Washing Machine - Does This Sound Right? (Long)


N

Nexus7

But now, at some points in a "normal" cycle the machine's motor stops,
everything is quiet as a mouse, and after about what seems like one
"advance" of the timer knob (about 30 seconds) the motor starts and the
cycle proceeds again.
I never noticed that "stopping" on our old Whirlpool, and this machine
isn't supposed to have any "soak" cycles. I can't think of why it would
be a designed in feature, unless maybe to make sure everything has
Don't know about this model, however dishwashers pause like this,
although I don't know if it is for as long as 30 s. I think it is to
let the water drip down before draining. My washing machine (front-
loader) pauses between steps (such as rinse->spin) or even at times
while filling with water. I think it is because things don't happen
instantaneously. So it allows the water to soak the clothes so it can
figure out how much more to add.

The dishwasher has a mechanical timer, and the WM's is a computer. So
yours could be a combination of having a mechanical timer and
necessary process delays.
 
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J

Jeff Wisnia

I recently purchased a Kenmore Model YPE111 top loading washing machine
to replace a twenty year old Whirlpool washer which had given us
faithful service for far longer than I could believe.

Shortly after we started using our new machine we noticed that sometimes
when the timer advanced to a point where a drain/spin cycle should start
the machine "stalled". The motor did not run and an electrical hum could
be heard for about a minute, until it stopped with a "click" which
sounded to me like a thermal circuit breaker popping. This happened even
with a VERY light load of clothes in the tub.

The machine would remain completely "dead" for about 15 minutes, and if
the timer knob hadn't been moved by hand the hum would start again (When
the thermal breaker reset?).

If we nudged the timer knob ahead a tiny bit during that humming sound,
the drain/spin cycle would start and the remainder of the wash would
complete OK.

A Sears tech came out and blamed it on the timer. He replaced the timer
a few days ago and that "stall" with a "hum and click" hasn't happened
since.

But now, at some points in a "normal" cycle the machine's motor stops,
everything is quiet as a mouse, and after about what seems like one
"advance" of the timer knob (about 30 seconds) the motor starts and the
cycle proceeds again.

I asked the tech who replaced the timer and he stated it was "normal",
he'd observed it before, but he didn't know "why" it happened.

I never noticed that "stopping" on our old Whirlpool, and this machine
isn't supposed to have any "soak" cycles. I can't think of why it would
be a designed in feature, unless maybe to make sure everything has
stopped moving before they reverse the motor, so there's no shock like
you'll get from shifting a car into reverse while it's still rolling
forward. <G>.

Is the tech correct about those "pauses" being normal or are they maybe
something I should be concerned about while the machine is still in
warranty?

Jeff
 
M

mm

I think it is similar to the situation of a great high jumper or pole
vaulter. They get out there and they breathe a few times, and they
wait until they feel the moment is right to start their run to the
bar. Same with the machine. It has to know, to feel, to believe that
it can make it through the next cycle before it is ready to start.
 
Joined
May 10, 2017
Messages
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1
Location
California
I recently purchased a Kenmore Model YPE111 top loading washing machine
to replace a twenty year old Whirlpool washer which had given us
faithful service for far longer than I could believe.

Shortly after we started using our new machine we noticed that sometimes
when the timer advanced to a point where a drain/spin cycle should start
the machine "stalled". The motor did not run and an electrical hum could
be heard for about a minute, until it stopped with a "click" which
sounded to me like a thermal circuit breaker popping. This happened even
with a VERY light load of clothes in the tub.

The machine would remain completely "dead" for about 15 minutes, and if
the timer knob hadn't been moved by hand the hum would start again (When
the thermal breaker reset?).

If we nudged the timer knob ahead a tiny bit during that humming sound,
the drain/spin cycle would start and the remainder of the wash would
complete OK.

A Sears tech came out and blamed it on the timer. He replaced the timer
a few days ago and that "stall" with a "hum and click" hasn't happened
since.

But now, at some points in a "normal" cycle the machine's motor stops,
everything is quiet as a mouse, and after about what seems like one
"advance" of the timer knob (about 30 seconds) the motor starts and the
cycle proceeds again.

I asked the tech who replaced the timer and he stated it was "normal",
he'd observed it before, but he didn't know "why" it happened.

I never noticed that "stopping" on our old Whirlpool, and this machine
isn't supposed to have any "soak" cycles. I can't think of why it would
be a designed in feature, unless maybe to make sure everything has
stopped moving before they reverse the motor, so there's no shock like
you'll get from shifting a car into reverse while it's still rolling
forward. <G>.

Is the tech correct about those "pauses" being normal or are they maybe
something I should be concerned about while the machine is still in
warranty?

Jeff

--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
The speed of light is 1.98*10^14 fathoms per fortnight.
 
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Joined
May 10, 2017
Messages
9
Reaction score
1
Location
California
I don't know about your washer, but I would like to take this opportunity to maybe get attention from Sears on how to make a better washer. I think a better washer would allow a setting from minutes to hours that the fabric softener remains in the rinse water with the clothes. I notice when I turn my washer off (or pause it - depending on which washer) overnight to allow the fabric softener to "fix" to the clothes, the clothes come out smelling better. Also Sears (and we love our two Sears' high tech washers that we bought 7 years apart), while I'm at it, such a setting as I have described, might allow the clothes to be ready to hang at a pre-planned time - like when I get back from the store, or when the kids get home from school.
 

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