Ideas on what to do to the front of the porch


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Hello, Im looking for others ideas on what to do with the front of the porch. I did not install the lattice and I do not like it, I was thinking of doing something like a plywood backing and closing up the underneath of the porch, then covering the plywood with white vertical lined vinyl with kind of like a kick plate or baseboard type of panel at the bottom so it wouldn't get damaged when trimming the grass. Any ideas are helpful, thanks in advance.
 

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Thanks. Do you think pressure treated plywood would be any different? I know it's not forever
 
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Or do you have suggestions on what to use in lieu of plywood?
 
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I built this with soft wood and 1/2" roofing plywood.

Coats of Dulux mahogany Woodsheen every few years has kept it in perfect condition, no rot anywhere.

This is a recent photo, it's also my avartar, it'll be thirty-two years old in September. I re-felted the roof ten years ago.

P1000680.JPG


Same with this shed. That's a bit older, it's forty-three years old. I replaced the roofing felt for the second time in its life, a couple of months ago.

P1020443.JPG


Roofing ply, (if they still make it), is ideal if you look after it. Even in places like Manchester in England, where we get quite a bit of rain.
 
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Thanks, I'll look into it and see what I can find. Nice work by the way, those are some really good looking structures.
I built this with soft wood and 1/2" roofing plywood.

Coats of Dulux mahogany Woodsheen every few years has kept it in perfect condition, no rot anywhere.

This is a recent photo, it's also my avartar, it'll be thirty-two years old in September. I re-felted the roof ten years ago.

View attachment 2299

Same with this shed. That's a bit older, it's forty-three years old. I replaced the roofing felt for the second time in its life, a couple of months ago.

View attachment 2301

Roofing ply, (if they still make it), is ideal if you look after it. Even in places like Manchester in England, where we get quite a bit of rain.
Thanks, I'll look into it and see what I can find. Nice work by the way, those are some really good looking structures.
 
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Thanks, I'll look into it and see what I can find. Nice work by the way, those are some really good looking structures.

Thanks, I'll look into it and see what I can find. Nice work by the way, those are some really good looking structures.

Thanks for the kind words.

Here's the build video of our tea-house.

 
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Hi,

When I do a project like yours Phiphtie I like to improve whenever possible; just because timber has previously been used doesn't mean timber has to be used again.

There are alternatives where you needn't ever bother about weather damage again; how about this;

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/patrickbosman/natural-rock-building-exterior/

I'd seriously be looking at stone; this would solve the weather problem at least for the wall and add interesting visual impact; to the front a nice stone wall and perhaps by the garage an entrance giving storage space under the deck? Just two ideas to kick around.

Our bungalow is coming up to 60 years old; it still retains its original softwood window frames and front door; there were plain painted plywood panels below the window frames and these are still in place although about four years ago I covered them with 18mm thick cladding?

I gave the whole bungalow exterior and interior a comprehensive makeover totally changing the way it previously looked and by doing all the work myself I saved a great deal of money but I never ever skimp on material quality only buying the best available which I find always the cheapest long term.

May I suggest you stand back and look at your house as if it is a blank canvas; it's your home so do it as you like not as you think it should be done to please others.

Kind regards, Colin.

Bungalow front_0001.JPG


This looks very rough indeed; its 18 mm thick WBP plywood and is my new cladding being made by me; it's just an illusion but a good one and no one would know unless inspected very closely; I completely sealed back and front and all edges with top quality paint ensuring no bare grain remained; this cladding has now been subjected to weather extremes here on the exposed valley for the last four years; the original plywood panels are still in place but now covered by the new "cladding".

Bungalow front_0002.JPG


The large 8' x 4' plywood sheet being routed to imitate cladding; this is the big sheet of cladding seen above the garage doors.

Bungalow front_0003.JPG


Here's how I achieved accurate router guide; the wide slot was cut in one pass and then the angles cut in two passes; I've never seen this done this way but thought I'd give it a go and it worked perfectly.

Bungalow front_0004.JPG



Our bungalow is constructed of random stone and timber. The bungalow was designed with an up and over garage door; I was fed up of having to fully open the door each time I wanted to access or leave the garage; my solution; make new side hung doors; these look attractive; certainly much better than the up and over door and now I can pop in and out without the slightest trouble. The decking steelwork I made and assembled; the decking is actually 40' long spanning the bungalow front; I designed and built the new decking but used heavy steel for support; the decking boards are scaffolding boards painted all around. The new plywood cladding was very cheap to make and is a big improvement over the original plain plywood panels.

To the left of the garage doors I created a storage area the bungalow length where I store aggregates and building material out of site the metal gate is salvaged from an industrial cage. To the right we had 9 steps which I removed by hand digging tons of wet clay; I came up with the sloping path idea and installed the path 17 years ago; 3 neighbours have since copied my idea and another neighbour has copied my deck steel structure; the fence too is bespoke being designed; made and installed by me; I had to design the fence taking into account the slope of the new pathway; I added a full length handrail and I finished the front steelwork with an handrail.

Just because something has been done a certain way for many years doesn't mean it can't be changed as long as sound common sense is employed. This is the way I do jobs around home and hope it gives you a few ideas to bounce around. Good luck.
 
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Hi,

When I do a project like yours Phiphtie I like to improve whenever possible; just because timber has previously been used doesn't mean timber has to be used again.

There are alternatives where you needn't ever bother about weather damage again; how about this;

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/patrickbosman/natural-rock-building-exterior/

I'd seriously be looking at stone; this would solve the weather problem at least for the wall and add interesting visual impact; to the front a nice stone wall and perhaps by the garage an entrance giving storage space under the deck? Just two ideas to kick around.

Our bungalow is coming up to 60 years old; it still retains its original softwood window frames and front door; there were plain painted plywood panels below the window frames and these are still in place although about four years ago I covered them with 18mm thick cladding?

I gave the whole bungalow exterior and interior a comprehensive makeover totally changing the way it previously looked and by doing all the work myself I saved a great deal of money but I never ever skimp on material quality only buying the best available which I find always the cheapest long term.

May I suggest you stand back and look at your house as if it is a blank canvas; it's your home so do it as you like not as you think it should be done to please others.

Kind regards, Colin.

View attachment 2309

This looks very rough indeed; its 18 mm thick WBP plywood and is my new cladding being made by me; it's just an illusion but a good one and no one would know unless inspected very closely; I completely sealed back and front and all edges with top quality paint ensuring no bare grain remained; this cladding has now been subjected to weather extremes here on the exposed valley for the last four years; the original plywood panels are still in place but now covered by the new "cladding".

View attachment 2310

The large 8' x 4' plywood sheet being routed to imitate cladding; this is the big sheet of cladding seen above the garage doors.

View attachment 2311

Here's how I achieved accurate router guide; the wide slot was cut in one pass and then the angles cut in two passes; I've never seen this done this way but thought I'd give it a go and it worked perfectly.

View attachment 2312


Our bungalow is constructed of random stone and timber. The bungalow was designed with an up and over garage door; I was fed up of having to fully open the door each time I wanted to access or leave the garage; my solution; make new side hung doors; these look attractive; certainly much better than the up and over door and now I can pop in and out without the slightest trouble. The decking steelwork I made and assembled; the decking is actually 40' long spanning the bungalow front; I designed and built the new decking but used heavy steel for support; the decking boards are scaffolding boards painted all around. The new plywood cladding was very cheap to make and is a big improvement over the original plain plywood panels.

To the left of the garage doors I created a storage area the bungalow length where I store aggregates and building material out of site the metal gate is salvaged from an industrial cage. To the right we had 9 steps which I removed by hand digging tons of wet clay; I came up with the sloping path idea and installed the path 17 years ago; 3 neighbours have since copied my idea and another neighbour has copied my deck steel structure; the fence too is bespoke being designed; made and installed by me; I had to design the fence taking into account the slope of the new pathway; I added a full length handrail and I finished the front steelwork with an handrail.

Just because something has been done a certain way for many years doesn't mean it can't be changed as long as sound common sense is employed. This is the way I do jobs around home and hope it gives you a few ideas to bounce around. Good luck.
Thanks for you input and for taking so much time. I do like the stone and it would give it a more luxurious look than vinyl would of course. I've never done anything like that, but I am able to do many things. I will take some time and find some similar pictures to this idea and figure out the costs and put it into consideration. Thanks again
 
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Much obliged. Do you think weight treated compressed wood would be any extraordinary...???I know it's not until the end of time
 
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Hi,

You're most welcome Phiphtie; I hope it's of use to you.

Can you please give an example of the treated compressed wood you mention oliviaivy337 I'm interested. A picture or a link would be useful?

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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