Why is my wrench turning black


E

Eigenvector

I bought this Husky brand chrome vanadium steel crecent wrench and I notice
that the handle on this thing is starting to turn blueish black. To me it
looks like its been subjected to high heat (it has NOT). The only thing I
can think of that might have gotten on the handle would be teflon pipe dope.

Any ideas why this is happening? Despite the fact that it's a piece of crap
made in China, it's actually a really nice wrench.
 
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C

cavedweller

My guess, messed up chrome plating.

If it even is proper chrome plating, with nickel underneath....sounds
like just a "flash"
of something...maybe chromium, maybe not.
 
M

mm

Any ideas why this is happening? Despite the fact that it's a piece of crap
made in China, it's actually a really nice wrench.
I dont see how you can call it a piece of crap if it is a really nice
wrench. It's one or the other or neither, but it can't be both.
 
E

Edwin Pawlowski

Eigenvector said:
I bought this Husky brand chrome vanadium steel crecent wrench and I notice
that the handle on this thing is starting to turn blueish black. To me it
looks like its been subjected to high heat (it has NOT). The only thing I
can think of that might have gotten on the handle would be teflon pipe
dope.

Any ideas why this is happening? Despite the fact that it's a piece of
crap made in China, it's actually a really nice wrench.
Probably oxidation. Not much chromium in the steel to prevent it.

metallurgy) Any of several strong, hard alloy steels containing 0.15-0.25%
vanadium, 0.50-1% chromium, and 0.45-0.55% carbon. Also known as
chrome-vanadium steel.
a.. 8650 is the most common grade in use throughout the U.S. and the Far
East. It does not have the hardness or ductility of Protanium® Steel
a.. Chrome Vanadium is about comparable in quality to 8650. It is used
primarily in Europe.
a.. Chrome Moly is similar to Chrome Vanadium, but is somewhat stronger and
harder. Because it is fairly expensive, manufacturers generally only use it
on their higher grade and higher priced tools like ball head products, and
substitute lower grades for their other tools. Europe and Japan are the
primary users.
 
E

Edwin Pawlowski

Jeff said:
My guess, messed up chrome plating.
Chromium vanadium steel is not plated. It is just the name of a specific
alloy.
 
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E

Eigenvector

Edwin Pawlowski said:
Probably oxidation. Not much chromium in the steel to prevent it.

metallurgy) Any of several strong, hard alloy steels containing 0.15-0.25%
vanadium, 0.50-1% chromium, and 0.45-0.55% carbon. Also known as
chrome-vanadium steel.

a.. 8650 is the most common grade in use throughout the U.S. and the Far
East. It does not have the hardness or ductility of Protanium® Steel
a.. Chrome Vanadium is about comparable in quality to 8650. It is used
primarily in Europe.
a.. Chrome Moly is similar to Chrome Vanadium, but is somewhat stronger
and harder. Because it is fairly expensive, manufacturers generally only
use it on their higher grade and higher priced tools like ball head
products, and substitute lower grades for their other tools. Europe and
Japan are the primary users.

Yeah I can't really think of why it would be turning. Maybe the alloys are
modifying the rusting. Iron Oxide is black too, and there is some blue
underneath it too. Vanadium and Chrome don't turn black and vanadium is
toxic to boot as an oxide. Like I said it looks like it has been heated -
that blue/black/greenish color that copper pipes turn when heated. It's
only where I touch the wrench - the handle and the head - but not the flat
part of the handle where the name is stamped.

Oh well not the end of the world, just wondering really.
 
C

cavedweller

Probably oxidation. Not much chromium in the steel to prevent it.

metallurgy) Any of several strong, hard alloy steels containing 0.15-0.25%
vanadium, 0.50-1% chromium, and 0.45-0.55% carbon. Also known as
chrome-vanadium steel.
You can't define "strength" and "hardness" of a steel based on alloy
content. Alloys are used to enhance hardenability. Physical
properties are developed through appropriate heat treatment where
these alloys have an effect. Ultimate properties are a function of
carbon content.

The noted levels of alloy have no significant effect on corrosion
properties.
a.. 8650 is the most common grade in use throughout the U.S. and the Far
East. It does not have the hardness or ductility of Protanium® Steel
In a hardenable grade, as hardness increases, ductility decreases,
just like a pretty good wrench can't be a piece of crap. :)
 
E

Edwin Pawlowski

You can't define "strength" and "hardness" of a steel based on alloy
content. Alloys are used to enhance hardenability. Physical
properties are developed through appropriate heat treatment where
these alloys have an effect. Ultimate properties are a function of
carbon content.
The noted levels of alloy have no significant effect on corrosion
properties.
OK but we did not talk about or question strength; this was a definition
copied. . So, your answer to the original question is . . . . . . ?
 
C

cavedweller

Chromium vanadium steel is not plated. It is just the name of a specific
alloy.
There's no reason why it couldn't be plated (although it sounds like
the OPs wrench isn't).

Chromium Vanadium steel isn't a specific alloy...it's part of the AISI
6100 series. Indicate the carbon content, and it's a specific alloy.
 
C

cavedweller

.




OK but we did not talk about or question strength; this was a definition
copied. . So, your answer to the original question is . . . . . . ?
I wasn't addressing the original question. I was correcting your post
which dealt with those things.

I suspect the OP has an unplated or black-oxide coated wrench that is
smutting as a result of the effects of his sweat on the handle.
 
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E

Edwin Pawlowski

cavedweller said:
I suspect the OP has an unplated or black-oxide coated wrench that is
smutting as a result of the effects of his sweat on the handle.
Would that be oxidation?
 
E

Eigenvector

cavedweller said:
I wasn't addressing the original question. I was correcting your post
which dealt with those things.

I suspect the OP has an unplated or black-oxide coated wrench that is
smutting as a result of the effects of his sweat on the handle.
I don't believe you're correct here. But I'm really not interested in
getting into it with you because I suspect it wouldn't prove fruitful for
either.

I'm sorry I asked the question.
 
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C

cavedweller

I don't believe you're correct here. But I'm really not interested in
getting into it with you because I suspect it wouldn't prove fruitful for
either.

I'm sorry I asked the question.
I don't think there's a reason for YOU to be miffed. You didn't
indicate in your original post what type of coating your wrench had,
if any. Others, including me, spoke of plating.

High priced wrenches can have bright chromium finishes underlain by
one or even two layers of nickel. Cheaper tools my have just a
"flash" amount of chromium. Still cheaper may have zinc. Others may
have nothing.

My responses were directed at the metallurgical information provided
by Edwin that, while true to an extent, contained some misinformation.

It isn't a matter of "getting into it with anyone". It IS true that
bare steel, or steel that is poorly protected, can discolor or smut
from exposure to moisture, especially sweat.
 

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