Oven conversion from natural gas to propane

Discussion in 'Appliances' started by turner_resort, Jun 30, 2018.

  1. turner_resort

    turner_resort

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    I am at wits end. Anyone had problems with GE built in oven conversions? Changed control valve, regulator, and ignitor. All function by themselves. Converted regulator to propane (simple task). When placed in the oven system, no flow of propane from regulator. If I bypass the OEM regulator and attach outdoor grill regulator directly to control valve, oven ignites and flames, but regulator is to big producing large flame.
     
    turner_resort, Jun 30, 2018
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  2. turner_resort

    Pappydan

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    Did you change out the orifices for the burners. There are different gas pressures for natural and propane. Natural gas uses a lower pressure and requires a larger orifice for the burner. Running propane thru a nat. gas orifice will deliver too much gas and result in a bigger flame. Did you buy a conversion kit from GE for the oven? If so, the kit should have come with the correct sized orifices that need to be switched out. Most of my experience is with commercial equipment and While I have converted some residential appliances, sometimes they can be a pain in the ass. Two more questions. What is the model number of the oven. And, not being a smartass, what is you experience level working with gas appliances on a scale of 1-10
     
    Pappydan, Jul 1, 2018
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  3. turner_resort

    piglet11

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    As Pappydan says, a new oven will generally come with sets of nozzles for natural or LPG gas. If purchased brand new, the manufacturer should be able to supply a set. But, take care, if you are messing about with regulators etc., you could find yourself in a pile of trouble. The least you should do is leak test on any work with an approved manometer. Natural gas is normally regulated by the utility at about 20-mBar. My old plumber mate would pass an installation if there was no change in a 2-minute period on the manometer with all the valves closed (both ends). A bubble test might tell you something is wrong, but not how much.
     
    piglet11, Jul 3, 2018
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