When a gallon is not a gallon


G

greg2468

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).
 
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J

JoeSpareBedroom

greg2468 said:
I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).

Everything has to be shipped, and freight rates have gone through the roof
due to the cost of oil, whose price is determined via a system best
described as off-track betting. Manufacturers have a choice to make. They
can raise their prices, or they can shrink their products. Customers vary as
far as which they'd prefer to see happen.

Why the coverage rate remains the same is beyond me. There's a toll free
number on the label. You should call that number and let us know what you
find out.
 
P

Percival P. Cassidy

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).

Sherwin-Williams said that some of their paints are a fraction (can't
remember how much) under a gallon to leave room for the tints. And I
just checked the Pittsburgh paints we bought last week: 3 7/8 quarts,
not the full gallon; I hadn't noticed before. We're in the Midwest.

How many brands of ice cream still have full half-gallon packs? Most are
56oz. instead of 64oz.

-=-
Perce
 
J

JoeSpareBedroom

"Blattus Slafaly £ ¥ 0/00 :)" said:
And a pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14 and now to
13.5 ounces. A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces even
though there was plenty of room in the tub for another ounce.
I think it's called 'bend over a little more while I shove it in a little
farther.'

I think your message is called "I've never run a business, so I don't have a
clue."
 
G

greg2468

Perhaps if you think about it for another hour or two, you'll figure it out.

Then again, maybe you won't.

Hint: coverage is quoted in square feet per *gallon*. Not square feet per
*can*.
Sorry, I must have had my weekly moment of stupidity.
 
J

JoeSpareBedroom

Doug Miller said:
Perhaps if you think about it for another hour or two, you'll figure it
out.

Then again, maybe you won't.

Hint: coverage is quoted in square feet per *gallon*. Not square feet per
*can*.

Good point.
 
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D

DerbyDad03

And a pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14 and now to
13.5 ounces. A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces even
though there was plenty of room in the tub for another ounce.
I think it's called 'bend over a little more while I shove it in a
little farther.'
re: A pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14...

No, it didn't.

re: A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces

No, it wasn't.

A pound is 16 oz. Always was, probably always will be.
 
E

Edwin Pawlowski

Lesson: Stay away from big box stores.

My pre-mixed Ben Moore paint is still a full gallon The tintable base
though, is 126 ounces so they have room to add the tint.
 
J

JoeSpareBedroom

"Blattus Slafaly £ ¥ 0/00 :)" said:
The perception will always be but the contents may vary.

Umm.....NO. These are definitions carved in stone. A pound is 16 ounces.
Period. End of discussion.
 
F

franz fripplfrappl

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains the
same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know if
this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).
Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory and
that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers that we
forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.

Next time I paint a wall, I'm going to paint only 80% of it and charge
the full amount. Same effect. I'll just have to convince customer that
the 20% unpainted looks great and is part of the decor.
 
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J

Jim Elbrecht

On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 17:51:25 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

-snip--
A pound is 16 oz. Always was, probably always will be.
No it isn't. a pound of gold is only 12 ounces.

Jim
 
J

JoeSpareBedroom

franz fripplfrappl said:
Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory and
that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers that we
forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.


Another bullshit answer from someone who thinks products reach the stores by
growing wings and flying there for free.
 
F

franz fripplfrappl

Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory
and that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers that
we forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.

Next time I paint a wall, I'm going to paint only 80% of it and charge
the full amount. Same effect. I'll just have to convince customer that
the 20% unpainted looks great and is part of the decor.
I dont' think so. Sorry.
 
F

franz fripplfrappl

Another bullshit answer from someone who thinks products reach the
stores by growing wings and flying there for free.
It's more than transportation costs. If a supplier were to raise prices
20%, the consumer may not buy the product but go to a competitor. Keep
the packing the same in looks but smaller in size and keep prices close
to what they are, the consumer will grab the package without thinking of
increased cost. The vendor wins. The consumer thinks he/she is getting
the same goods at the same price.

Now that fuel costs are rising, we'll see more price increases, but the
smaller packages have little to do with it..

It's a marketing and a way to increase profits.
 
J

JoeSpareBedroom

franz fripplfrappl said:
It's more than transportation costs. If a supplier were to raise prices
20%, the consumer may not buy the product but go to a competitor. Keep
the packing the same in looks but smaller in size and keep prices close
to what they are, the consumer will grab the package without thinking of
increased cost. The vendor wins. The consumer thinks he/she is getting
the same goods at the same price.

Now that fuel costs are rising, we'll see more price increases, but the
smaller packages have little to do with it..

Now that they're rising? I deal with trucking groceries all day long.
Freight costs began rising 4 years ago. I'm surprised that price increases
have lagged so far behind. It had to happen eventually.

It's a marketing and a way to increase profits.
The OP describes it as an attempt to fool people. That's bullshit. What kind
of work do you do? Do you expect to get salary increases from time to time?

This reminds me of a long debate in a cooking newsgroup, in which whiners
were complaining that Breyers had shrunk their 64 oz ice cream package. This
was portrayed as evil. Some of the idiots seemed to expect Breyer's to send
a post card to every household in America, informing them of the change.
 
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F

franz fripplfrappl

Now that they're rising? I deal with trucking groceries all day long.
Freight costs began rising 4 years ago. I'm surprised that price
increases have lagged so far behind. It had to happen eventually.




The OP describes it as an attempt to fool people. That's bullshit. What
kind of work do you do? Do you expect to get salary increases from time
to time?

This reminds me of a long debate in a cooking newsgroup, in which
whiners were complaining that Breyers had shrunk their 64 oz ice cream
package. This was portrayed as evil. Some of the idiots seemed to expect
Breyer's to send a post card to every household in America, informing
them of the change.


advertising and packaging
 
D

DerbyDad03

Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime.  A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces.  5# of sugar is 4#.  Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory and
that inflation is in check.  We're so used to buying containers that we
forget to read what's actually in them.  By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.

Next time I paint a wall, I'm going to paint only 80% of it and charge
the full amount.  Same effect.  I'll just have to convince customer that
the 20% unpainted looks great and is part of the decor.
re: A pound of coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#.

I'm sure you meant to say "Some containers of coffee are 9 ounces" and
"Some bags of sugar are 4#"

When I walk into a coffee shop and ask for a pound of coffee, I get 16
oz. When I go to the public market and ask for a pound of sugar, I get
16 oz.

Are some stores selling 9 oz of coffee for the same price as they used
charge for a pound? Sure - but they don't call it a pound. What's the
big deal? Prices have gone up. Anybody that's "fooled" by the
marketing ploy of downsizing the containers and keeping the price the
same is just that - a fool. If you need a pound of something, buy a
pound of it.
 
J

JoeSpareBedroom

franz fripplfrappl said:
advertising and packaging

Packaging: Already done. The new size is printed on the labels.

Advertising: You think manufacturers should pay for ads informing customers
of shrinking sizes?

By the way, does paint depend on any petroleum-based raw materials?
 
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J

JoeSpareBedroom

Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory and
that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers that we
forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.

Next time I paint a wall, I'm going to paint only 80% of it and charge
the full amount. Same effect. I'll just have to convince customer that
the 20% unpainted looks great and is part of the decor.
re: A pound of coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#.

I'm sure you meant to say "Some containers of coffee are 9 ounces" and
"Some bags of sugar are 4#"

When I walk into a coffee shop and ask for a pound of coffee, I get 16
oz. When I go to the public market and ask for a pound of sugar, I get
16 oz.

Are some stores selling 9 oz of coffee for the same price as they used
charge for a pound? Sure - but they don't call it a pound. What's the
big deal? Prices have gone up. Anybody that's "fooled" by the
marketing ploy of downsizing the containers and keeping the price the
same is just that - a fool. If you need a pound of something, buy a
pound of it.

===================


These complaints come from people who think they should get regular salary
increases, but nobody else should.
 

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