Loctite Vs Super Glue?

Discussion in 'General DIY and Home Improvement' started by yadnom1973, Apr 12, 2018.

  1. yadnom1973

    yadnom1973

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    Looking at fixing a threaded stud into a handle and I was going to use Loctite Red but the guy at the shop was going to use Super Glue. I always took Loctite Red as pretty much the last word in bonding threads as long as there was no heat involved, go knows it’s given me enough misery trying to undo them. I don’t really know anything about how super glue would behave?

    So I was wondering what people out there normally turn to for a permanent fix of a stainless steel thread?
     
    yadnom1973, Apr 12, 2018
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  2. yadnom1973

    Selfdoz

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    If you go with sglue, buy a miu like gorilla glue brand, because the imports do not hold up well.
     
    Selfdoz, Apr 27, 2018
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  3. yadnom1973

    Dante Vega

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    For this job i would go with something that was made for the purpose. Your looking for an adhesive to hold a bolt on a stud correct. Loctite has different strengths depending on how much a hold a job requires. The concept of Lotite is to hold a screw, bolt, nut or something with thread in place till you want to take it off. I believe the strengths are rated for different pressure ratings. Meaning you would have to apply a certain amount of pressure torque wise in order for the loctite to loosen. If you are looking for a permanent hold then super glue or gorilla glue may be a better choice. But even then they have different glues for different materials. If you are looking to use on metal make sure the label specifies works on metal or any other material being applied to.
     
    Dante Vega, May 2, 2018
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  4. yadnom1973

    Jons999

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    If it is a metal stud going into metal threads less than 1 1/2” diameter, red loctite would be the way to go. Red loctite usually requires heat to remove. If it was two different materials, such as steel going into plastic you would probably want some sort of epoxy made for those materials. Loctite cures in an anerobic environment, where as super glue needs air and moisture to cure so I’m not sure how well that would work on threads.
     
    Jons999, May 2, 2018
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  5. yadnom1973

    Dante Vega

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    These are some good points but I would still say the difference is between permanent and temporary. For the same point of heat exposure. It was never really specified weather the fixture was indoors or out doors but I can say this if the fixture is exposed to sunlight even though its not that hot outside metal soaks up a pretty good amount of heat as such do other materials.

    I would take the elements into consideration if its going to be exposed to heat or near a heat source such as hot water/steam pipes or vents which have hot air output. If there is any way of the seal being exposed to heat I would go with something more permanent which doesn't lose strength when exposed to heat.
     
    Dante Vega, May 2, 2018
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  6. yadnom1973

    piglet11

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    I would use an epoxy like Araldite or a styrene
    If you have ever come across chemical fixings, these are threaded studs that fix into concrete when you don't want to stress the concrete with expanding bolts. Fischer do the adhesive. This type of fixing is used on climbing walls and handrails etc. and I can vouch for it's effectiveness as I managed to straighten up a double thickness brick wall using chemical fixings.
     
    piglet11, May 2, 2018
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  7. yadnom1973

    Jons999

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    I believe the temp required to soften loctite 272 is around 400F. I think some more info on the application would be helpful as well. If it is not something subject to a lot of twisting or vibration it probably isn’t critical what is used.
     
    Jons999, May 2, 2018
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