Washing lightbulbs


M

markflint

With the old incandescent bulbs, washing lightbulbs was pretty simple.
Just remove them from the fixture, then dip them in the sink and wash
them. Wipe them dry with a dish towel, and replace them.

These new CF bulbs are different. Dipping them in water results in
their base filling up with water. This is where their electronics are
located, so once they are dipped in water, they are ruined, or at least
require weeks or more to completely dry internally. On top of this,
their swirlly glass top is much harder to clean. So far, it appears
that the only way to clean them is to use Q-tips and spend a half hour
to clean each bulb. This is time consuming and very annoying.

We wash our bulbs about twice a year. What used to take two or three
hours, now takes two or three days. We're not impressed with these new
bulbs. At least they could seal them so that water can not get inside
when they are washed.

Has anyone found a better way to clean these CF bulbs?
 
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D

Dan Espen

With the old incandescent bulbs, washing lightbulbs was pretty simple.
Just remove them from the fixture, then dip them in the sink and wash
them. Wipe them dry with a dish towel, and replace them.

These new CF bulbs are different. Dipping them in water results in
their base filling up with water. This is where their electronics are
located, so once they are dipped in water, they are ruined, or at least
require weeks or more to completely dry internally. On top of this,
their swirlly glass top is much harder to clean. So far, it appears
that the only way to clean them is to use Q-tips and spend a half hour
to clean each bulb. This is time consuming and very annoying.

We wash our bulbs about twice a year. What used to take two or three
hours, now takes two or three days. We're not impressed with these new
bulbs. At least they could seal them so that water can not get inside
when they are washed.

Has anyone found a better way to clean these CF bulbs?
You're kidding right?

You're not supposed to eat off your light bulbs, screw them in, then
leave them alone.
 
F

Frank

You're kidding right?

You're not supposed to eat off your light bulbs, screw them in, then
leave them alone.
Physicians have often had to remove light bulbs from places you can
guess at. Maybe he had intentions other than using as a light bulb.
 
D

DerbyDad03

With the old incandescent bulbs, washing lightbulbs was pretty simple.
Just remove them from the fixture, then dip them in the sink and wash
them.  Wipe them dry with a dish towel, and replace them.

These new CF bulbs are different.  Dipping them in water results in
their base filling up with water.  This is where their electronics are
located, so once they are dipped in water, they are ruined, or at least
require weeks or more to completely dry internally.  On top of this,
their swirlly glass top is much harder to clean.  So far, it appears
that the only way to clean them is to use Q-tips and spend a half hour
to clean each bulb.   This is time consuming and very annoying.

We wash our bulbs about twice a year.  What used to take two or three
hours, now takes two or three days.  We're not impressed with these new
bulbs.  At least they could seal them so that water can not get inside
when they are washed.

Has anyone found a better way to clean these CF bulbs?
You don't have to clean CF bulbs. Don't you know what CF stands for?

Clean Forever

Where did you think the energy savings came from?
 
M

Moe DeLoughan

With the old incandescent bulbs, washing lightbulbs was pretty simple.
Just remove them from the fixture, then dip them in the sink and wash
them. Wipe them dry with a dish towel, and replace them.

These new CF bulbs are different. Dipping them in water results in
their base filling up with water. This is where their electronics are
located, so once they are dipped in water, they are ruined, or at least
require weeks or more to completely dry internally. On top of this,
their swirlly glass top is much harder to clean. So far, it appears
that the only way to clean them is to use Q-tips and spend a half hour
to clean each bulb. This is time consuming and very annoying.

We wash our bulbs about twice a year. What used to take two or three
hours, now takes two or three days. We're not impressed with these new
bulbs. At least they could seal them so that water can not get inside
when they are washed.

Has anyone found a better way to clean these CF bulbs?
Try running them through a full wash and dry cycle in the dishwasher.
That should return them to factory-new condition.

Don't forget the Jet-Dri!
 
T

The Daring Dufas

With the old incandescent bulbs, washing lightbulbs was pretty simple.
Just remove them from the fixture, then dip them in the sink and wash
them. Wipe them dry with a dish towel, and replace them.

These new CF bulbs are different. Dipping them in water results in
their base filling up with water. This is where their electronics are
located, so once they are dipped in water, they are ruined, or at least
require weeks or more to completely dry internally. On top of this,
their swirlly glass top is much harder to clean. So far, it appears
that the only way to clean them is to use Q-tips and spend a half hour
to clean each bulb. This is time consuming and very annoying.

We wash our bulbs about twice a year. What used to take two or three
hours, now takes two or three days. We're not impressed with these new
bulbs. At least they could seal them so that water can not get inside
when they are washed.

Has anyone found a better way to clean these CF bulbs?
I use a feather duster or equivalent and canned air does a good job too. ^_^

TDD
 
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P

Peter

With the old incandescent bulbs, washing lightbulbs was pretty simple.
Just remove them from the fixture, then dip them in the sink and wash
them. Wipe them dry with a dish towel, and replace them.

These new CF bulbs are different. Dipping them in water results in
their base filling up with water. This is where their electronics are
located, so once they are dipped in water, they are ruined, or at least
require weeks or more to completely dry internally. On top of this,
their swirlly glass top is much harder to clean. So far, it appears
that the only way to clean them is to use Q-tips and spend a half hour
to clean each bulb. This is time consuming and very annoying.

We wash our bulbs about twice a year. What used to take two or three
hours, now takes two or three days. We're not impressed with these new
bulbs. At least they could seal them so that water can not get inside
when they are washed.

Has anyone found a better way to clean these CF bulbs?
Enter the search term "massaging footbath" into your favorite search
engine. For about $30 you can get 1 new. You may even find a used one
at a Goodwill or Salvation Army store. If you are working, the $30
should be worth it to save 3 days of effort. If you're retired, or
chronically unemployed, just pump up your favorite music and enjoy the
cleaning project while you listen.

If you are careful not to immerse the first inch or so of the CFL lamp
where it emerges from the base, this foot bath device might do the job.
You'd have to experiment to find the most effective cleaning agent to
put in the water but I'd start with a dish washing liquid that cuts
grease, such as Dawn or Palmolive. If it doesn't do the job, at least
you can treat yourself to some relaxing foot baths.

You probably won't find too many people who feel the need to use more
than a feather duster or a quick blow of air from your mouth (if
anything at all) on their CFLs so you're probably on your own here.
 
D

DerbyDad03

Get help for your ADD.

There may even be a 12-step program available in your town.

Question: Do you dust INSIDE the books on your shelves?- Hide quoted text-

- Show quoted text -
If they do, they should wear a dust jacket.
 
D

Douglas C. Neidermeyer

With the old incandescent bulbs, washing lightbulbs was pretty simple.
Just remove them from the fixture, then dip them in the sink and wash
them. Wipe them dry with a dish towel, and replace them.

These new CF bulbs are different. Dipping them in water results in
their base filling up with water. This is where their electronics are
located, so once they are dipped in water, they are ruined, or at least
require weeks or more to completely dry internally. On top of this,
their swirlly glass top is much harder to clean. So far, it appears
that the only way to clean them is to use Q-tips and spend a half hour
to clean each bulb. This is time consuming and very annoying.

We wash our bulbs about twice a year. What used to take two or three
hours, now takes two or three days. We're not impressed with these new
bulbs. At least they could seal them so that water can not get inside
when they are washed.

Has anyone found a better way to clean these CF bulbs?
My butler takes care of it.
 
K

krw

You're kidding right?

You're not supposed to eat off your light bulbs, screw them in, then
leave them alone.
You leave dust pile up everywhere for years? What a pig.
 
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R

Red Green

(e-mail address removed) wrote in 4ax.com:
With the old incandescent bulbs, washing lightbulbs was pretty simple.
Just remove them from the fixture, then dip them in the sink and wash
them. Wipe them dry with a dish towel, and replace them.

These new CF bulbs are different. Dipping them in water results in
their base filling up with water. This is where their electronics are
located, so once they are dipped in water, they are ruined, or at least
require weeks or more to completely dry internally. On top of this,
their swirlly glass top is much harder to clean. So far, it appears
that the only way to clean them is to use Q-tips and spend a half hour
to clean each bulb. This is time consuming and very annoying.

We wash our bulbs about twice a year. What used to take two or three
hours, now takes two or three days. We're not impressed with these new
bulbs. At least they could seal them so that water can not get inside
when they are washed.

Has anyone found a better way to clean these CF bulbs?
You need to pull a permit to clean CFL's you know.
 
K

krw

(e-mail address removed) wrote in 4ax.com:


You need to pull a permit to clean CFL's you know.
Nah, I've already got a concealed firearms license.
 
T

Tomsic

Yes.

Washing CFLs periodically is a good idea especially if the CFL is in a dusty
or dirty environment such as a wood shop, barn or in an open fixture
outside. Dirt can easily drop the light output of a spiral CFL by 20-30
percent.

Here's how to clean the CFL without damaging the elecronics.
- Take the CFL out of the socket and hold it base up.
- Spray the spiral glass part with a spray cleaner (Windex works well).
Let the cleaner work for a few seconds disolving the dirt.
- Still holding the CFL base up, rinse the spiral glass part in clean water
taking care that the water doesn't get into the plastic base.
- Gently dry the spiral glass with a soft cloth or paper towel. Wipe off
the plastic base and socket at the same time.
- Lay the CFL down in a warm, dry area so the surfaces of the spiral that
can't be reached with the drying cloth can air dry for a half hour or so.
- Reinstall the CFL in the socket.

Tomsic
 
C

clare

You're kidding right?

You're not supposed to eat off your light bulbs, screw them in, then
leave them alone.
Dust accumulation reduces output - sometimes significantly.
 
D

Dan Espen

Dust accumulation reduces output - sometimes significantly.
So, you wash all the bulbs in your house twice a year?

Here in New Jersey, we don't get that kind of dust accumulation.
Not in one year, not even in five. I've got some bulbs in my attic
fixtures that have been there over 35 years.

Just checked, a little dusty, but bright enough that I think I'll wait
until they burn out.
 
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P

PeterD

You have to run the brand new bulbs thru a dishwasher cycle before the
first use. If you don't then your attempts to wash them later, will fail.
 
H

hr(bob) hofmann

You have to run the brand new bulbs thru a dishwasher cycle before the
first use.  If you don't then your attempts to wash them later, will fail.
Don't say that, some folks may believe you. The Darwin principle will
take care of them.
 
A

anonymous

PeterD said:
You have to run the brand new bulbs thru a dishwasher cycle before the
first use. If you don't then your attempts to wash them later, will fail.

I coat them with WD-40 and the dust slides right off.
 
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K

krw

So, you wash all the bulbs in your house twice a year?
Usually once, when I clean the fans.
Here in New Jersey, we don't get that kind of dust accumulation.
Not in one year, not even in five. I've got some bulbs in my attic
fixtures that have been there over 35 years.
I'm really not concerned if the attic fixtures get a little dusty.
Just checked, a little dusty, but bright enough that I think I'll wait
until they burn out.
Some people don't clean anything. <shrug>
 

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