors in the kitchen.

    Doors_003.JPG
    Handmade kitchen again in Meranti.

    Doors_004.JPG
    Rear door handmade 31 years ago; painted redwood still like new.

    Bungalow exterior makeover Aug 2016 (1).JPG

    Side hung garage (workshop) doors in painted redwood.
     
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    Hi,

    Quite a while ago I bought a Record Power square chisel morticer and I'm finally using it. I've previously owned heavy industrial cast iron square chisel morticers and this Record Power is a poor substitute but then it's never meant to be industrial quality so I'm not complaining.

    However its been driving me mad; I need arms like Popeye to adjust the height; the head unit has some side to side play allowing the chisel to deflect; the sliding handle is a torture; adjusting is a pain using the wing nuts but at the price it's unfair to compare with big industrial machines?

    I've been cutting lots of mortices over the last few days and yesterday was the last straw regarding the sliding handle which when released dropped meaning I was forever lifting it up again in order to use it; by the time I got it fully adjusted I could have cut the mortices by hand.

    This morning sick of the handle I decided if I didn't sort it out I'd scrap the thing because it really was starting to wind me up. The pictures below show the solution I came up with which has cured this problem once and for all; I drilled and tapped at 6mm the shaft the handle slides through then lifting the handle up I nipped it tightly with a 6mm set screw; now lets see this handle slide down again.

    Why tolerate something like this when it can be fixed with a bit of thought; once I've completed this current project I'll have a good look at the side play in the head and also look at the wing nut adjusting problem; if I wasn't used to the big morticers perhaps I wouldn't be as unkind to this one but it really has wound me up over the last few days; then again I might just sell the thing because there are easier ways to cut mortices?

    Kind regards, Colin.

    Record morticer_001.JPG
    Let go of the handle (lever) and it drops; this really does annoy.

    Record morticer_002.JPG
    The fiddly wing nut adjusters.

    Record morticer_003.JPG
    Indent added for set screw locking location.

    Record morticer_004.JPG
    Peace at last the handle now remains up when released.

    Record morticer_005.JPG

    A simple solution but it makes a huge difference. I'm never afraid to modify a machine to suit me.
     
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    [​IMG]

    It's been years since I visited a Flea Market. The last few seemed to be peoples actual trash.

    It looks like I need to lookup some bigger markets and start digging through he stalls.

    Anyone know if any good ones in the Southeast US?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 8, 2018
    LT.Son, Sep 6, 2018
    #16
    Retired likes this.
  17. Retired

    imjohnbrown86

    Joined:
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    This thread is very helpful, thanks for sharing your experiences. Will follow the thread.
     
    imjohnbrown86, Nov 8, 2018
    #17
    Retired likes this.
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