Cutting glazing wooden beading.


Joined
Jul 29, 2018
Messages
728
Reaction score
510
Location
Huddersfield. UK.
Country
United Kingdom
Hi,

I'm expecting 3 single glass panes of privacy glass and 3 double glazing units (Pilkington K) to arrive in a few days so I'm preparing for them. Removing the old wooden beading tends to destroy it so rather than mess around I make new beading.

Glass beading_0001.JPG

Running my small planer/thicknesser to bring timber to correct thickness before ripping the bead blanks on the table saw.
Glass beading_0002.JPG

Quite a bit of time was spent setting up the bandsaw as seen; a nice sliding fit was needed and it pays to take care at this stage. Nothing fancy but simple enough to set up. Typical of my luck having got everthing perfectly set up and having run a few beads the bandsaw blade snapped with a loud bang adding another 15 minutes to the job. I was wearing ear defenders and dust mask; I've recently assembled a cyclone dust extractor but never seem to have time spare to add dust outlets to the machines but this comes down to being retired with not enough hours in a day.
Glass beading_0003.JPG

Some of the hardwood beading just needing sanding. Such beading to buy is expensive but I usually have offcuts kicking around as here; the timber is part of a staircase given to me by a neighbour so it cost nothing. Obviously it takes time to plane and cut etc but it saves a lot of money and running around but one real advantage is I can machine beading to my own specification. I've got five routers but to cut bevels at any angle is very challenging so the quickest way was to use the bandsaw. If you use this method please retain all fingers and thumbs.

Just passing a few minutes whilst I enjoy a mug of tea.

Kind regards, Colin.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Ian
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jul 11, 2020
Messages
92
Reaction score
41
Location
Yarm, UK
Country
United Kingdom
As usual ColinW, you have made a marvellous job of those beads. By pure coincidence, I too have been making beads today too. They are for an oak china cabinet I am making, to hold the glazing. As you would expect, the beads are out of oak too, from my 150-year old church pews I saved from being burnt. Being such old oak, it is quickly taking the edge off any tools or blades I use. The planer thicknesser blade is dull just from machining them. I did all the work in the open air but in shade since it was so hot. Luckily, I have several spare blades for it.
The glass is taking a while to come as it will have to be toughened and carry the corresponding mark to say so.
I am under pressure, as the 'customer' (my daughter) is driving 250 miles each way to collect it when finished. That means I receive progress requests every other day! She was promised a cabinet when I first rescued the pews in 2004, so has waited a while. I reckon another couple of weeks to fine sand and oil before I can message 'it's ready'.

ColinA
 
Joined
Jul 29, 2018
Messages
728
Reaction score
510
Location
Huddersfield. UK.
Country
United Kingdom
Hi,

Many thanks for the compliment ColinA.

You've made a lovely job of your cabinet; your daughter's in for a treat when she collects it and will treasure it. Is the back panel also solid oak. It's a pity we can't bottle the smell of freshly cut timber; it always gives me an high and the aroma lasts for hours in the workshop but also does the airborne dust. What finish are you using Colin.

Old oak is like machining stone just as you say Colin; it's virtually impossible to use hand tools on it; years ago I bought a car load of solid hardwood flooring from a local mill which was being demolished; back home I only had hand tools; even my saw skidded off it; the lot was given to a neighbour as firewood.

Our single panes of glass have also to be toughened to comply with current regulations and rightly so for safety.

Stand by for massive storms; now I've got the large panel out from our front door by the time the glass and the butyl tape arrives monsoon weather will arrive at the same time and we don't half catch it here on the exposed valley side.

I was in for an unpleasant surprise yesterday whilst removing the plywood panel from the door; the ply is WBP and was fully protected by expensive Benjamin Moore paint before even being installed knowing the harsh weather it would be exposed to. The outer beading moulded from 3/4" square was secured using stainless steel screws; the inner beading away from the weather secured with standard steel panel pins; the bottom steel pins had almost rusted through and the bottom of the ply had started to de-laminate; I had taken a great deal of care to protect the panel and it was fully bedded in linseed oil putty so I'm puzzled as to what has happened; modern ply is mostly rubbish. A few years ago I wanted some thin plywood to make backs from for vintage valve radios; at the timber yard as the ply was fed through the table saw it was de-laminating which about sums up the quality these day.

Having now seen the condition of the top panel which is only three years old I'm now going to also replace the smaller bottom panel but as yet undecided with what; deciding to replace the top panel with privacy glass I'm pleased I caught this problem before another winter made it worse; I made the complete porch and installed it taking so much care it's depressing to see this kind of thing happen. The new beading is a different profile this time being steeply angled to shed water rapidly; I'm painting everything before assembly and this time I'm using butyl tape not linseed oil putty.


I used butyl putty when I replaced the DG units to the bungalow front and it's been fine but this time for ease of application I'm trying butyl tape which is double sided self adhesive. I had lots of problems sourcing this butyl tape because online I wanted to use PayPal no longer trusting my card details on the Internet; I spent ages browsing then amazingly found a company virtually on my doorstep just the other side of Huddersfield and so far I'm absolutely delighted with their service; the tape is out of stock but due in early this week; the company is this;

https://www.dortechdirect.co.uk/

Nothing was too much trouble; the staff are delightful to deal with and I paid by pro-forma straight from my bank; I'll receive an email once the tape is available for collection.

As usual a decent sized job has grown out of all proportion but with my luck I expect this so might as well settle down and once again do my absolute best to keep our dire Yorkshire weather outside where it belongs. I'm still dreaming of getting into the workshop to play with my toys doing what I want to do not doing what I've got to do. I'm never bored.

Workshop_0001_02.JPG


The new porch I made and installed three years ago; glass is grey tinted Pilkington which I'll retain but the new glass to replace the top ply panel on the door is privacy glass Pilkington Stippolyte; I'm also using Stippolyte to replace the original front door and side panel glass all to be toughened. Perhaps the beading I made is the wrong profile it not clearing water so this time the new beading will be steeply angled; I didn't expect to revisit so much work so soon but that's life.

https://www.ukglasscentre.co.uk/stippolyte-pilkington-glass

Glazing job._0001.JPG

From the inside; the original door and side panel glass removed also the porch door top ply panel removed.

Glazing job._0002.JPG

Depressing after so much time and effort was put in; this was hidden by the beading and paint so came as a very unpleasant surprise.

It was drizzling earlier whilst I was out shopping and now I want to crack on with this job it's a black hole outside and I dare not start in case it buckets down with rain; Yorkshire is a truly beautiful place to live in; two days each year we call summer.

Kind regards ColinW.
 
Joined
Jul 11, 2020
Messages
92
Reaction score
41
Location
Yarm, UK
Country
United Kingdom
Thanks ColinW,
It was hard slog cutting all the parts for the cabinet, but I got there in the end. I dithered about the back and couldn't find any oak large enough, even as two pieces. Then I remembered a firm in Thirsk, called Tresk who make solid furniture to order. So, a scouting trip unearthed the fact that they use oak veneered birch ply for their cabinet backs. In the workshop, they showed me a full sheet and said that their supplier does a cut to order service as well. Noting the company name on the polythene wrapper, I ordered a piece as soon as I got back home. Some might call what I did as a form of espionage, but I see it as 'sharing knowledge'. The firm is Atlantic Timber and I ordered 6mm and rebated it into the carcass panels. In the end, I ordered a full 8ftx4ft sheet, so I have spare for other little jobs. The quality and finish is superb.

As for finish, I thought to oil it with tung oil, several coats, but still undecided. I don't want to darken it. Any suggestions?

ColinA
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jul 29, 2018
Messages
728
Reaction score
510
Location
Huddersfield. UK.
Country
United Kingdom
Hi,

Thanks for the update ColinA. Oak veneered ply is very useful indeed for cabinet work; I used some when I made my wife a 16 drawer unit for her card making materials; rebating yours in was a good move; it hides the edges and hence no one would ever guess it was veneered ply.

I've gathered lots of information over the years just by being nosy or looking over someone's shoulder; many years ago I wanted to run a 3 phase motor from single phase and whilst at the sompany I quietly watch the guy doing the work using a capacitor; I blew a couple of capacitors but these days such information is on YouTube etc.

Regarding finishing your cabinet; yes I do have a suggestion; Matt Polyurethane Varnish; I've used lots of this on both fitted and free standing furniture in fact the desk I'm sitting at is solid oak and finished with this. Gloss polyurethane can look really tacky and treacly when applied by a novice so gets a bad name but Matt polyurethane looks so much better; the trick is to get it on fast without trying to get rid of all the brush marks; I put plenty on and quickly level it then leave it alone because it sets up quickly. I've no preference as to make of this varnish and have used Wickes which is as good as any.

https://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-Interior-Varnish---Clear-Matt-750ml/p/170759

I've also done quite a bit of french polishing but this isn't a suitable finish for oak or any such open grain timber; these need grain filling first and it tends to be a long process.

Bron's new oak drawers..jpg

The drawers I made in solid oak but stained also all the home made kitchen the paneling and the door stained and finished with matt polyurethane varnish.

Finished desk..jpg

The desk I made in solid oak for the frames but left natural and finished in matt polyurethane varnish; the panels are Formica and years on it still looks new.

Your choice though; just my suggestion which works for me.

Kind regards, ColinW.
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top