Outside Tap

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Drains' started by Amelia, Oct 29, 2018.

  1. Amelia

    Amelia

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    We have replaced our outside tap with a new one but when you screw it on the thread leaves it upside down! Either that or you don’t turn it all the way - tap is facing downwards but you have a leak all over the wall because the seal is loose. Any ideas please as I don’t want a wet wall especially in the colder weather.

    Thanks!
     
    Amelia, Oct 29, 2018
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  2. Amelia

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    Hi,

    Fibre washers come in various thicknesses and these are what I use. :) Good luck.

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
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  3. Amelia

    Amelia

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    Thank you so much Colin! Much appreciated!

    Amelia
     
    Amelia, Oct 29, 2018
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  4. Amelia

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    Hi,

    You're most welcome Amelia. Another dodge is to wind the tap on leaving a small gap at the flange then add turns of string into the gap then tighten the tap into position; it might take a number of attempts to get it just right; there are a number of options so stick with it and you'll win.:)

    Below are pictures of our outside tap with a couple of suggestions which might be of interest.

    Kind regards, Colin.

    104_0094.JPG
    Please note fibre washer at the joint.

    104_0095.JPG
    When I installed the tap years ago I secured it to a mounting board taking a lot of care to get everything aligned; the tap is vertical and the top of the tap is the same height as the top of the mounting board; this allowed me to make a simple wooden cover which rests on the top of the board and top of the tap; plenty of good quality paint protects both the mounting board and cover. The cover inside is the same size as the mounting board. I like to spend a bit of time thinking how can I improve any job I do.

    104_0096.JPG

    The wooden cover in place affording frost/ice protection. In summer (?) the cover is removed and stored in the shed.
     
    Retired, Oct 29, 2018
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  5. Amelia

    Amelia

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    Thank you so much Colin that’s such a help. I’ll get a fibre washer and some string. It was great to see the photo too because now I understand where the washer goes. And the cover for the tap is brilliant. So neat!
    I’ll let you know how I get on,
    Amelia
     
    Amelia, Oct 30, 2018
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  6. Amelia

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    Hi,

    I'm pleased to have been of help Amelia. I was taught the old fashioned way as an apprentice to actually make things using my head and hands. This tap problem is very common and confusing to anyone faced with it for the first time so a bit more information might be useful.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/GASKET-P...2:g:rAYAAOSwNJpbftXw:rk:2:pf:1&frcectupt=true

    If I don't have a suitable fibre washer to hand then I can easily make one using gasket material as seen at the link above. Years ago I made many paper gaskets for my motorcycles these looking impossible to make at home but are quite easy to make. Crankcase; gearbox and rocker box gaskets all with precise holes very easy made by laying the paper on the joint face and tapping around the edges and the edges of the holes with a small spanner resulted in a perfectly fitting gasket costing nothing other than a bit of time and patience. I was making paper gaskets over 50 years ago before YouTube and before computers but here is a video showing the technique; I used a small spanner on the paper gaskets this cutting the holes too.



    I tend to ramble on but many old skills are dying out as older generations pass away; we now live in a throw away society when many things that could be easily repaired are dumped.

    If you have the tap in your hand then pop into any plumbing store taking the tap along and explain you need a fibre washer because the tap won't line up buy a few because they are cheap; the store assistants are usually most helpful so no need to feel embarrassed or timid after all no one is born with skill or experience.

    Yes please let's know how you get on then others can benefit from your experiences. :)

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
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  7. Amelia

    Amelia

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    Hi Colin, I have just replied to your email and the system has wiped everything I wrote so I’ve got to start again from scratch!

    I agree with you about people not learning practical skills anymore. Actually there was a feature on this on Jeremy Vine on radio 2 on Tuesday, I think. Apparently an eminent teacher doctor - called Mr Kneebone! - has written a paper which says that the medical students who come to him to learn surgery do not have the required dexterity to be competent surgeons. They have not learnt to sew or take their toys apart and put them back together so they are not very good with their hands, In this technological age they can only swipe screens and press buttons. A bit worrying for the future! A sewing teacher was on who said these things have been taken off the curriculum and she has started her own project teaching people to mend and alter their clothes rather than throwing them away.

    I have been so lucky that my parents have taught me so many skills over the years and I enjoy putting them to use so much round the house and garden, making and mending things. It gives you so much satisfaction and self-reliance and I think if you are solving practical problems it helps you to learn how to solve other problems in life.

    A funny thing happened on Tuesday when I read your email because as a family we had spent the day dealing with a very difficult person who is exactly like the quote on your profile - so poor that all they have is money. It made us smile because it summed them up so well. So thank you for helping us without realising you would!

    We’re off to buy a fibre washer tomorrow so I will let you know how we get on with the next episode of the tap saga!
    Amelia
     
    Amelia, Nov 2, 2018
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  8. Amelia

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    Hi,

    Well done Amelia in having a go at doing things yourself; small successes build confidence and in no time at all bigger jobs can be undertaken.

    Regarding modern teaching I don't know what is taught these days; certainly as you say no practical skills; I've bought machines from schools that were no longer needed and fully restored them; a time is coming in the UK when no one will know how to make the buttons to press; listening to some kids I wonder how they manage to dress themselves?

    Your tap problem is easy for me to sort out but is confusing to people doing it for the first time; it's also very easy to forget we who are experienced started at the bottom; never ever be afraid to ask questions; it used to be said at work; "better to remain quiet and let others think you are a fool than to speak up and prove you are a fool" I must be the dumbest stupidest individual on the planet because I've always openly asked the silly questions others dare not ask. :)

    Sorting your tap out Amelia is a new experience for you; here's my latest new experience; I'm restoring two vintage coach lamps and both are so bad they need new reflectors; I'm used to lathe work having used lathes for around 55 years but I've never attempted metal spinning; so far I've been unsuccessful but instead of moaning and quitting I'm learning from each and every mistake; I never fail because I always learn something new with everything I attempt to do; I know if I stick with it I'll win in the end however long it takes but I make lots of mistakes along the way; it's called a steep learning curve. Below are a few pictures of progress so far; yes it's progress because although things aren't going as expected I'm making the mistakes and learning all the time; I enjoy leaving my comfort zone way behind me as I try new things for the first time; many would see the results so far a failure and give up but I'm as stubborn as they come and hopefully I'll be posting a success story in the near future in the meantime I'll make every mistake possible and even make the same mistake a number of times so I hope my ramblings encourage you further.

    Kind regards, Colin.

    Metal spinning._001.JPG
    Turning the wooden plug/mandrel to the required shape on my fully restored Union Graduate lathe.

    Metal spinning._002.JPG
    First attempt spinning aluminium taught me a great deal; it can only get better.

    Metal spinning._003.JPG
    More metal spinning attempts; I'm getting quicker at destroying metal.

    Metal spinning._004.JPG

    Wrong grade of aluminium; wrong lathe speed; wrong tool manipulation; wrong lubricant; wrong tool to use and of course the main problem is wrong me but I'm not only learning something totally new to me I'm enjoying it and since first starting I've learned so many ways of how not to do metal spinning.
     
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  9. Amelia

    Amelia

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    Hi Colin,

    IT WORKED! The tap is completely dry and so is the wall. Thank you so much for all your help - I have really learned a lot!

    Can I come back to you in the future if I have any other problems?!

    Amelia
     
    Amelia, Nov 6, 2018
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  10. Amelia

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    Hi,

    You're so welcome Amelia and I'm delighted you've sorted the tap out; for those of us with lots of experience such a job as your tap problem would be done automatically but when it comes to doing such a job for the first time it's very daunting and as in your case with the tap wetting the wall it really did need sorting out sooner rather than later; all leaks need treating seriously.

    Of course you can come back with any such problems/questions because we all had to start from scratch so ask away; I'm just surprised other members didn't jump in with suggestions but a nice ending. This forum is the place to ask any DIY questions but please also feel free to send me a message if you think I can help.

    I've had a workshop many years but can still make absolutely stupid mistakes and even make the same mistake a number of times. A few years ago I was installing cushion floor covering in our bathroom and in order to make life easier I removed the toilet pan saving lots of hassle trimming around it. With the cushion floor laid I wiped the flooring clean using bucket and cloth; I emptied the bucket into the now installed pan and flushed the toilet to end up with a waterfall of water; I had forgotten to connect the pan to the cistern; I couldn't believe it when after mopping up the water squeezing the cloth out into the pan I flushed again but still hadn't connected the pan to the cistern; I should never be let out without an adult? Never be afraid to ask Amelia. :)

    I'm heading into the workshop keen to improve my metal spinning.

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2018
    Retired, Nov 7, 2018
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