Safe working on top of polycarbonate conservatory roof


Joined
Sep 5, 2013
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Hi guys, having established that I can probably fit some soffit vents myself in my 2 storey house, my final obstacle is that I have a polycarbonate roofed conservatory that runs the length of one side of my house. If I can get up there (and stay up there) I can reach to put the vents in (just about as I am 6'4). My question is how to get up there and not go through. It isn't possible to go up a ladder from the ground as the angle would be too much.

It is triple layered polycarbonate and some people have said that it is very strong but I don't want to prove them wrong by falling through it!

It is a lean-to style and there are rafter type bars (aluminium perhaps) that run from the eave to ridge. It is probably a 10-12degree angle. I am wondering if there are rubber non-slip type boards I could get or some other tool that would make the trip up there safe?

Once up there I would need to go across the full length of the house so ideally would set something up to work as a full platform. I'd rather do this as cheaply as possible so to not use scaffolding.

I'd be really grateful if anyone has any tips on how to proceed with this! Thanks
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jan 19, 2013
Messages
270
Reaction score
26
Location
Surrey
I just hate that situation. The polycarbonate cannot be stood on, and the glazing bars are very easily damaged. I've not come across any devise of the type you mention. Often scaffold boards are used, but some means has to be devised to prevent them moving, also the roof may need propping from the inside. another way could be to remove the panels one by one.

Please bear in mind that if you are using a hole saw of that size, the power tool will need to be very tightly held with both hands, and if it should jam, you could be thrown by it.

Please don't take any chances, and best of luck with the project.
 
Joined
Sep 5, 2013
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Thanks for your experienced thoughts on this John.

You are right to suggest not taking any chances - this is exactly why I come to forums such as this to save myself some painful lessons :)

I will try to put the drill on a torque limited setting and go lightly to reduce the throw. I'll also ensure I have good footing and secure ladder positioning for the taller bits - otherwise I won't do it at all.

I'm thinking about getting 6 x 10ft scaffold boards (these will span at least 6 glazing bars) and perhaps I could glue some non-slip type foam to one (or both) sides of it to prevent the slipping. I would have 3 deep at one side and then 3deep in the middle section (conservator about 30ft long). I think this would give 650mm platform which seems big enough for stability.

Interesting idea about propping from the inside. What would you use to do this and how would you go about ensuring the props don't fall with any flex from the roof? I've only seen ones designed to hold joists parallel to the floor which I don't think would work with an angled glazing bar.

I was wrong about the roof angle actually it looks like more like 5degrees, so not so steep
 
Joined
Sep 5, 2013
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Something like this perhaps:
shop.pinbax.com/index.asp?selection=detailed&uid=32362&itemtitle=Non%20Slip%20Self%20adhesive%20tape%20rubber%20latex%20surface%201%20inch
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jan 19, 2013
Messages
270
Reaction score
26
Location
Surrey
Sounds OK, scaffold boards normally come in standard length of just under 13 feet. as for the non slip, you'll have to be the judge of that !
Inside you could use normal Acrow type props with another board against the roof (not a one man job) the angle to the board wouldn't matter, with perhaps a few battens screwed to the boards touching the walls to prevent movement. There's no reason why you couldn't simply use lengths of timber for the props though, save messing about hiring or buying Acrows, and they are heavy.
Just be inventive !

I wish you a successful and safe project.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top