Neighbour dispute over wall


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Hi all,

Me and my partner bought our first home 2 months ago, the person we bought the house from also lives behind us.

Our back garden wall has a problem though, there is a piece sticking out which really restricts us from putting anything there (ideally we would like the shed to go here). I have been advised from family members that this isn't a supporting wall and is a builder mistake, it looks as if the builders thought it was where the wall was MEANT to stop to be in line with our house. I have asked the neighbour (and seller) if we can remove this piece of wall and she says no because it's a supporting wall. This also wasn't in our contract when we signed.

I'll attach 3 images, 1 of the wall, 1 of the plan we SIGNED and 1 of the document we received from the seller AFTER we had moved in. Can anyone advise on what's best to do and if this is actually a supporting wall?

Any help appreciated :)
 

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If it is a supporting wall, what is it supporting?

Welcome to the forum
The wall carries on to next door, BUT next doors wall is appropriately supported. Not sure what they're being fussy about, we have offered to pay for the removal and promised to make it as clean as possible. They can't see it anyway!

Thanks :)
 
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Any reasonably high wall, to avoid the issue of wind damage mainly should have a minimum return (like what you have in your picture, every 12metres. Structurally it seems there is no reason for this requirement in your case. There vis a support just to the right ;-). If the support is bonded into the wall (ie, brickwork is bonded in, then you cold dismantle the support and patch up the brick wall. Not sure if it is a single leaf wall (which is more vulnerable than double brick....PS> Did you know that a single leaf wall can be built 27 times its width before you need to make it not susceptible to buckling. What is behind the wall?
 
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Any reasonably high wall, to avoid the issue of wind damage mainly should have a minimum return (like what you have in your picture, every 12metres. Structurally it seems there is no reason for this requirement in your case. There vis a support just to the right ;-). If the support is bonded into the wall (ie, brickwork is bonded in, then you cold dismantle the support and patch up the brick wall. Not sure if it is a single leaf wall (which is more vulnerable than double brick....PS> Did you know that a single leaf wall can be built 27 times its width before you need to make it not susceptible to buckling. What is behind the wall?
Thank you, that's helpful. My father told me that what was to the right is also a support for the wall as well. The piece of wall sticking out IS NOT joined to the back wall, so it could literally be be sliced off in theory. Behind the wall is the ladies garden, just bushes and greenery.

I have a feeling the neighbour just cannot be bothered with the hassle and isn't understanding what I want to do!
 
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...it looks like the two brick returns have been designed in to support what is a long wall? Yes they may have missed your boundary line but moving it to the boundary, aside from being tricky and time consuming might not be allowed (would this make you liable for any resulting failure and your house insurance void? Speak to the local Council Building Regs people (it wont require planning approval) It is typically something which the Council 'may' need to approve under a Building Notice, (less than £80 depending on your authority) to help you remain within the laws of insurance too.
 
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the government produce Approved Documents A through to P (Volume A, by its very letter, is for Structure and implies the importance of Structure!). It can be seen as overkill when you read it but complying with this makes your application for alterations sound proof. (By example having a minimum number of brick returns every set distance apart. You could get a Structural engineer to 'prove that the oval recess , bonded to the wall close by is effectively providing a buttress support of types and remove the said return altogether but the fact the retuyn is there suggests it is probably needed to pass as structurally sound
 
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Structurally it appears TOTALLY unnecessary. It has almost certainly been built to form enclosures for bins, garden belongings, compost heap, etc. Wait for your neighbour to go out one day and just knock it down.
 

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