Wired doorbells


L

larkim

Just curious, why do most wired doorbells need a transformer, with the associated hassle of wiring from a mains source to the tranformer and then to the bell, when they could just as easily use a 9V battery in the sounder unit instead?

I presume there's a good reason, just I'm too much of a numpty to work it out for myself.

I know there are some battery only devices, but they are all horrible and don't meet SWMBO's audio requirements nor visual aesthetic requirements. And wiring something up doesn't meet my requirements. (And wireless ones areeither crap, don't work in my house, look ugly or don't make the right sort of ring for SWMBO!).

Matt
 
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D

Dave Plowman (News)

Just curious, why do most wired doorbells need a transformer, with the
associated hassle of wiring from a mains source to the tranformer and
then to the bell, when they could just as easily use a 9V battery in the
sounder unit instead?
You won't get a loud sounder *and* decent battery life from a 9 volt
battery.

Mains bells also give the possibility of an illuminated bell push.

It's really hardly any more work to fit a transformer if using a cabled
system - and it's then forget time for many many years.
 
H

Harry Bloomfield

larkim was thinking very hard :
I know there are some battery only devices, but they are all horrible and
don't meet SWMBO's audio requirements nor visual aesthetic requirements. And
wiring something up doesn't meet my requirements. (And wireless ones are
either crap, don't work in my house, look ugly or don't make the right sort
of ring for SWMBO!).
All maybe true in the distant past, but pay a bit extra for a good
quality modern one and none of that is true. If range is an issue, then
get one of the longer range versions.

The only good reason to have a wired system with a transformer, is if
you must have a light on the push. Run on battery they do not last
long. A wired battery one without a light is otherwise fine, but most
installing one these days choose a wireless option.
 
M

meow2222

Just curious, why do most wired doorbells need a transformer, with the associated hassle of wiring from a mains source to the tranformer and then tothe bell, when they could just as easily use a 9V battery in the sounder unit instead?



I presume there's a good reason, just I'm too much of a numpty to work itout for myself.



I know there are some battery only devices, but they are all horrible anddon't meet SWMBO's audio requirements nor visual aesthetic requirements. And wiring something up doesn't meet my requirements. (And wireless ones are either crap, don't work in my house, look ugly or don't make the right sort of ring for SWMBO!).



Matt
End users would get pretty fed up with a system that failed reguarly and didn't even warn them. You also can't get much power from a PP3, you can froma 6v lantern battery, a much better match to most sounders.


NT
 
L

larkim

larkim was thinking very hard :








All maybe true in the distant past, but pay a bit extra for a good

quality modern one and none of that is true. If range is an issue, then

get one of the longer range versions.
Show me a nice looking, high quality wireless one with a proper "bell" sounder, and I'll agree with you. I've certainly not found what she needs!

This would be ideal, wireless http://doorchimesuk.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=36&products_id=610

But its not. And in our newly decorated hallway, I'm going to struggle making a neat job of getting power to a transformer, and then to the bell / button.

Cheers!

Matt
 
D

djornsk

Just curious, why do most wired doorbells need a transformer, with the associated hassle of wiring from a mains source to the tranformer and then to the bell, when they could just as easily use a 9V battery in the sounder unit instead?

I presume there's a good reason, just I'm too much of a numpty to work it out for myself.

I know there are some battery only devices, but they are all horrible and don't meet SWMBO's audio requirements nor visual aesthetic requirements. And wiring something up doesn't meet my requirements. (And wireless ones are either crap, don't work in my house, look ugly or don't make the right sort of ring for SWMBO!).

Matt
This is slightly off-topic, but something I would consider particularly
if doing serious redecorating would be to install an old fashoned
mechanical bell operated by cable. That if done right and depending on
the property could be a quality enhancement and totally green as it were.

j
 
A

ARW

Dave said:
You won't get a loud sounder *and* decent battery life from a 9 volt
battery.

Mains bells also give the possibility of an illuminated bell push.

It's really hardly any more work to fit a transformer if using a
cabled system - and it's then forget time for many many years.
Unless the customer buys the parts. eg MTS8

http://www.electrika.com/f/0150-wylex-09/index.html#9

part of DIN RAIL MODULAR DEVICES FOR USE IN + UNITS AND FLEXIBLE UNITS.

And what was the advice from Wylex technical sercices department (the
customer had a NH CU)?

The advice was, "it does not fit the CU, use a seperate enclosure next to
the CU".
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

How about the mains wireless devices - the sounder plugs into a socket,
and you can invite TMH round the screw the push to the front door!
Wonder how long before they get smashed by the hoover?
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

The only good reason to have a wired system with a transformer, is if
you must have a light on the push. Run on battery they do not last
long. A wired battery one without a light is otherwise fine, but most
installing one these days choose a wireless option.
There is only one reason to install wireless. Sloth.
 
B

Brian Gaff

I don't think there is any problem with using DC for a bell. I had one for
years that ran off four D cells, but the thing is that most mechanical ones,
if you like the real chime type employ solonoids which simply goone way
when you hit the bell push and bounce back the other when you let go again
and the idiots that lean on the bell push seem to be multiplying and started
to wear out the batteries. I guess modern bells could hav ehe solonoids
operated by a circuit instead to stop this sort of thing from happening. In
the case above though the transformer and its rectified output put paid to
leaking batteries for ever, well untill I fitted a door phone and decided to
use its naff sounding honking as the bell!

Brian

--
Brian Gaff....Note, this account does not accept Bcc: email.
graphics are great, but the blind can't hear them
Email: (e-mail address removed)
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Just curious, why do most wired doorbells need a transformer, with the
associated hassle of wiring from a mains source to the tranformer and then
to the bell, when they could just as easily use a 9V battery in the sounder
unit instead?

I presume there's a good reason, just I'm too much of a numpty to work it
out for myself.

I know there are some battery only devices, but they are all horrible and
don't meet SWMBO's audio requirements nor visual aesthetic requirements.
And wiring something up doesn't meet my requirements. (And wireless ones
are either crap, don't work in my house, look ugly or don't make the right
sort of ring for SWMBO!).

Matt
 
H

Harry Bloomfield

Dave Plowman (News) explained :
There is only one reason to install wireless. Sloth.
I run a wired LAN and a Wireless one. I have LAN sockets in many of the
rooms, but wireless side has the major advantage that I can make use of
it anywhere I happen to be range, which is anywhere in the house and
most of the garden.

A decent wireless door bell has the same advantage, in that I can take
the receiver bell unit anywhere with me. I often spend time in the
garage/ workshop remote from the house and if I'm expecting an arrival,
I can take the bell along with me.

I long ago (before the days of wireless phones) wired up telephone
sockets around the entire house and included one in the garage. Only
one of those sockets is now used, for the wireless phone. If I'm
expecting a call, I carry the phone around with me.

Not a matter of sloth, a much more convenient system.
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

I run a wired LAN and a Wireless one. I have LAN sockets in many of the
rooms, but wireless side has the major advantage that I can make use of
it anywhere I happen to be range, which is anywhere in the house and
most of the garden.
A decent wireless door bell has the same advantage, in that I can take
the receiver bell unit anywhere with me. I often spend time in the
garage/ workshop remote from the house and if I'm expecting an arrival,
I can take the bell along with me.
And what if you're not expecting anyone? Do you still carry it around all
the time like a phone?
I long ago (before the days of wireless phones) wired up telephone
sockets around the entire house and included one in the garage. Only
one of those sockets is now used, for the wireless phone. If I'm
expecting a call, I carry the phone around with me.
Easier to have a few phones to cover the house. Same with doorbells.
Not a matter of sloth, a much more convenient system.
You have a different view of convenience than me.
 
M

meow2222

Show me a nice looking, high quality wireless one with a proper "bell" sounder, and I'll agree with you. I've certainly not found what she needs!



This would be ideal, wireless http://doorchimesuk.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=36&products_id=610



But its not. And in our newly decorated hallway, I'm going to struggle making a neat job of getting power to a transformer, and then to the bell / button.



Cheers!



Matt
Power to the transformer is almost never an issue, just use a 5-8v 1A wallwart. Power from theree on can be run on enamelled copper wire on the surface or slipped into cracks, and remain invisible.


NT
 
O

Owain

... untill I fitted a door phone and decided to
use its naff sounding honking as the bell!
Most of those use about 10 Volt AC and are quite capable of using a
bell or chime instead of the internal buzzer.

If it's a warble-y one then that may not apply.

Owain
 
C

Chris J Dixon

Harry said:
A decent wireless door bell has the same advantage, in that I can take
the receiver bell unit anywhere with me. I often spend time in the
garage/ workshop remote from the house and if I'm expecting an arrival,
I can take the bell along with me.
The sounder for my doorbell plugs into a mains socket, which gets
rid of part of the battery problem. However, because it is not
near the front door, and additionally the sound is produced when
the push is released, callers almost always knock as well.

Somebody recently remarked that it wasn't working, and I
demonstrated their error, commenting to them that I thought the
point was to put it where _I_ could hear it. The indicator light
flashes, but is clearly not trusted.

Chris
 
P

PeterC

You won't get a loud sounder *and* decent battery life from a 9 volt
battery.
We had one of those old Friedland things with the 4.5V battery and it was
plenty loud enough.
Due to old age (the bell) and difficulty in getting batteries, we no use a
wireless thing.
If I could get another 4.5V one I'd use 4 Eneloops in it - almost zero
running cost and should last a couple of years on a charge.
 
L

larkim

larkim formulated on Thursday :





Why do people only think about such things when they've "newly

decorated"????
I thought about it, I just didn't expect the wireless bell which I had lined up to work to be so crap that goes off in the night no matter which channel I configure it up to. The recommendation from here was to look at the more pricey wireless bells (which I have done), but they are all f-ugly and make 1980s style faux-bigben noises as far as I've been able to tell (certainly not the nice ring that SWMBO wants). So I'm back to thinking of wiredones, but the potential power source locations in our house are limited inthe area where I'd need them.

To be honest, I'm happy enough with a knocker, but I'm domestically disagreed with.

Matt
 
P

polygonum

The sounder for my doorbell plugs into a mains socket, which gets
rid of part of the battery problem. However, because it is not
near the front door, and additionally the sound is produced when
the push is released, callers almost always knock as well.

Somebody recently remarked that it wasn't working, and I
demonstrated their error, commenting to them that I thought the
point was to put it where _I_ could hear it. The indicator light
flashes, but is clearly not trusted.

Chris
Good argument.

But surely the next step would be to have a door bell that sends an SMS
- and you can then be alerted on your mobile wheresoever you might be.
Ideally with the ability to make a voice call as well and thereby allow
some dialogue if you really are away. Obviously needs to be a limited
device so no-ones sees them as a way of getting a free mobile...
 
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T

The Medway Handyman

larkim was thinking very hard :

All maybe true in the distant past, but pay a bit extra for a good
quality modern one and none of that is true. If range is an issue, then
get one of the longer range versions.

As the groups leading expert on the installation of wireless doorbells,
I have to agree with Harry :)
 

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