Best Way to Repair Broken Sink Drain Pipe?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Drains' started by StrongEagle, Oct 7, 2018.

  1. StrongEagle

    StrongEagle

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    About 20 years ago, we replaced all of the drainpipes in the house... toilets, showers, tubs, utility room, and the kitchen sink. Shortly after we did the replacement we also put in a new driveway. The result is that the new drainpipe for the kitchen sink came out of the exterior wall and into the driveway. See the first pic.

    [​IMG]

    As you can also see from the picture, there is a leak. When a full sink of water is emptied so that there is a strong flow of water in the drain, this leak appears. The pipe is not clogged.

    After 20 years and a couple of seriously major drought periods in Houston, the driveway has shifted enough to break the drainpipe about two inches below the surface of the concrete. Apologies for the poor images... this first image shows the broken pipe (the tip of the red arrow is on the lighter colored broken pipe). It has shifted about the thickness of the pipe wall.

    [​IMG]

    This second pic is shot with a cheap endoscope but does show the shift a little bit better.

    [​IMG]

    I really don't want to break up the concrete to repair this pipe. I know that when the city extended the life of my sewer lines they put a fiberglass/rosin insert in the line and used pressurized hot water to expand and cure the fiberglass lining.

    Obviously, I have neither the equipment nor the skills to do something as radical. Any other way to patch this leak? The only thing that has come to mind is to put a 90 degree L on the end of a tube of acrylic sealant and see if I couldn't run some kind of seam around the leak.

    TIA
     
    StrongEagle, Oct 7, 2018
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  2. StrongEagle

    Retired

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    Hi,

    Could you add a reducer at the top and install a smaller diameter plastic pipe to discharge as low as possible below the break? Reducers come in many styles and types; it would take slightly longer for your sink to empty? You would need to know the size of your original pipe and it's bore diameter to select the largest pipe diameter possible to fit inside the pipe in the concrete.

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=p...eAhULJ8AKHVwVBSAQsAR6BAgGEAE&biw=1920&bih=938

    An SDS drill could be used to drill a pattern of holes right through the concrete creating just large enough hole allowing a patch of concrete to be removed to effect permanent repairs but this is more complicated and a suitable tight fitting sleeve would be needed?

    Below are pictures of how I go about leaks; we suffered water ingress through the wall to foundation mortar joint; I made good the leak then ran a course of engineering bricks fully bedding these in a strong mortar mix along the wall bottom and foundation; then I replaced the old drains and added the channel for flood defence; water cascading down our steep garden soaking under the flags is now diverted to the side of the bungalow by the channel; it was incredibly hard work but these kind of jobs need doing once and doing correctly.

    Just a couple of ideas; good luck.

    Kind regards, Colin.

    Flood defences_001.JPG
    Water ingress fully sorted out; under the bungalow it's now dry.

    Flood defences_002.JPG

    Engineering bricks to the wall/foundation fully bedded in mortar; the old concrete is the bungalow foundation; the new discharge channel has a 4" thick concrete base with a pair of walls made of engineering bricks; this is a lot of unseen work the finished job can be seen above; no problems since I did this work.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018
    Retired, Oct 12, 2018
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  3. StrongEagle

    StrongEagle

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    Colin - many thanks for the ideas. I don't know for sure that I will go with a sleeve. I tried a rolled up sheet of sheet plastic... it didn't work... maybe your idea will.

    In any event, The idea of cutting the drain pipe would offer me an additional way to getting closer to the break and being able to make some sort of adhesive repair. Then I could use a saddle joint to repair.
     
    StrongEagle, Oct 17, 2018
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  4. StrongEagle

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    Hi,

    You're most welcome. If you do cut the pipe please stuff a lump of rag attached to a length of string into the exposed open end to prevent foreign bodies falling in leaving the rag in place until the last minute then pulling it out before making a new connection; I'm sure you'll be aware of the dangers of ending up with a blocked pipe?

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
    Retired, Oct 18, 2018
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