Makita Trimmer RT0700C router.


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Hi,

I openly confess I'm a tool/machinery junkie and there's no known cure and no help with rehabilitation either.

about 40 years ago I bought my first router it being a fixed base single speed B&D; I only used it once and detested how it threw dust and chips at me also the screaming noise it made; I quickly sold it on.

It must be 10 years ago that I bought my second B&D router; this is a lot different with variable speed and plunge making it a lot more user friendly; I've used this quite a few times but still couldn't call myself a router convert.

Seeing big Erbauer 2,100W variable speed plunge routers at Screwfix for around £90 each I decided to buy one; it's not the best of heavyweight routers but is capable of removing stock quickly with one pass; now I was getting somewhere and by now I had the safety kit I needed so the noise to me at least wasn't overbearing. I've since made a router table and this Erbauer is permanently attached but I've also bought a second clone Erbauer intending to make a better more permanent router table. One major drawback with these Erbauers is lack of plunge travel and with standard length cutters it's difficult getting the cutter to protrude enough even with the base fully plunged; just a small but important point and the only thing I really dislike about these Erbauers; on the whole though they offer excellent value without causing bankruptcy.

During a visit to Rufforth Auto Jumble near York I noticed a brand new boxed Lidl type router at only £15 so I bought it but it takes 3/8" shank cutters; I've stripped this and use it as a very high speed diamond hone for sharpening my carbide tipped tooling; at the price nothing lost but although rated at 1,250W it's way down on power.

Four years ago I needed hundreds of feet of moulding and this would have cost a fortune to buy so I set the big Erbauer up and ran the moulding in little time with little effort even though it generated a huge mess without extraction; I was most impressed and am now coming to realize just how useful a router is.

Then I bought a beast of a router costing around £300 this is my big Makita again at 2,100W but this really is powerful and well worth the money; it's built to last many years and the one I now use for heavy work; it feels solid and is a pleasure to own and use.

My latest router has just arrived today; I've fancied a palm router for a while so finally have bought one. It's another Makita classed as a trimmer RT0700C. I'm mightily impressed by this small router; it's heavy for its size and feels like a quality machine; I've not yet used it but I'll soon be finding work for it; this palm router will be ideal for small jobs where the big routers are rather too unwieldy; it cost £107 delivered; lots of these palm routers are available from around £30 but I like Makita kit finding it well worth the initial cost. I'm gearing up for our oncoming 9 month long winter where I intend to hide from the world's problems and the dire Yorkshire weather in my workshop. I think I'm now OK for routers but it won't stop me buying other kit I fancy. ;)

Just passing a bit of time whilst it's raining and a black hole again.

Kind regards, Colin.

Routing moulding_0001.JPG


Erbauer 2,100W router in action. I needed over 300' of moulding for framework for our front room; needing to mould both edges this meant over 600' feet of moulding to run and I'd never attempted anything like this previously so I dreamt up this idea which worked a treat.

Routing moulding_0002.JPG


If I'm going to mess up my usually clean and tidy workshop I might as well make a good job of it.

Routing moulding_0003.JPG


Running this moulding was incredibly easy once everything was set up' all I needed to do was push the long lengths of softwood timber through; the router switch on the router handle was securely tied with string keeping it permanently switched on; I controlled the router safely from the switched 13A wall socket

Routing moulding_0004.JPG


I've since sold the Startrite combination woodworking machine having completed all the heavy woodworking jobs.

Routing moulding_0005.JPG


Here's the tunnel I made allowing perfect alignment as I pushed the lengths of timber through. This was a real success and proved to be a rapid way of moulding.

Routing moulding_0006.JPG


A nice long run in to align the timber and a push stick to ensure I retained all my fingers. This Erbauer did a remarkable job and wasn't at all stressed cutting the moulding at full depth in a single pass giving a nice clean profile. Just a bit of thought and time to make the guide jig proved well worth while.

I've since done other routing this time using the big Makita; I made our front room fireplace mantle from MDF and am very pleased with it; the mantle and the lengths of timber moulded with the Erbauer can be seen below; common softwood and 18mm thick MDF can completely transform a room. I thoroughly enjoy such projects but now after 33 years I consider our bungalow to be as we want it.

Front room_0001.JPG
 
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That's a really nice jig setup - I bet you got some nice cuts with those nice long guide rails.

I've been tempted by a palm router for a long while, but always made do with my large Bosch one. It's the Ryobi Ono+ palm router that tempted me, as although I'd normally avoid battery powered tools for anything that needs some grunt, I'd probably make a lot of use of it on small jobs (trimming edges, etc...) if it doesn't need to be plugged in.

Please do keep us posted on what you think of the palm router, Colin! I bet you'll be happy with your purchase!
 
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Hi,

Thanks Ian; yes the cuts were excellent even going full depth in one pass which speeded the job up; by setting up the router as I did it ensured repeatable accuracy however many lengths of timber were pushed through; this was important when it came to cutting the many frame mitre joints; all I had to do was to feed the timber at a good speed which prevented any burning.

For the front room dado rail and panel frames this was the router cutter profile I used (Roman ogee) 1/2" shank cutter allowing full depth cut.

Routed end profile..JPG


I ran over 600' of moulding very quickly indeed; 300' of moulding but as each edge was to be moulded it doubled the actual routing length; doing this freehand using the big router would have been tiring and definitely not as accurate. Mitred half lap joints were used these securely glued and clamped until the glue set; I did two panels at a time using the clamps I had. The frames were nailed directly to the wall using lost head nails and the nail head holes filled using Toupret filler which is absolutely brilliant. The pictures in post #1 show the finished frames fully installed.

I always take the time to make accurate jigs if I'm doing any repetitive work; these jigs are always worth the time to make saving lots of time in the long run; the downside of using a jig is it's got to be perfect because any mistake is repeated on every item being made.

Here's another router jig I made and used whilst making wainscot paneling to the master bedroom;

Router template guide (3).JPG


I had lots of half lap joints with mitred moulding to make; the paper template represents the timber joint to be routed.

Router template guide (1).JPG


Here's the jig in action; again I've used two side guides where I simply slide the timber in and nip it in exact position with a cramp to prevent the router displacing it during routing; using jigs ensures everything aligns but jigs can be disastrous too if poorly constructed.

Master bedroom._0001.JPG


Wainscot paneling being assembled in our master bedroom whilst I gave the bedroom a comprehensive makeover. Lots of accurate joints needed and the jig really did come into its own.

Master bedroom._0002.JPG


Electrics sorted and new wainscot paneling installed awaiting paint. Paint used was Dulux Diamond White.

Master bedroom._0003.JPG


I didn't fancy trying to brush or roller paint the wainscot paneling or the new coffered ceiling which can be seen using a brush and roller so I bought an Apollo sprayer; masked everything not to be painted and sprayed the paint on giving a top professional finish; a new carpet completed the makeover.

It's surprising how much money can be saved doing such work oneself avoiding expensive labour costs; the wainscot panels are just big sheets of 6mm thick MDF with "V" grooves added using the router. The framework is common joinery grade softwood bought in full lengths from our local timber yard and routed adding a bead profile hence the need for the mitred joints; it seemed to take as long planning and measuring as it did to do the job but but like our front room both have been worth it. We often have visitors who tell us "I can't do that" I failed woodworking at school and for four years never looked forward to woodworking class 2 hours each week but over the years and with lots of practice I now love woodworking and projects like this bedroom and front room makeovers are quite a bit different to simply slapping on a coat of paint or wallpaper. The coffered ceiling I don't regard as a project for a novice; it took a while before the blood returned back into my arms and hands.

I may as well ramble on a bit more because the weather is dire and I'd like to encourage beginners to have a go at woodworking but start with small simple projects then build up confidence and experience; I was rubbish at woodworking but with years of practice these are my results.

Never be scared or put off having a go; others will always be negative not wishing to do anything themself but also not wishing you to succeed; prove them wrong and enjoy yourself doing so things aren't so difficult with a bit of up front research and getting stuck in.

I'll add a bit more regarding making mouldings in the next post.

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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Hi,

Not routing but making mouldings a different way.

Other methods of producing wooden moulds can also be used; our friend and neighbour Carole living next door needed lengths of wooden moulding to match profiles already installed but no longer available so I made some for her enjoying a bit of quality workshop time;

Caroles two mouldings (9).JPG


Here's Carole's first moulding I did. A shallow cove and a bead each side; the cove was cut on the table saw taking light passes with each cut; no recommended for a novice this can be very dangerous.

Caroles two mouldings (1).JPG


The complete set up on the saw bench.

Caroles two mouldings (6).JPG


A basic home made scratch stock using offcuts of ply and an old hacksaw blade the blade ground to the required profile. Not at all difficult to make and costing nothing other than a bit of time.

Caroles two mouldings (5).JPG


The scratch stock in action; this is an ancient way of producing assorted moulding profiles used before electricity.

Caroles two mouldings (3).JPG


Completed length of moulding with original profile shown on right. Just an offcut of softwood ripped down on the table saw; I enjoyed making this.

Caroles two mouldings (13).JPG


Here's the second moulding profile Carole needed this time a short length of picture rail; blank roughed out ready. Expensive power tools aren't always needed; hand tools and methods produce the same end result but obviously take a lot more time; it's nice to keep the old hand skills alive. Enough for now I've a bit of painting to do in the workshop so time to get off my backside.

When I use the new Router Ian I'll be happy to post results.

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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Oh my word, that must have taken quite a bit of time to get those matching profiles - especially if you used a scratch stock and cut that cove with shallow passes. You have more patience than I, Colin :D.

I've got matching skirting moulding all around the house (it's an old Georgian style) and I'm dreading the day that I need to get more in (kitchen renovation, bathroom re-jig, etc...). I found a supplier a few years ago and bought some lengths in just in case, as I have no idea how I can recreate a complex design easily. I might be a few more lengths next time I pass by ;).
 
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Hi,

Many thanks Ian; over the years I've learned to have lots of patience but I've also been taught the old fashioned ways and methods of making things initially whilst as an apprentice mechanical engineer; this was proper engineering not fitting; we used to make parts/components no longer available so never had to rely on outside help.

It's very satisfying though to replicate something that is long obsolete and to stand back with personal satisfaction having succeeded. There's so much money around these days people are encouraged to be lazy simply dumping anything broken and replacing with new; I like to encourage anyone into repairing; often it's something trivial costing very little; I dislike anything with batteries or circuit boards but things like old cast iron machines and electric motors can be brought back into full service just by changing the bearings; a lick of paint makes a huge difference to a tatty machine.

I'm definitely a dinosaur when it comes to old skills; these days I don't understand TV remote controls which always torment me; we recently bought a new "Smart" TV but it's not smart at all; it took eight days of frustration to get it working something like it should and it still has a mind of its own forever winding the big key up in my back; I always considered electric as quick but this new TV takes about the same length of time to fire up as my fully restored 1957 Ekco TV/radio this being a vintage valve set; so many useless channels and endless apps no doubt need to be loaded before the usual rubbish appears. The TV is unaided by the Virgin media router and Tivo box adding to the complications; give me steam power and line shafts any day at least I'm at home with these.

https://skirtingsrus.co.uk/skirting-boards/mdf-skirting-board/large-mdf-skirting-boards/

You might get lucky with your skirting profile; lots of these old profiles are available but in MDF although if painted they are a good substitute; to make your own though shouldn't be too difficult using a circular saw and router; the profile will need breaking into smaller sections allowing a number of router cutters to copy; a piece of abrasive paper makes a good job of blending in profiles. My difficulties aren't in making anything but in buying decent materials; modern softwood timber is very poor indeed; I only need to buy a length of 6" x 1" timber and leave it in the dry workshop where in a few days it moves so much I'm surprised it doesn't escape. Reclaimed timber used to be available everywhere and was usually good and stable but even this is now hard to source and costly. I've brought broken pallets home these being made of better quality timber than the timber now being sold.

I know I ramble on about times gone by but how many these days are remotely interested in using their head and hands to actually make or create anything; emphasis is placed on sport of one kind or another; it's a pity the same effort and resources are put into our failing manufacturing industry; the UK is turning into the third world.

Forums such as this do help to encourage self help but it should start at home and continue through school years; I can dream on. I often post the same pictures but only for the benefit of new forum members; better repeated than lost.

Two years ago I made and installed our new porch to the bungalow front; this involved a bit of router work as I made the panel wooden beading.

Kind regards, Colin.

New porch_0001.JPG


I've enjoyed a lifetime of DIY saving us a fortune doing work ourselves; this new porch I made and installed is what I'd call DIY; the cladding above and below the front bedroom window is 18mm thick WBP plywood having been profiled with the big router. The decking I installed many years ago. The coach lamp is one of a pair I extensively restored involving me learning metal spinning. If only youngster's could be weaned away from endless sport and computers to do DIY I'm sure obesity would fall and set them up for life. I'm not at all clever or smart because I still make lots of silly mistakes but from each mistake I learn. Enough preaching from me I'm just disappointed by the way things are going.
 
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Ah Colin, another great article.
You should write a book.
Eat your heart out, Barry Bucknall.
I can see attention to detail throughout.
A manager once told me to look at the bigger picture, but that's what managers are for.
What really counts is attention to detail - get that right and the rest follows. Managers are generalists, experts do detail.
Would I want an NHS manager doing brain surgery?
Routers. Yes, worth their weight in gold. There's the brute - a Trend T12. Saved it's cost in worktop joints alone.
Then there's the versatile - 1/4" Elu 96 Swiss made.
Then there's the Bosch trimmer/palm router - mainly for free-hand or worktop edging (remember to oil the guide bearing)
I haven't had a tradesman in since 1987 when the Michael Fish gale took off some rooftiles - I still do my own.
The advantages of DIY are endless. You pick the time and date; you pick the materials; you do it to your standards; you aren't factoring in the cost of running a business and so on.
The difference between a tradesman and a DIY'er is that a tradesman practices at your expense.
My mantra is the three "T"s - Time, Techniques and Tools.
When you mention DIY to younger generations, you often get the glib answer of "I leave it to the experts".
Why not just say "I don't know how, I'm not prepared to learn, I don't like getting my hands dirty, I don't know which end of the screwdriver to use, no-one taught me how".
In the post war years, DIY wasn't a leisure pursuit, it was a necessity.
I learnt everything from my father, a skilled craftsman. He used to repair bombers and fighters in the RAF in Italy and the Middle East.
The school taught woodwork and metalwork. One teacher was a model aircraft fanatic. It was heaven-sent.
I'm proud to have one school report from a lady teacher that says "spends more time on model aeroplanes than mental arithmetic".
That didn't stop me having a long career in the sciences and technology.
Triang railways, Keil Kraft kits etc. meant I didn't need to be torn away from the TV.
DIY has saved me tens of thousands of pounds. Kitchens, bathrooms, windows, doors, soffits, gutters, fascias, bargeboards etc. etc. Not a nail in sight, all detailed and recorded. I won't list the trips to A&E though, but you learn from them. Falling out of the loft was the worst. Not my fault entirely, the loft ladder gave way. Broken pelvis end result.
Mind you, tradesmen do it too. My neighbours son, a plumber, cut through what he thought was a lead water pipe - it was a lead sheathed electricity supply cable, the sort that had lead on the outside as the earth. Lucky to be alive.
The hate of DIY is a British thing. The Americans still do it and are big "makers".
Mentioning "smart" TVs reminds me just how bad my "smart" TV is. It isn't smart. It has stopped doing things and Samsung don't want to know.
Smart is the next new thing as if you hadn't noticed.
I do electronics as well. I program things and they do useful things for me.
I don't need "smart" meters because I do my own, plus I know how they work and they are very repairable.
Too much, especially electronic stuff is designed in a rush, under-specified, cheap components and if repairable at all, cost more to fix than to replace.
A radio valve you just changed, early transistors the same. Now you need a microscope just to find the transistors.
The real killer is code, the programming that makes everything from you car to your boiler work. And it's all secret.
But clever people can unravel it (not me)
Yes, we live in difficult times, too many people, too much stuff. Corona virus thrives on it. One little bit of RNA code can bring a planet to its knees. Stop eating bats and pangolins and let them get on with their lives.
 
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Hi,

WOW piglet; you too should write a book you're heading in the right direction. ;) I couldn't agree more with your comments and outlook on life in general. Yes we used to be a great nation in fact the best nation in the world after all the industrial revolution started here but look at us now. How many get their hands dirty doing DIY and how many actually know what DIY stands for. Over the last few years I've noticed a trend whereby our gals are taking over DIY whilst our guys are content to watch someone play with a ball. Few father's these days have skills to pass down to their son's. We're turning into an idle nation wanting money but do nothing for it only hold out an hand if it isn't too much trouble.

My late father worked on Lancaster bomber final assembly whilst my late mother worked in munitions during the war so obviously something must have rubbed off on me; the real skills though were taught to me by The National Coal Board whilst I was apprenticed with them and over the years I've gathered many skills on a need to know basis; anyone can learn if they want to and it's never been easier through the web and wonderful YouTube. I used to buy lots of books covering woodworking/metalworking and started off with very poor quality tools often bought at our local market; looking back I shudder to think how I ever coped with these tools the saws so bad they blistered my hands but I did lots of work with them.

I like the way the American's do DIY; they knock a nail in by firing up a huge compressor and using an equally huge nail gun; many have massive workshops which here in the UK would bankrupt us to pay the council tax on them. One thing Americans can't do is to spell or pronounce words correctly; Sodder is Solder to us it having an "L" and what's Aloooominum? American's also appear to have endless stocks of good quality timber at cheap prices; here all we do is get ripped off with taxes hardly encouraging anyone to do anything; success here is a crime and frowned upon; much better to rely on our generous benefit system and remain home instead of getting a job.

Our growth industry is fast food outlets and supermarkets; sport though is king and if only the resources put into sport was put into industry then perhaps once again we could show the world how good we are but it's a downward spiral and who actually cares any longer.

My moaning won't change a thing but at least I can still use my skills for our own benefit as you rightly say saving us a great deal of money; there's little satisfaction in just handing over money; satisfaction is at a more personal level where head and hands have been used to make something useful.

I often say I'm a dinosaur and I'm proud of it; what's taught in universities these days; very little I imagine where physical work with tools is involved. I do marvel at the skills of those who input the data into CNC but it's a different kind of doing things and for mass production it can't be beaten but for a one off prototype I wonder if setting up a CNC machine would be quicker than hands on.

I could ramble on all day but I just despair by the way the UK is heading.

Yesterday I turned a five minute job into a five hour job; our bathroom sink plug hole was gurgling very loudly and progressively getting worse so I finally tackled it. I had browsed YouTube then ordered an anti-syphon trap; I was also aware the gurgling could be caused by a number of things but to be sure before pulling everything apart I started to gather plumbing items. The new anti-syphon trap arrived but it was the wrong trap it being a standard trap; I emailed the seller and credit to him he put his hand up admitting his mistake but with my usual luck he didn't have an anti-syphon trap left but immediately he offered a total refund and generously let me retain the wrong trap with his compliments.

I ordered a tub of linseed oil putty; this arrived in a shattered plastic container. Not to worry I'm used to bad luck so crack on with the job; I visited Screwfix in Brighouse even though we have two Screwfix stores at lot nearer in Huddersfield; I don't shop in Huddersfield because our council detest car owners doing their utmost to make life a misery so off to Brighouse I went in pouring rain; returning home it was now rush hour to cheer me further.

Now the real trouble started; the original trap refused to unscrew under the sink; using excessive force I eventually got the big nut to turn but it sheared off the plug hole outlet; knowing my luck I had the sense to buy a new outlet whilst at Screwfix together with assorted connectors; I found the reason for the gurgling straight away; the pipe was half blocked with filthy slimy gunge and it was this causing the gurgling; not a job I enjoyed but I cleared the pipe best I could then used our Polti steamer to give it a good blast.

Finally having made a mess I could start to add the new parts only to find the the basin plug hole pouring water out; the rubber washers were so thin they weren't sealing even after many attempts; finally I'd had enough of being messed around and visited the workshop for the umpteenth time this time I collected my vintage tin of Boss White; with everything covered in a good layer I finally knocked off at 9:15 last night fed up of plumbing work. Success though no more gurgling and having found the pipework half blocked I decided to use the standard trap sent in error which worked a treat. I emailed the seller of the wrong trap asking if he had already refunded the money; he hadn't so I said please keep it I've used the standard trap you've supplied and by not paying for it I would consider I was robbing you; he was delighted. So just another of my projects giving me an hard time but I don't care; I'm used to it; I always succeed in the end.

Kind regards, Colin.

Plumbing problem_0001.JPG


A five minute job?

Plumbing problem_0002.JPG


Shattered putty container; I'll replace the container. Bring it on I don't care after a lifetime of things like this.

Plumbing problem_0003.JPG


I wrung its neck and it deserved it but in fairness at 54 years old it's served us well.

Plumbing problem_0004.JPG


Who'd have guessed what was under the plug hole?

Wrong trap_0001.JPG


Here's the wrongly supplied trap it should have been anti-syphon but it all came right in the end; on now to the next problem. o_O
 
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Hi,

Back on topic and one for novices to routers. Years ago I bought a corner chisel as a prezzie for a friend and I've just got around to buying one for my own use; Trend corner chisels are excellent quality but for a home workshop much cheaper corner chisels are readily available through eBay.

Kind regards, Colin.

 
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Thanks Colin
We're definitely reading from the same hymnbook.
All I can add is that I am grateful to have enjoyed the what I think were the golden years, the fifties and sixties.
Young people today spend their time differently, but the addiction to screens, especially phones, means that the gap between them and me gets bigger every day.
I have a neighbour with 4 kids - not one has bothered to to utter a word to me, so they don't get their balls back.
The virus has just made matters worse.
I use technology a lot, three PCs, two laptops and the phone. Of course YouTube is useful, but Google never fails to give me the answers.
The internet has changed everything. I went through no internet, early modems and bulletin boards to full-blown megabit connections.
It touches everything we do and even more we don't know about.
I use spreadsheets to cost and record projects.
I use a design program called CorelDraw for laying out flooring, designing sheds etc.
I do as much online as I can, banking, health, shopping for example. It saves me hours every week.
I read the 5-minute job item - I know the feeling well. Jobs just escalate.
Take your basin waste. In theory, you could do it in about half an hour, and without tools, maybe some pump pliers to get the backnut started. 30-minutes would include testing.
First problem, the backnut won't budge. A mechanic said to me once, "well you did it up". Not as simple as that if it involves water.
I guess you tried a release fluid, tightening a bit, or even some heat or a freezer spray.
I'm guessing it was brass and not plated plastic? It does look a bit unusual with the large flange.
As you say, 50-years is fair usage and it owes you nothing.
Basin wastes are virtually designed to leak. Trying to get a seal between a wonky bit of china and what is basically a tank connector is never going to be easy.
My plumber mate has one answer to most things. Lots of Boss White and torque it up to near breaking point. It never leaks and the chances are he won't have to undo it. After all, there's not much pressure in 6" of water.
I like a more subtle approach, correctly seated washers, hand tight and no Boss White.
The user side of the waste is easy. Sometimes I add a thick "O" ring as well. Never use polythene washers as seals.
The real sod and cause of many leaks, is the backnut arrangement. If the basin has an overflow, the backnut will surely leak.
It's because you are having to make a seal on the thread and a parallel one at that.
You can get gadgety kits with patented cone shaped rubber washers that squeeze themselves into the threads.
First thing to try is a wrap of PTFE tape. I always use the gas grade stuff, much thicker and on yellow spools. I don't need to tell you to wind it on in the direction of tightening.
Loctite do a sealing cord, like dental floss soaked in sealant called Loctite 55. Dental floss works as well.
Alternatively, look at your plastic "S" trap. Assuming it's a compression type, where you fit the waste pipe to it, there will be a plastic backing washer and a conical rubber washer. Get a spare set from a plumbers merchant or wherever.
Underneath the basin, fit the rubber washer smallest diameter end pointing into the china. You should have to stretch it on a bit.
Fit the backing washer then nut and hand tighten.
One of these methods will work. Fill the basin and check with a paper towel.
Next time, it might be a 30-minute job and possibly no tools.
Traps do need to be cleaned regularly. Avoid chemicals like caustic soda - only works with grease.
While you are at it, "exercise" any valves around the house, especially the main water stopvalve. Either the one in the house or the utility's pavement valve - take care here!
Nothing like having an important valve that has sat for years unused and is totally seized. WD40 (the genuine item) is safe on most valves including quarter turn ball valves.
With valves like large gate valves, know when to give up and replace it. Recondition the old one at leisure and keep as a spare.
As for anti-siphon traps, they sometimes work, but the complexity brings its own clagging problems.
If it gurgles, let it remind you of holidays by the seaside in those cheap hotels. They gurgle because they aren't running away freely.
My 5-minute job today is to get an external 2-D bulkhead lamp to work. The old one tripped the RCD last week and removing it entirely stopped the tripping. So the fault is in the lamp. No moisture so either the tube or the ballast has gone.
Just had a delivery of a new LED equivalent replacement, no ballast, connect straight to mains.
On that note, I had better crack on.
Stay safe and keep on doing what you are doing - good for mind and body and the bank balance.
 
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Hi,

Thanks piglet for your comprehensive post; much appreciated. I stopped singing from hymn books when I went down the pit aged 15 to the real world; I've nothing against "The Dandy" or "The Beano" though.o_O

How times have changed during the last 70 years; as a kid every neighbour around us were skint but in full time employment many being coal miners as was my late father and grandfather; mothers remained home to look after the kids; yes two parents in those days and no free housing for single girls with a child; mobile phones and computers didn't exist and even a landline phone could only be afforded by the rich. Coal fire and gas plus water but no electricity; £26,000 now is regarded as poverty but if so I don't know what my generation were classed as because food was a luxury.

I have a Coral Draw DVD which was supplied with my very first computer about 22 years ago; what an hassle buying this computer for cash; it was priced at £1,000 but with a special offer reducing it to £900. The salesman was a real pain who insisted on selling insurance which would have cost a further £250 it being a rip off; because I kept saying no he even brought the manager to me at which point I said I either leave here with the computer at £900 or I keep my £900 and buy elsewhere; in those days it had a monster HDD rated at around 8.6GB?

I do use my computer a lot it being the only one I have in use although I do have an old computer as back up both desktop models. I don't use a mobile phone so you won't see one welded to my ear; I use both hands on jobs because I don't smoke either and I don't even touch alcohol unless I'm french polishing. I dislike circuit boards with a passion as I do batteries. I'm definitely a dinosaur who remembers throwing a shovel full of coal into a Lancashire boiler for steam power which was very dependable.

I avoid plumbing jobs if possible; I can do them but not by choice; I'd rather do something more interesting like watching paint dry. I find it strange that I can work on high pressure without leaks but as you say a basin with only 6" deep water in it drives me mad whilst I spend ages sorting leaks out. Years ago I fell for the hype about quarter turn taps and bought such a kitchen mixer tap which was supposed to last forever without dripping; when it did start dripping now a rubber washer costing a few pence suddenly cost the best part of £10 to cure the drip; this didn't happen often until this mixer tap was recycled and a full turn mixer tap installed; some modern things are excellent but others are rubbish.

Our mains water stop valve is under the pavement to the front of our bungalow but we can isolate the water supply in our garage and this works fine; I added a pressure reducing valve years ago when the high water pressure kept causing lots of leaks on our CH boiler; the British Gas engineer told me the water pressure was almost 10 bar and if it wasn't reduced it would invalidate the service agreement; the day after being told this I installed the reducer bought from Screwfix; no problems since but then we've had a new Intergas boiler installed about four years ago and it's simply brilliant with lots less parts to go wrong compared to a conventional boiler.


The "S" basin trap now fitted doesn't have a drain plug at the base which I think is possibly a good thing because the waste has a much smoother flow and should it ever block it's no big problem to release the compression fittings; resealing the fittings though might be a problem; I like to keep things simple just like me.

If I'm to succeed at anything I attempt to do I always find every problem first hence why have an easy life when I can have such an hard life; yesterday just for fun and to play with my Graduate lathe not under any pressure at all and at peace with the world I pulled some turning blanks from the bench and thought I'll turn a lidded box with a finial just to get my hand in again. I turned the box base but wasn't pleased with it; the blank was very poor indeed with lots of voids and splits but I was making shavings so I was happy; this morning I wandered into the workshop hoping to make the lid and finial but gave up; a large hole appeared as I was turning the lid so not wishing to wear this lid I binned it and now I've got a small dish? I had bought a lot of turning blanks through eBay these being two of them. No problem though I enjoyed time on the lathe making a mess and I'm pleased the lid didn't explode as I attempted to turn it.

I've got lots of much better turning blanks in stock for winter and look forward to quality time on the lathe.

Kind regards, Colin.

104_2235.JPG


The blanks were rough before turning; I even tried to repair splits using superglue and auto bodywork filler for the voids;

104_2236.JPG


What I didn't also expect was the filler knocked the edge off the tools very quickly indeed and the filler not being coloured looked terrible but then I was just enjoying playing on the lathe.

104_2237.JPG


Here's the box bottom now turned into a small dish ready for parting off; it's actually better than I expected it to be considering how rough it looked; the black rigs are wire burned this being very easy indeed but highly dangerous for a novice woodturner; the wire has to be fitted with decent handles; if wire is wrapped around fingers then the fingers can be amputated in a blink so don't attempt wire burning by wrapping wire around fingers or in fact wrapping anything even cloth around fingers is highly dangerous. I'll probably bin this little dish because I can do much better.

Lidded box with finial July 15 2018 (1).JPG


One of the first boxes I turned in July 2018. They make nice prezzies and cost little other than enjoyable time.

I've just parted the bowl off and my wife likes it so is keeping it.

Bowl Nov 2020_0001.JPG
 
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