Water coming thru cement in back corner when rains heavily.


Joined
Apr 23, 2020
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
It's in the back corner of my mom's house, the neighbors that have moved in had to add fill dirt (she's only 15' above sea level) plus some other things. Am trying to figure out a fix for this. She's had people try, they put tar down but it didn't help. It's unincorporated so county doesn't maintain the ditches much, am wondering if there's a way to put in a drain bed out to the ditch, ideally with a small pump inside that'd come on when water levels rise? Unfortunately her electrical and phone lines are underground across the back or I'd think of renting a bobcat and just removing dirt, angling it downward towards back yard. Any ideas here?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 13, 2020
Messages
55
Reaction score
4
Country
United Kingdom
It sounds to me like it will be too difficult to resolve the source of the water ingress. It also sound like the moisture is rising through the base of your mums wall. This is rising damp. The only solution is to get the walls injected with silicon to create a damp proof course. Once this relatively cheap work is achieved. Buy a second hand dehumidifier to draw the residual moisture from above the newly injected damp proof course. Job done. No more wet wall
 
Joined
Apr 23, 2020
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
It's actual water coming in, like enough to suck up with a shot vac. There's standing water now around that area when it rains heavily and there's no real drainage to speak of. I'd say it's coming in where the cinder blocks meet the cement floor; from my experience most buildings water will come thru there if it gets high enough, unless it's been treated, I remember reading there's a product they put down usually during construction that seals that area, wouldn't help her situation now as she's let people put tar--which did stop it for awhile. Even where I live once I left my hose spraying some grass seed where the spray hit that bottom portion of my wall and water came thru, same happened to a neighbor when sprinkler blew and hit that area, and another a town away when he had that hurricane a few years back the water built up in her front yard then as the storm passed it blew it all against the wall and water came thru that entire side. Before new neighbors built up their yards with fill dirt, and my mom's yard used to slope down in the back, like we just put fill dirt in the front to raise up there, well over the years she filled in that back yard so now the water has nowhere to go. One thing, before we bought that land, there was a long ditch/trench going all the way down but she filled that in; all over down here in FL you see these trenches to drain the land, and retention ponds when it's done right. She is only 2 blocks from the water so in theory the ditches should drain out there, but over the years the ditches have eroded. I've seen a nice dehumidifier with a pump hose for $300 but she's old and difficult.
 
Joined
Apr 13, 2020
Messages
55
Reaction score
4
Country
United Kingdom
I understand more now, thanks. Have you considered tanking the wall with sand and cement over the block work? If this is done during dry weather that will stick like sh*t to the outside whilst waterproofing it. Then you can dehumidify from the inside. If you can’t afford one, a weekly hire cost is very cheap.
 
Joined
Apr 23, 2020
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
Think that will work better than the tar? She can afford the dehumidifier, just hard explaining things to her; she thinks it'd just release the water right back outside, but can attach a long hose to it so it'd be away from there.
Do you mean like digging down to bottom of foundation then troweling the sand/cement to seal in-between there? I had a friend with a ferro cement sailboat that ran aground with a hole in it; he used what he called pool epoxy and sand and it sealed the hole.
 
Joined
Apr 13, 2020
Messages
55
Reaction score
4
Country
United Kingdom
Sounds like a a good idea. I still would get the wall/s injected with silicone to create the damp proof course before placing sand and cement on the affected external part of the wall. You can find you tube videos which will show you how to do this your self. If you want to go the whole way, there are plastic membranes which can go behind the sand and cement render, however this is expensive. In relation to the dehumidifier, it will have the be situated after the remedial works mentioned above, right next to the internal part of the wall which remains damp, until it’s water tank eventually runs dry after many times of emptying. The door/s to the room will always have to be shit whist you are drying the walls out with this method to avoid the dehumidifier drawing moisture from any where else in the property also. Very best of luck
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 13, 2020
Messages
55
Reaction score
4
Country
United Kingdom
Sorry, I forgot to mention, the tar will always eventually fail on a damp wall. It’s only a temporary fix.
 
Joined
Apr 23, 2020
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
Ok, I have a better understanding now of what to do. I think my friend with the ferro-cement sailboat used something like this and while the boat was aground at the time, it did seal a good sized hole that was underwater afterwards, so am optimistic that it'll stick and stay sealed.
Thanks for the help, it's much appreciated.
 
Joined
Apr 23, 2020
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
Sorry, I forgot to mention, the tar will always eventually fail on a damp wall. It’s only a temporary fix.
[/QUOTE

Do you think this could be done from the inside, say going around the interior where foundation meets wall to seal it that way? She just told me the water has started coming in on the other side as well; if I could slather that epoxy/sand mix to seal where it joins would be easier than doing it outside; or do you even think that spray foam might seal it?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 13, 2020
Messages
55
Reaction score
4
Country
United Kingdom
Yes that could be an option to tank the wall from the inside with sand and cement. I don’t think spray foam would cut it.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top