Cold or chemical welding


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I need to weld a nut to a stainless steel tube but I do not have a welder. I'm building a router table using my old plunge router and I want to be able to raise and lower the router from the table top by turning a threaded bolt through to the router and thought of using one of the stabilizing (plunge) rods (actually stainless steel tubes) to do this. I can put an M12 threaded rod through the tube and I would like to affix a thread (nut, rivnut, ...) to the other end of the tube to accept the rod and carry the weight of the router so I can raise and lower it.

I have something called J-B Weld steel reinforced epoxy which I believe is also known as cold welding or chemical welding. The rod, tube and nut will be subject to a lot of vibration. I'm skeptical that merely epoxying a nut to the end of the tube with be strong enough to carry the weight and withstand the vibration. The product says it can withstand 5020 psi. Does anyone have experience with chemical welding or this product? How does the bond compare to conventional welding? Do you have any recommendations or another way to securely affix a nut (or something that will accept a threaded rod) to a tube? Thanks
Here's a picture.
IMG_5002.JPG

cheers.
 
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I like JB Weld. It has amazing strength. I have used it in similar situations as yours but have added a second nut to jam the threads. Tightening the nuts against each other over a film of JB Weld has never failed me yet.
 
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Chemical fixings are widely used for fixing fitting like handrails to precast concrete where an expanding anchor would break out.
Essentially, stress-free fixings.
I've used them to pull 9" walls back into place.
Fischer do a two tube mixing cartridge that will stick anything, so something like your application would be small beer.
Only thing is, you need to prepare as time to set is short.
As Doug says, there are epoxy based metal, concrete welds available. Devcon was the one I've used in the past.
 
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