Transporting 20 gallons of gas in your trunk and storing in your back yard in the open air question


B

Bill Murphy

I have a typical back yard, open mostly to the sun, where I store five
5-gallon jerry jugs of gasoline for my bikes and equipment and off-road
vehicles.

I don't see that it's all that much of a danger, considering we keep two
cars in the garage with twice that much gasoline essentially inside the
house - while this is outside along the fence.

But, my neighbor noticed the four jugs recently and asked about them. I
said I never knew gas to spontaneously explode and he said the sun could
cause it to happen. He also said it's illegal to transport more than a
single five-gallon can in your trunk (is that true?).

Is it all that dangerous to keep 20 gallons of gas in the back yard?
Is it illegal to trasnsport more than 5 gallons (California) in a car?
 
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F

Frank

I have a typical back yard, open mostly to the sun, where I store five
5-gallon jerry jugs of gasoline for my bikes and equipment and off-road
vehicles.

I don't see that it's all that much of a danger, considering we keep two
cars in the garage with twice that much gasoline essentially inside the
house - while this is outside along the fence.

But, my neighbor noticed the four jugs recently and asked about them. I
said I never knew gas to spontaneously explode and he said the sun could
cause it to happen. He also said it's illegal to transport more than a
single five-gallon can in your trunk (is that true?).

Is it all that dangerous to keep 20 gallons of gas in the back yard?
Is it illegal to trasnsport more than 5 gallons (California) in a car?

It's a local thing:

http://cbs4.com/hurricanepreps/gasoline.consumer.generators.2.394472.html
 
W

willy

My concern is with all the fumes. It won't explode from the sun, but
it would be better out of the sun. Less fumes and less volitable.
 
W

willy

Storing gasoline and other highly flammable liquids at home is also
dangerous if not done properly. The best way to store gasoline is in a
well ventilated area separate from the house. The location should have
no electrical equipment, open flames or other sources of ignition
present. In addition, the location should be protected from the heat
of the summer sun to keep evaporation to a minimum.

http://nasdonline.org/document/919/d000760/storing-gasoline-and-other-flammables.html
 
J

JoeSpareBedroom

willy said:
My concern is with all the fumes. It won't explode from the sun, but
it would be better out of the sun. Less fumes and less volitable.

Less expansion & contraction of the containers if out of the sun. I've seen
some plastic jugs which looked like they'd been squeezed by giant hands when
the temp went down.
 
T

Tony Hwang

Bill said:
I have a typical back yard, open mostly to the sun, where I store five
5-gallon jerry jugs of gasoline for my bikes and equipment and off-road
vehicles.

I don't see that it's all that much of a danger, considering we keep two
cars in the garage with twice that much gasoline essentially inside the
house - while this is outside along the fence.

But, my neighbor noticed the four jugs recently and asked about them. I
said I never knew gas to spontaneously explode and he said the sun could
cause it to happen. He also said it's illegal to transport more than a
single five-gallon can in your trunk (is that true?).

Is it all that dangerous to keep 20 gallons of gas in the back yard?
Is it illegal to trasnsport more than 5 gallons (California) in a car?
Hi,
First are you using legal explosion proof container to increase safety
margin? Do you smell gas when your car is parked in the garage? Better
be safe than sorry applies here.
 
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B

Bill Murphy

First are you using legal explosion proof container to increase safety
margin? Do you smell gas when your car is parked in the garage?
To answer your question, I never smell fumes. I'm using those CARB EPA
Blitz gasoline prisons. The gas has been tested to not lose an ounce (they
test loss by weight) even after a year in the sun.

The article referenced says it's safe to store small amounts of gasoline in
the garage or other well ventilated shelter.

It doesn't say anything about transport.

Any ideas what the laws are on transport?
 
T

Tony Hwang

Bill said:
To answer your question, I never smell fumes. I'm using those CARB EPA
Blitz gasoline prisons. The gas has been tested to not lose an ounce (they
test loss by weight) even after a year in the sun.

The article referenced says it's safe to store small amounts of gasoline in
the garage or other well ventilated shelter.

It doesn't say anything about transport.

Any ideas what the laws are on transport?
Hi,
I often use surplus army jerry can filled with gas, propane tak say
going camping. I never keep them in a space like confined trunk. If
you have to keep them in the trunk while in transit, I'd keep the lid
open ajar for venting in case. Worst thing happened to me was overfilled
propane tank started hising releasing gas.
 
J

jameswaters

I have a typical back yard, open mostly to the sun, where I store five
5-gallon jerry jugs of gasoline for my bikes and equipment and off-road
vehicles.

I don't see that it's all that much of a danger, considering we keep two
cars in the garage with twice that much gasoline essentially inside the
house - while this is outside along the fence.

But, my neighbor noticed the four jugs recently and asked about them. I
said I never knew gas to spontaneously explode and he said the sun could
cause it to happen. He also said it's illegal to transport more than a
single five-gallon can in your trunk (is that true?).
I do not think it will explode without someone lighting it, but in the
sun gas tanks expend and contract and that can eventually damage the
containers.

Since this is California, the state which has more laws than the whole
rest of the country combined, it might be illegal to haul more than
one 5 gal. can in your trunk. Call your D.O.T and ask, then tell us
all. Heck, I often haul 3 five gal cans for my tractor in the back
of my pickup.

You could get a 55gal drum with a hand pump and put all the gas in
that can. That's an approved method on most farms, but who knows in
Calif. Plus, if you're in a city, that means more laws. Calif is a
nice state, but the laws are rediculous.
 
J

jameswaters

And if you DO have a spark and a gas fire/explosion either in your car, your
yard, or in your garage, it's going to be nasty, AND MOST IMPORTANTLY, IT
Yea, take an example from BP. After all, they are experts at blowing
up gas and oil.
 
H

hallerb

Local grocery store has advantage card program, every month or two i
earn a free tank of gas up to 30 gallons.

I ALWAYS get 30 gallons my van holds near 20 but i dont like to run it
low, gas pump in tank, the gasoline cools the pump. so i try to never
need more than 17 galllons.

which leaves 15 gallons or less to bring home.

i buy gas at nearby station and drive directly home. gasoline goes in
my shed it has power but its well vantilated.and in a fenced in yard.

i have stored over 30 gallons in those 5 gallon plastic cans.

you could use one of those tiny yard storage buildings or a garbage
can over a couple of 5 gallon cans but a weight on top.

life is full of risks its imposible to avoid all of them, far better
to not stress so much.....
 
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S

snotty

I do not think it will explode without someone lighting it, but in the
sun gas tanks expend and contract and that can eventually damage the
containers.

Since this is California, the state which has more laws than the whole
rest of the country combined, it might be illegal to haul more than
one 5 gal. can in your trunk. Call your D.O.T and ask, then tell us
all. Heck, I often haul 3 five gal cans for my tractor in the back
of my pickup.
There is a world of difference between carrying gas cans in an open
pickup bed and an enclosed car trunk.
 
E

Ed

And don't forget the possibility of the curious (or destructive) teen
who comes upon these cans and decided to light a match to see what
happens.
 
R

ransley

I have a typical back yard, open mostly to the sun, where I store five
5-gallon jerry jugs of gasoline for my bikes and equipment and off-road
vehicles.

I don't see that it's all that much of a danger, considering we keep two
cars in the garage with twice that much gasoline essentially inside the
house - while this is outside along the fence.

But, my neighbor noticed the four jugs recently and asked about them. I
said I never knew gas to spontaneously explode and he said the sun could
cause it to happen. He also said it's illegal to transport more than a
single five-gallon can in your trunk (is that true?).

Is it all that dangerous to keep 20 gallons of gas in the back yard?
Is it illegal to trasnsport more than 5 gallons (California) in a car?
I would just keep it out of any direct sun, not store it for months as
some volitile components will escape through plastic, degrading the
gas, yes it airtight but not 100% impermiable and be sure you have no
enemies.
 
J

jameswaters

And don't forget the possibility of the curious (or destructive) teen
who comes upon these cans and decided to light a match to see what
happens.
And I did not think of static electricity. Actually, many years ago I
was cleaning something on my engine with a rag soaked with gas. The
engine was running (yea, I know that was stupid). One of my plug
wires had a crack or hole in the insulation. I got a nasty shock and
at the same time that rag burst into flames from the spark. Since I
was barehanded, my hand were on fire and my shirt caught too. Luckily
I tossed the rag on to the concrete driveway and did a drop and roll
on the lawn which made out the shirt fire. Then the nearby garden
hose took care of the burning rag. My hands stopped burning as soon
as I tossed the rag. In the end, my hands were mildly burned, my
shirt was trash, and a couple of the smaller 12v wires on my engine
were a little melted. It could have been much worse. I learned a big
lesson and I also replaced those crappy plug wires the same time I
taped up the melted wires.

These days if I clean anything with gas, the engine is turned off and
battery cable disocnnected. (assuming the part is attached to the
engine).
 
D

dpb

Ed Pawlowski wrote:
....
From: Stephen D. Coan, State Fire Marshal ....
In accordance with 527 CMR 8.21(5), .gasoline or other flammable
petroleum product may be transported without a permit in any open
vehicle or in a compartment of a closed vehicle separated from
passengers, ...
So you can't take gas home to mow the yard if you have only a SUV or
other trunk-less vehicle in MA...

Nanny has struck again.

--
 
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D

dpb

Bill Murphy wrote:
....
Any ideas what the laws are on transport?
While specifics vary as Ed posted, generally sotoo 20 gal is legal in
DOT-rated transport containers. It's a relatively low hazard but like
anything else, "stuff happens" and in high traffic areas or other
reasons for higher than normal accident probabilities one should be duly
aware.

OTOH, for farm use I keep a 150 gal diesel and 40 gal gasoline transport
tank in the pickup as we have done for 50 yrs or so. Compared to the
1500 gal anhydrous ammonia tank tagging along behind, the fuel risk is
quite benign... :)

As for the original question on storage, I'd try to make a shaded
location for the storage if you have no shed to minimize the chances of
lifting the safety relief on a hot day of a full can but other than that
I'd have no particular concern, either.

--
 
R

Roy

amen.  tell him to myob
==
Bullshit...the neighbor has legitimate concerns. 20 gallons of
gasoline in jerry cans stored in a trunk of a car is NOT safe. If
stored in a locked garden shed isolated from all buildings or fences
it would be much safer but not ideal. Residential areas are not
designed for the storage of volatile liquids especially in the
quantities mentioned. I would not store more than 2 gallons at the
most...this would be adequate for lawnmower and weedeater usage.
People who do what THEY want and disregard OTHERS are just selfish
jerks. I have lived next to these kinds of people in the past and
believe me, it is no picnic.
==
 
M

mkirsch1

On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 20:30:14 -0700, "Steve B"
gas in your trunk and storing in your back yard in the open air
question:


+1 on that.
-1 on that.

It's been PROVEN time and again that those "gasoline explosions" you
see in movies are not realistic. They are staged using pyrotechnics.

The expose of Dateline NBC's "expose" of the 73-87 GM truck tanks is a
classic example.

In a collision that breaches the fuel tank, the fuel dribbles out on
the ground and nothing happens. The fumes are too concentrated to
ignite, and they quickly dissipate to where there aren't enough fumes
to ignite.
 
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M

mkirsch1

On transportation - How else is the gas going to get from where it is to
where it needs to be? Perhaps it could miracle itself?
You can transport gas, but only 5 gallons at a time, and only in an
open bed or enclosed trunk.

Of course, unless you load up ten 5-gallon jugs with gas and stack
them in the back of the minivan with the kids, in front of a cop,
nobody will be any the wiser.

Unless you ADVERTISE that you're doing something illegal, nobody is
going to know you're doing something illegal...

Yeah, let's stack a dozen gas cans along the fence where the nosy
neighbor will see them and blow the whistle on you.... That's called
being a MORON.

Too bad common sense isn't common anymore.
 

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