New front entrance.

Discussion in 'Building' started by Retired, Sep 6, 2018.

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    Retired

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    Hi,

    Over the last couple of weeks I've been extremely busy putting in up to 14 hour days apart from meals on creating a new entrance to our bungalow. I considered doing this quite a few years ago because living here on the exposed steep valley side our bungalow is subjected to extremes of weather; I use our hall as my office and sitting here with terrific wind and horizontal rain hitting the door near my left elbow isn't what I consider a peaceful environment; I could even feel the icy blast through the keyhole.

    Having finally caught up Bron mentioned this front entrance saying it would be good to sort it out before the winter kicks in so I got stuck in but absolutely nothing has gone right. With all the measurements taken and we had browsed the web for a suitable design I headed to the timber yard; the first timber yard I looked at the timber and walked away in disgust. The second timber yard was much more promising and the timber looked decent it being PAR (planed all round) redwood so I placed the timber order. A few days later the timber arrived and was carried into the warm workshop; as work started within two days this timber started to move quite badly; my chum David remarked with a bit of whittling it would make nice propellers.

    It just got worse and worse as I worked with this timber; I made a routing jig to aid routing the tenons but had to abandon this because the tenons were rubbish; I then tried using the DeWalt radial arm saw to cut the tenons but again without success. In the end I selected a "Face" & "Side" marking each piece and only worked from these references; I made a tenoning jig to fit my big circular saw bench and after a test cut finally cut the tenon cheeks; the tenon shoulder cuts were done on the radial arm saw. The mortices were cut using my Record Power square chisel morticer taking it slowly because a mistake could ruin hours of work.

    The new entrance was to have a new door with a new side panel each side with the door central. The two side panel frames were made first and what a fight I suffered whilst trying to get the joints to go home after glue up; once glue is applied there's no time to hang around so I was just the right side of panic having to use brute force and once the joint ends entered they were forced home by heavy duty sash cramps; I was a worn out nervous wreck assembling each of these side panels but at last they were fully assembled; joints pulled tight and glued wedges driven home.

    Next job was to add top and bottom frame members using long wood screws; this was yet another nightmare; sash cramps and clamps were needed to get everything into alignment; how I hated this timber and loathed the supplier. The headroom in the workshop is very low meaning both this big frame and door had to be worked on with them in edge unable to stand them upright; the main frame measures 96" tall and 60" wide; once assembled it occupied a great deal of workshop space which was highly frustrating and now it was heavy. In order to prevent it self destructing given the huge amount of force to get it aligned best thing was to install it very securely in position between the two random stone walls.

    My bad luck still dogged me; I carried the big heavy SDS drill up to drill the holes in the walls but the drill refused to run in percussion mode; I could scream. Nothing for it but to drill the holes with my Bosch power drill on hammer action; oh what fun I was having; long concrete screws were run home securing the frame to the walls so at least the frame couldn't now distort.

    Still more bad luck; I had browsed the web looking for suitable glass for the side panels and Bron and I really did like the look of Pilkington Dark Grey Glass;

    https://www.pilkington.com/en/globa...pilkington-supergrey-and-pilkington-dark-grey

    I emailed our local Huddersfield Plate Glass but now at 71 years young I wondered if I would live long enough to receive a reply; having waited long enough I then phoned a glass merchant in Morley who kindly referred me to Huddersfield Plate Glass? I then emailed Pilkington Glass explaining my needs and the problems in obtaining their well advertised product; once again I was referred to Huddersfield Plate Glass. Now absolutely fed up and in torrential rain (yes my pet cloud Blackie really enjoys my company) I set off to Huddersfield Plate glass; absolutely nothing was going right; as I passed where I used to work as a slave there was gridlock due to roadworks with the usual temporary traffic lights; I sat there boxed in with the rain bouncing down around me; finally I broke free but as I was now very near Wickes I decided I was already wet so popped into Wickes to buy a corner plastic gutter fitting to replace a leaking one; in store I wandered around and after what seemed like a lifetime there was just one lady customer in the store standing right in front of the item I needed blocking it whilst she day dreamed; I reached past her and at last was on my way with Blackie still doing his thing; at Huddersfield Plate Glass yet another soaking as I entered the building; I explained to the very helpful guy my needs but he being a Pilkington stockist had never heard of Pilkington Dark Grey glass? However by now I was rapidly losing the will to live after all I only wanted a bit of glass not endless hassle; the guy said he was sure he had a sheet of grey tinted glass it being the darkest he ever sold saying he's had this sheet for a long time because there wasn't any call for it? How strange because everywhere I look there are hospitals; public buildings and private homes with this tinted glass. After a fruitless search he apologised saying he was sure he had a sheet but couldn't locate it but he did take my details then I suffered another soaking as I headed to the car.

    Next place to visit was Huddersfield Decorators and another soaking as I entered the store; at the counter I enquired as to best exterior filler for screw/nail holes; the guy recommended Polyfilla All Purpose filler echoed by a customer saying this was definitely the best filler for the job. Another soaking as I headed to the car and at last drove home.

    Nicely settled in at home and drying out the phone rang; the guy at Huddersfield Plate Glass had found the sheet of glass and could cut it immediately this now late Friday afternoon; I had 30 minutes to get to the store before closing otherwise it meant Saturday morning; I'm a nice target for Blackie so enduring yet more soakings I finally had the tinted glass home; not the dark tint we wanted but tinted. The guy at Huddersfield Plate Glass was most helpful and I've visited them many times over the years but why have email if they don't reply?

    Linseed oil putty has been used to bed both the glass and the ply panels; I cut all the beading from 2"x1" PAR redwood routing each edge of the face with 3/8" round over bearing guided cutter then band sawing to give thick 3/4" x 3/4" beading which has been mitred at the corners.

    The WBP plywood again is rubbish but I doubt it would be any better quality wherever bought from; this was accurately cut to size then "V" grooves added using the small B&D router with V bit installed. All timber and ply has been painted completely to seal it especially edges of the ply. Zinsser Cover Stain was used as a primer and top quality Benjamin Moore paint is being used for top coats to match our existing colours.

    The middle and bottom rails for the new door needed to be 8" wide so two 4" wide pieces were biscuit jointed and glued using waterproof glue being cramped tightly until the glue set; the majority of timber used is PAR 4" x 2" giving a substantially strong frame and door.

    Grade 13 Stainless Steel ball bearing hinges are used; a new cast iron letterbox and door handles installed and an expensive 5 lever mortice lock fitted. The door was a nightmare just as the two frames to assemble due to the twisted and distorted timber; the only way working on my own to get the joints to enter was to wedge the door on edge between two heavy benches and take a deep breathe whilst heaving for all I was worth; with the glue added speed was called for and with the joints just entered the door was dumped on the bench and I really took great pleasure in forcing the joints home using heavy sash cramps before knocking in glued wedges.

    The problems just carried on; no sooner had I applied paint working outside that Blackie gave it a soaking in fact I'm only on the keyboard now because Blackie has stopped me working.

    The story above is only a small account of the suffering I endured during this project; as I say absolutely nothing went as planned; I've worked myself to a standstill many days putting in 14 hour days and been too tired at night to use the keyboard but I sure am as stubborn as they come; nothing at all was going to stop me completing this project; the sun has just appeared now everything is soaking wet outside.

    I've just reached my 71st birthday and my lovely wife Bron asked of me what I would like from her as a prezzie generously offering to buy anything at all I fancied. Having just endured torment with modern rubbish PAR redwood timber I decided to select a 12" thicknesser;

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/DeWalt-DEW733-240V-Portable-Thicknesser-1800W/351890928249?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

    In future I'll buy sawn timber and plane it myself just before using it then hopefully the timber won't have time to warp and twist; I never ever want to endure what I've suffered over the last two weeks again; I've made many doors and frames over the years but never with so much frustration and hassle.

    Bad look sticks with me; yesterday I bought a weather bar for the door bottom selecting hardwood "Meranti" meaning no knots to mess around with; this was sealed in a polythene tube when bought; back home I measured and trimmed it to length to find a split in one end that I hadn't noticed or indeed expected; there are two ends so with my bad luck I trimmed off the good end? I'm used to this happening and this problem was solved by securing the split with a 2" long stainless steel wood screw; why does everything bite me?

    I've rambled on enough so here are a few pictures;

    Kind regards, Colin.

    New entrance _001 - Copy - Copy.JPG
    The original front entrance to our bungalow.

    New entrance _002 - Copy - Copy.JPG
    Side frame rails biscuit jointed to give 8" x 2" section.

    New entrance _004 - Copy - Copy.JPG
    At last after hours of failure; home made tenoning jig in action cutting a test piece working from one face only.

    New entrance _005 - Copy - Copy.JPG
    Door rails with tenons through cut; letter box opening added.

    New entrance _006 - Copy - Copy.JPG
    Both side frames fully assembled but what a fight to get the joints home.

    New entrance _007 - Copy - Copy.JPG
    The main frame fully assembled laid on edge too tall to stand upright in the low workshop; What a nightmare of a job.

    New entrance _008 - Copy - Copy.JPG

    Main frame finally installed ready foe panels and door adding.

    New entrance _009 - Copy - Copy.JPG
    It looks so easy but what a fight to get the joints home due to distorted timber. Sanding ready for Zinsser primer.

    New entrance _010 - Copy.JPG
    Yes it's been worth the nightmare but its worn me out; door weather bar now added and more painting yet to do.

    New entrance _012 - Copy.JPG

    Routing the panel V grooves; note small wood block used as spacer for router alignment.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2018
    Retired, Sep 6, 2018
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    Ian Administrator

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    The hard work looks worth it - that's a really neat project, especially given the timber troubles!

    I need to take a leaf from your book and make more jigs for my work. I rarely do, unless I need to use it more than once, but even for a single job it would make things so much neater and easier if I did.

    Do you use a dust extraction system in your workshop, or do you solely rely on the enclosed ventilator helmet you mentioned a while back?
     
    Ian, Sep 9, 2018
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    Hi,

    Many thanks Ian for your kind words; this project has been a real pain mostly due to the terrible timber.

    I like to make jigs and although they take time to make most can be made from offcuts but as you rightly say they ensure a better finish; jigs really do come into their own for repetition; once a jig is made it affords accuracy to every piece which is difficult indeed to attain otherwise. At work I designed a very heavy metal table it being a jig for pallet making; the pallet timber was stack cut on the Wadkin radial arm saw against a stop ensuring all were exactly the same length; I used to order a wagon full of timber at a time and by using the saw and big jig pallets could be assembled rapidly; the table arms were adjustable for different sized pallets; the smallest pallets could be nailed two at a time in a minute using counterbalanced overhead nailer. I enjoy making jigs and take a lot of care to make them very accurately.

    Here's more work carried out using home made jigs saving a great deal of time but ensuring high accuracy;

    Jig work_001.JPG
    Wainscot paneling; softwood with jig routed beads and dado rail. "V" grooved 6mm MDF panels.

    Jig work_001_01.JPG

    Jig for routing joints.

    Jig work_002.JPG
    Same bedroom front wall.

    Jig work_002_01.JPG
    Paper template giving accurate joint layout; cheaper to replace paper than material.

    Jig work_003.JPG
    Another picture but showing coffered ceiling I designed and installed

    Jig work_003_01.JPG
    Paneling being installed.

    Jig work_005.JPG

    Another jig for when I wanted over 300' of moulding; lots of mess but it worked a treat.

    At the moment Ian I use extraction on the big saw bench but wear the Trend Air Shield helmet for other machines/tools which create harmful dust; I'm planning a cyclone extractor for use with the bandsaw; routers and sanders etc because these really do make a big mess; the main thing of course is personal safety which I never neglect.

    I love playing with all my toys; Bron never ever complains but encourages me with all my assorted projects because once the mess is cleared we reap the benefits. This front entrance project has been well worth the hassle and with the onset of winter we'll notice a lot of difference.

    One thing I always do is have my cheap camera nearby then I can take images of work in progress not only to post on forums but to use as reference at a later date if needed.

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
    Retired, Sep 9, 2018
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    Retired

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    Hi,

    Just for interest here is my low tech method of enlarging numbers. Print out numbers as large as I can using the computer at A4 size then set up a single light source to shine directly down from above; place a number on a sheet of glass with paper below; I used wall paper lining paper it being big enough; then by adjusting the height of the glass the desired size of number will be shown as a shadow to draw around then cut out the number; transfer this number to self adhesive vinyl and attach with masking tape then cut out following the number profile; easy once known; dreaming up the idea was the hard part. :)

    Kind regards, Colin.

    Enlarging_001.JPG Enlarging_002.JPG
     
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    Ian Administrator

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    Hahaha, what a clever way to enlarge something! I'd never have thought to do that :D

    You've sold me on the idea of making more jigs, now that I've got the equipment to make use of them. Now I just need a project ;).
     
    Ian, Sep 11, 2018
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    Hi,

    Thanks Ian.

    There's usually a solution to a problem with a bit of thought; here's a picture of the numbers I made for the rear of the bungalow;

    Bungalow exterior makeover August 2016 (7).JPG

    I've never problems in finding work or projects; just this one picture shows lots of jobs I've done; the door I made by hand cutting the joints with hammer and chisel; the patio I laid but underneath I installed flood defences and new plastic drains; the outside tap; the stone arch above the window cutting the stones with my 4" angle grinder; new light above the door; sealed drains for the kitchen pipes and gutter downpipe; new gutters etc; Bron and I even replaced both the main bungalow roof and the two roomed extension roof; security light and the pointing; the wheelie bins have a home to the side of the bungalow but I was working there when I took the picture; the paint is expensive Benjamin Moore it being water based from America all this in just one picture; I have thousands of pictures covering the jobs/projects we've carried out here in the last 31 years; I'm not smart but I do enjoy improving our home at every opportunity.

    Have a look roud Ian I'm sure you'll find plenty of projects to keep you interested; one important thing I learned many years ago is to take a job back to basics and try to improve upon it rather than simply copy what has been done before. Good luck in your endeavours.

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
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    Hi,

    A quick update; the concrete floor in the entrance had a decent slope of about 3/4" and when we bought the tiles we were informed one bag of adhesive would be sufficient; I make up my own mind regarding quantities and thought one bag of adhesive insufficient considering the slope. Today I visited Screwfix and bought a 20kg bag of self levelling compound thinking this would just be enough to cover the floor; I mixed the whole bag as per instructions and although it hasn't fully covered it's good enough level to accept the new floor tiles once it hardens; with my luck I would have run out of tile adhesive half way through laying them; it pays to think for oneself? I couldn't work on the floor due to the confines so simply poured the compound then leaving it alone to set; there are lots of bubbles but as tiles are being laid upon it no problem.

    I dream of finishing this front entrance before winter sets in.

    Kind regards, Colin.

    DSC00957.JPG DSC00958.JPG
     
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    Hi,

    Still no let up to the problems on this porch project. I wrongly believed "Self levelling" meant it levelled itself? Yesterday I poured the self levelling compound and it appeared to spread OK; today the high spots have moved and the floor remains as bad as ever. To add insult to injury I needed to sort out the door threshold but kept being rained off; having just nicely settled in bed last night the light rain forecasted turned into a downpour at around 11 pm. Getting dressed again I tried my best to stop water entering under the door using towels; I even tried to tape the gap but the tape refused to adhere; in the end I gave up in disgust it just being one problem after another; my personal black cloud Blackie really does like me.

    Everything outside was soaking wet all this morning but around 2 pm the sun briefly appeared and it dried enough for me to tackle the threshold which hopefully will now keep Blackie at bay.

    I'm at the moment undecided regarding this self levelling floor; I might take it up and lay an old fashioned sand/cement screed which I should have done in the first place; once the floor is levelled and the tiles laid then I can get on with installing the new outdoor lighting.

    Last night as dusk was drawing in I put on lots of protective clothing; heavy gloves tucked into the cuffs of my site jacket; hood pulled over my head and cap; I had bought wasp killing powder and a protective net for my head; fully protected and now looking even more like an alien I dosed the entrance to the wasp nest with the "Vape" powder the nest being in the very top left hand corner of our front room window in the wall cavity; this morning just the odd wasp buzzing around.

    No doubt another round of problems await me for tomorrow but I'm well past caring; bring them on?

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
    Retired, Sep 15, 2018 at 7:49 PM
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    Hi,

    Here's my reaction to self levelling compound;

    Kind regards, Colin.

    Porch floor_005.JPG Porch floor_006.JPG
     
    Retired, Sep 16, 2018 at 3:51 PM
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    Ian Administrator

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    What a shame, I thought self-levelling compound would have been ideal for this. Do you think it just needed to be a bit thicker, or was it just a crap product?
     
    Ian, Sep 17, 2018 at 11:42 AM
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    Hi,

    Thanks Ian. As I'm new to self levelling compounds I'm not really qualified to say what went wrong; possibly me or possibly the product but self levelling it didn't and it was riddled with air bubbles.

    Bron and I have just returned from another tile merchant in Huddersfield; this time I had more clue as to what I wanted and the guy in this store was most pleasant and highly helpful. I explained my horror story and although he sympathised he suggested this time I try a different brand of self levelling compound and highly recommended Tilemaster LevelFlex which levels from 3mm up to 50mm in one go; he added the compound I had used although he stocks it he seldom sells it; however he did say a customer who had used the Tilemaster was not only delighted with it but he bought another twelve bags for another job and will stick in future with Tilemaster levelling compound; I bought a 20kg bag.

    I also bought Tilemaster Rapid SetaFlex adhesive this suitable for laying up to 12mm thick; I had previously been sold adhesive at the other supplier on the understanding I wanted to level a slope at 12mm but when I checked the bag today it's only suitable up to a maximum 6mm so I was sold the wrong adhesive but its going back for a refund.

    When I lay this new levelling compound I'll actually ensure it is indeed level this time; I can't stand another nightmare like I suffered yesterday. I learn things the hard way; I'll post the results in due course. Tilemaster manufacture an adhesive suitable for up to 25mm thick in one go but obtaining it is rather difficult hence I'll have another go with the levelling compound.

    One thing I won't do this time is mix the full bag of compound with water then carry the lot in one go up into the bungalow; I'll split it and use a bucket; it sure is heavy stuff.

    Years ago I did a lot of wall plastering over random stone but into framework and I used the frames for gauging; I think I'll use the same technique which is shown below for applying the tile adhesive.

    Kind regards, Colin.

     
    Retired, Sep 17, 2018 at 5:37 PM
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    Ian Administrator

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    Hope the new stuff does the trick - I'd be interested to hear your results, as I may be using some self-levelling compound early next year. I'll go for the same stuff if it works well :).
     
    Ian, Sep 18, 2018 at 10:31 AM
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    Hi,

    Thanks Ian; I'll certainly post the results once I've completed the job. I'm a novice to laying floor tiles so its highly likely I'll be doing things wrong until I gain a bit of experience but I do follow instructions when I'm doing something new.

    The self levelling floor compound I had the problem with was Mapei bought at Screwfix quite cheaply; this receives generally decent reviews and I've since done a bit more research; the concrete slab I poured onto is over 50 years old and in perfect condition; it is very clean indeed but I didn't apply a bonding agent before pouring the compound so if this is important then I'll put my hand up and admit my mistake; I'll never condemn a product or manufacturer if there is a chance I'm at fault.

    The pour appeared to go down well and it headed for the low spots so I wrongly assumed all to be well never having used self levelling compound previously; after allowing the compound to harden/dry overnight I was keen to look at the results the following morning; I could have cried when I inspected it because it was such an outstanding failure; not only did it fail to self level there were thousands of small humps which had been bubbles forming small hard domes and when scraped hard to remove these small holes appeared leaving the surface looking more like a sponge.

    Would applying bonding agent have prevented the bubbles appearing and also would the bonding agent assist with the self levelling? The weather here at the moment is terrible and forecast same for a few days but whilst I'm waiting for better weather I've been doing my homework because I want to avoid a second failure.

    http://www.tilemasteradhesives.co.u...s/primeplus-flexible-primer-and-bonding-agent

    This morning I bought a litre of Primeplus through eBay which is due in the next couple of days; I'm making certain I use only Tilemaster products this time and I'll read all instructions and adhere to them before doing any pouring. I've also watched YouTube videos where spiked rollers are used running the roller over the wet compound to minimise air bubbles? Hopefully the compound will behave because I don't have a spiked roller and other videos show compound being poured without use of such a roller? I'm an experienced glass fiber laminator and we always used washer type rollers to consolidate the resin and mat in order to remove air but this self levelling compound is a liquid for want of a better term and should flow if mixed as per manufacturer's instructions; I'm using a tall round plastic container and a power paddle mounted in my big Bosch drill for the mixing so I know the actual mix to be OK.

    I confess I'm nervous using self levelling compound a second time; yesterday I endured a really bad day with both my hips giving me pain after the previous nightmare day taking up the wayward compound using hammer and chisel; it was incredibly hard graft; I have a big Titan SDS drill I could have used in chisel mode but this would also have resulted in a lot of hard graft but with less control so I suffered using the hammer and chisel.

    Lets see how I get on the second time; if I go missing I'll have jumped from a bridge. A second failure with this compound doesn't stand thinking about? :(

    No doubt a flooring contractor would laugh at such a small job and my feeble attempts while I'm on a steep learning curve but usually we all start from little or no experience; in my favour once I've done such a job I don't forget. The fall is 18mm and I'll be happy if I can bring up to level the point where the batten touches to the 18mm depth then the adhesive will do the rest. At only around two square metres working space is tight and I don't want to contaminate our carpets so I won't be paddling around; the inner door swings clear but the outer door swings over the concrete. Possible another mistake I could have made was to pour from the high spot letting the compound run downhill; this time I'll pour in the deepest part and let the compound creep up to its level? I'm learning all the time but this is a type of job a DIY'er seldom does.

    At least you'll have more information now Ian than I had before I started; hope it helps you and others?

    Kind regards, Colin.

    DSC00967.JPG
    18mm fall. Very clean old concrete.

    DSC00968.JPG
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2018 at 5:04 PM
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    I've normally had good experience with Mapei products - it's probably the product I'd have bought myself as it happens.

    Fingers crossed for the 2nd go :). I wonder if using the self levelling compound on a floor that hasn't been sealed/primed with a bonding agent could indeed be the problem - as it'll be quite dry in comparison. The only other thing I can think of is if the compound was mixed at really high speed and it churned up a lot of bubbles.

    Hopefully it'll warm up a bit in time for the eBay delivery :D.
     
    Ian, Sep 19, 2018 at 11:09 AM
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    Hi,

    Many thanks Ian. :) You could be right on both counts regarding the dry concrete and mixing speed. This is why I won't blame the product which would be most unfair if the problem lays with me.

    Perhaps the bonding agents helps the compound to "flow" as well as creating a tight bond between compound and concrete; on the second attempt bonding agent is going to be applied hence eliminating this risk; as to mixing speed I used my big Bosch drill at slow speed it being a variable speed drill so I possibly did this bit right but I'll also ensure the second mix is mixed slowly. Hindsight is wonderful isn't it and experience only comes with making every mistake possible before getting it right; I'm good at mistakes.:(

    On a happier note our best friends have just paid us a visit and David has kindly offered to loan me his tile cutting machine saying he can bring it to Rufforth Auto Jumble in a couple of weeks when we'll be meeting up unless I decide to use my angle grinders in the meantime; our friends live 80 miles distant from us; I'd buy a tile cutting machine but it seems over the top just for this small porch and I don't believe in hiring.

    Gale is here again trying to blow the bungalow off the valley side and Blackie is forecast for heavy rain; Blackie my constant black cloud doesn't understand light rain.

    This porch is one project I've not enjoyed and I'll be glad when its finally completed; it looks excellent but its taken a lot out of me.

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
    Retired, Sep 19, 2018 at 1:37 PM
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    Hi,

    Absolutely nothing has gone right with this porch project and it continues. I've installed 8" tall house numbers above our new front door and have huge numbers displayed on the front wall of the bungalow so no mistaking our bungalow for visitors or deliveries?

    Well both MyHermes and now DPD have found a new way of bypassing these numbers; they now deliver to wrong addresses. Yesterday DPD were to deliver a parcel between 1:30 & 2:30; I received an email declaring missed delivery; both Bron and I were home and the car on the driveway. Looking closer at the message I found a picture of a door with a letterbox and also it stated a card had been pushed through the letterbox. This to prove delivery had been attempted so top marks DPD for this. Pity it wasn't our front door or letterbox so no card either?

    Has any member ever tried to contact DPD;I think contacting the dead would be easier?

    I've just received another DPD email stating delivery this afternoon between 12:20 & 1:20 if its the same delivery driver will I need to cruise the area trying to find the front door and letterbox shown in yesterday's picture?

    I wonder why I get out of bed each day.

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
    Retired, Sep 21, 2018 at 10:05 AM
    #16
  17. Retired

    Retired

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    Hi,

    How hard can it be to receive a delivery? Tried to deliver to wrong address yesterday; deliver today around 12:30 is this becoming just one huge hassle; now this;

    Duff by name..JPG
    Stop the planet I want to get off.

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
    Retired, Sep 21, 2018 at 12:25 PM
    #17
  18. Retired

    Ian Administrator

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    That's a shame, as DPD have always been excellent for me - I really like the 1 hour time slots and online map tracking. It sounds like whoever did your local area ran out of time and snapped a random photo of a door so he didn't get in to trouble with his/her boss. When DPD have left parcels for me (Amazon too, more recently), they've taken a photo of where they leave it and e-mail it to me if I'm out.
     
    Ian, Sep 21, 2018 at 2:26 PM
    #18
    Retired likes this.
  19. Retired

    Retired

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    Hi,

    Thanks Ian; I understand the pressures upon courier companies; I was employed in an ultra busy despatch for 24 years ending up in charge of it. This parcel problem is only one example of our continuing bad luck which never lets up. The parcel though has finally arrived and I agree the usual one hour time slot given and the photo taken by DPD are very useful; the problem being compounded by my constant companion Blackie who at the moment is putting down an extremely heavy shower of rain. Everything these days seems to be rush and stress; I came down with shingles at work which made me realize to walk away from the stress before being carried away?

    All the courier companies are under a lot of pressure and as the pressure increases so do the problems.

    I've just received a soaking as I left the workshop to come up to the bungalow but I'm happy because I've now used my new 12" DeWalt thicknesser in anger; nice machine.

    Onto the next problem. :)

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
    Retired, Sep 21, 2018 at 3:04 PM
    #19
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