Wallpaper


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My walls have a knockdown finish and I want to put some wallpaper up. What is the best way to treat the wall finish before papering?
 
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Hi,

Well said Doug.

After preparing the wall I always wipe over with the palm of my hand just to double check there or no small bumps left.

I always apply lining paper first even if its not needed;


A half filled bucket of clean warm water and an old tea towel for cleaning up. I never use scissors for trimming paper once its hung; once my paper is on the wall it stays on the wall; I trim by gently pushing a 4" filling knife/wallpaper scraper tightly into the joint then carefully run a SHARP utility knife along the scraper on the waste side of the paper moving the scraper along the joint until the cut is completed; take care not to cut fingers; saves having to pull the freshly hung paper away from the wall in order to gain scissor access leaving a strong glue bond and a very neatly cut line. Try both cutting with scissors and using the knife method to see which suits best because we are all different. I use a paperhanging brush for final smoothing to remove air pockets.

Papering ceilings is a bit more difficult but with a bit of practice it gets much easier.

For poor walls then Wallrock comes into its own but it's more expensive and more difficult to apply because it requires hanging with a special strong adhesive;

https://www.wallpaperdirect.com/products/wallrock/wallrock-fibreliner-55-double-roll/68664

I used Wallrock lining paper on both the ceiling and upper walls in our master bedroom because although I ensured ever blemish and crack was filled I didn't want to be going back in a few years to do the job again. With the Wallrock applied I then gave two coats of top quality paint.

I agree with Doug though; have fun wallpapering; take your time and if a mistake is made its not the end of the world it just wastes a length of paper and a drop of paste; I enjoy hanging paper it's the hard graft getting everything ready which takes all the time and effort. One thing a homeowner has is plenty of time unlike a professional decorator who needs to earn a living.

Before I start papering I always paint and finish any trim like skirting boards and architrave.

I'm sure there'll be lots of papering videos on YouTube to help you.

Kind regards, Colin.

lining paper_001.JPG

Our front room receiving a comprehensive makeover nearing completion The walls above dado level are painstaking prepared using lining paper; this paper is heavyweight and because it's being painted the lining paper is hung vertically. I also designed the new fireplace wooden mantle and wall paneling frames making them all in the workshop. A new quality carpet completed the job.

lining paper_002.JPG

Bron and I like stately homes so we decided to install our own coffered ceiling; this is made entirely of 18mm thick MDF; I did the lot including making the mouldings. Very much on topic with this thread I used Wallrock very heavy lining paper with its special adhesive on the ceiling applying this after the woodwork was completed and painted; Each paper panel was cut slightly large then when hung trimmed using the scraper and utility knife; every joint is perfect. I also used the Wallrock on the walls above the wainscot panelling.

lining paper_003.JPG


The coffered ceiling finished; a new light pendant was installed. Just because a job has been done a certain way previously it doesn't mean it can't be changed; I enjoy all aspects of DIY and take great care to do the best possible job I can after all doing the work myself means I can afford to buy best materials having saved a lot of money on labour.

Before getting stuck into papering Johnny may I suggest you consider all the alternatives because a bit of imagination and patience can really work wonders. I'm certainly not a decorator by trade and I detested woodwork at school.

A nicely papered room looks excellent but with a bit of thought it can look outstanding. Visitors to our home are always amazed by how we've transformed it and all because Bron enjoys crafts and I enjoy experimenting.

Something to think about?

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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Hi,

Many thanks andrenanikol. :)

I enjoy leaving my comfort zone; if someone tells me I can't do something I always think because they can't do it I can and enjoy proving them wrong. Our neighbours openly laughed at us 31 years ago when Bron and I told them we were going to replace the leaking roof on our main bungalow and the roof over the rear two roomed extension; I researched how to install a new roof for 18 months whilst we saved the money for the materials. We successfully replaced both roofs then one of the neighbours who had laughed at us found he now needed a new roof and had the cheek to ask if we would do the work for him; we politely declined but I always believe even a raw novice with determination and doing plenty of research up front can do wonderful work to the highest standards. I'm no one special but I'm not scared to have a go at anything; the only way to really fail is not to try?

Forums such as this and YouTube are brilliant in supplying lots of detailed instructions; when I started DIY 42 years ago I started with small projects and as I gained experience and confidence progressed onto bigger projects; I can do plumbing but this is one job I dislike because I don't like playing with water. I've made many mistakes over the years making the same mistake a number of times but I learn from mistakes. The wrong thing to do is to start ripping something big apart then finding its getting out of hand only to pack it in feeling like a failure; I always encourage others to have a go and to leave their comfort zone. A bit of thought and imagination goes a long way; I dug out tons of wet clay removing nine steps up to our bungalow then installed a sloping 42' long pathway; three of our neighbours have now copied this; I installed steelwork erecting a decking to the front of our bungalow; a neighbour is now copying this; of course I'm flattered but why did they copy instead of thinking for themselves? Anyway back to the plot; I like using lining paper on bare walls; it provides a wonderful blank canvass to play with; lining paper doesn't have to have wallpaper overlaid as in my rooms it can simply be painted but why paint an entire wall or wallpaper it when it can be made a lot more interesting?

I hope I'm not preaching but like any novice I started from the bottom and its taken me a lifetime of mistakes to enjoy the position I'm now in; go on give it some thought and research then have a go but please play safely

Kind regards, Colin.

Makeovers_006.JPG

Take a deep breath and go for it because at this stage there's no going back.

Makeovers_007.JPG

The new high efficiency gas fire; tiled surround and marble hearth were installed professionally due to our rules and regulations regarding gas safety; the wooden mantle I designed; made and installed this being constructed of MDF left over from the coffered ceiling project; the softwood framing panels I moulded using my big 3hp router running over 600' of moulding; the frames are simply nailed to the walls using lost head nails.

Makeovers_008.JPG

As I've previously said Bron and I like stately homes so this is our new stately home; Bron chose the carpet which was professionally installed. The whole room including the fire and carpet only cost £2,400; it was a lot of work but it was also very enjoyable and interesting. We could have done as so many do and apply wallpaper but we love how it turned out.

Makeovers_001.JPG

Wainscot panelling under construction in our master bedroom. Once again lots of MDF was used; the frames are 18mm but the backing is 6mm. V grooves were routed into the backing taking a great deal of care to ensure spacing was correct; the frames were moulded with the big router fitted with a Roman Ogee profile cutter; the router cut this in one pass at full depth; I mounted the router on the bench with guides allowing the frame members to be pushed through at speed and with little effort.

Makeovers_002.JPG

New electrics run in and the wainscot panelling installed and given a coat of Zinsser Cover Stain primer paint.

Makeovers_003.JPG

I bought an Apollo paint sprayer and sprayed the panelling also I sprayed the wooden coffered ceiling; brushing would have taken ages and I was after the best finish possible.

Makeovers_004.JPG

A new carpet completed the project.

Makeovers_009.JPG

The newly installed coffered ceiling now completed with a new pendant lamp;the lamp wasn't quite low enough so I did a bit of woodturning and turned a solid beech lowering block; as I say a bit of thought goes a long way.

Makeovers_010.JPG


Project completed; I'm unsure what this cost; it did take seven full sheets of 18mm MDF but although it did cost money I saved a fortune on labour doing the lot myself other than installing the new carpet. Whenever I start a project I give it lots of thought taking it right back to basics and only when I'm happy I'll then order materials.

As Doug rightly says enjoy yourself but also enjoy the looks on visitors faces as they stare in disbelief before they return home and start decorating. :)
 
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When I was a youngster one of my neighbors gave me some sage advice that I have tried to live by. He said, “Anything you build you can rebuild”. He was chastising me for my fear of failure. He also told me that procrastination is often disguised as being a perfectionist. If you fail at a project remember you can redo it and no one will ever know.
 
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Hi,

I couldn't agree with you more Doug; I too think if it's been done before I can also do it even if it takes all the patience I have. You are so right about "fear of failure" it's easy to sit back and look at someone else's wonderful work but this someone else would have made the mistakes all novices make; what saddens me is the way visitors react when they see what I've done; for some reason they seem they need to justify why they cannot do similar work saying; you've got the time; you've got the tools; you've got the space and the best of all you've got the skills? So I've been born with a full workshop of tools in a well equipped workshop; without having to learn the skills? Why can't they just be honest and say they don't want to have a go; I'd respect them more.

Have a go Johnny and hopefully you'll be sharing your successes here on the forum; it's impossible to fail completely if you have a go because even if you don't succeed you'll have gained some valuable experience.

Kind regards, Colin.
 

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