Electric Planer - avoiding snipe


Ian

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I've just had a new carpet put in a room, and it's raised the level of the floor by 10mm or so. I hadn't realised quite so much needed to come off the door, so I started trimming the door down with an electric planer (before resorting to a circular saw).

I rarely use the electric planer, but sometimes when I do I end up taking out a small extra chunk at the end of the run, as the front of the plane drops away. I'm careful to avoid this, but even so, it still is pretty hard to avoid entirely. Any tips from more experienced users on how I can avoid this snipe?
 
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Hi,

Excellent suggestion Silentrunning.

To prevent snipe on such as your door bottom Ian as you say if a lot needs to be removed then a circular saw is the easiest option taking into account the blade rotation; masking tape can help a bit to prevent splintering as can running a sharp utilty knife but for general power planing then a couple more options are to accurately and very clearly mark the limit line to trim to on the door; rather than cut straight through in one pass cut from both ends; the first cut about 6" long then finish from the opposite end; another option is to attach a sacrificial short length of timber (2" x 1" x 6") screwing it to the door edge with its end level with the door bottom this has double advantages in that it allows the plane to run straight through whilst avoiding the usual tear out at the end of the cut. light cuts are better than an hogging cut and it's important to apply plenty of downward pressure to the rear of the plane keeping the rear plane sole in contact until the cutter clears the door otherwise the cutter takes a deeper bite as the front plane sole loses support hence the dreaded snipe. The screw holes are easy enough to hide.

I've just briefly browsed the web and YouTube but information appears to concentrate on planer thicknessers.

I've just enjoyed a brew so back to a lot of grafting before another day slips quietly by.

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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Ian

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I leave 1/4” to 1”2” unplanned and then remove that with a hacksaw or rasp file. Not a professional way to do it but it works.
Simple and works, I like it! I don't need an immaculate finish, and after a light sand I don't think it would be noticeable anyway. Thanks, I'm going to do this.

To prevent snipe on such as your door bottom Ian as you say if a lot needs to be removed then a circular saw is the easiest option taking into account the blade rotation; masking tape can help a bit to prevent splintering as can running a sharp utilty knife but for general power planing then a couple more options are to accurately and very clearly mark the limit line to trim to on the door; rather than cut straight through in one pass cut from both ends; the first cut about 6" long then finish from the opposite end; another option is to attach a sacrificial short length of timber (2" x 1" x 6") screwing it to the door edge with its end level with the door bottom this has double advantages in that it allows the plane to run straight through whilst avoiding the usual tear out at the end of the cut. light cuts are better than an hogging cut and it's important to apply plenty of downward pressure to the rear of the plane keeping the rear plane sole in contact until the cutter clears the door otherwise the cutter takes a deeper bite as the front plane sole loses support hence the dreaded snipe. The screw holes are easy enough to hide.
Thanks Colin, I've tried being so careful with the plane (i.e. rear pressure towards the end of the movement), but still manage to ding out just a little bit more than I need. I'm sure with enough practice, I'd be fine, but at the moment I'm not ;). I think I'll probably just rasp the final stretch down, rather than risking snipe - but if I need a perfect finish then screwing a temporary support is a good solution.
 

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