Tile Over UnEvEn Kitchen Floor????????????????


I

infiniteMPG

We're about to start tiling a kitchen floor over stripped bare
concrete slab. We're going to be using 18" X 18" tile and we've
started noticing that the floor has quite a few uneven spots in it up
to 1/4" or so. We've heard about leveling compounds but we're kind of
new to this. We already have our cabinets mounted so whatever we use
we need to take that into consideration. Not sure what can be put
down prior to the tile to level the floor better or if something
different can be used to mount the tiles that can take up the uneven
floor?

Thanks for any help or suggestions!
 
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C

Chris

infiniteMPG said:
We're about to start tiling a kitchen floor over stripped bare
concrete slab. We're going to be using 18" X 18" tile and we've
started noticing that the floor has quite a few uneven spots in it up
to 1/4" or so. We've heard about leveling compounds but we're kind of
new to this.
Use self leveling concrete, if those spots are large, or even if the
whole floor slopes 1/4" from one end to the other. A level floor will
make much easier installing cabinets, for example.

We already have our cabinets mounted so whatever we use
we need to take that into consideration.
Ouch! Are you going to tile around the cabinets? Bad choice, IMO. Will
be a PITA to install or service a dishwasher,for example, and hope
you'll never have to replace one of the bases. Also, probably you'll
have to make more tile cuts to fit the profile of the cabinets.
Not sure what can be put
down prior to the tile to level the floor better or if something
different can be used to mount the tiles that can take up the uneven
floor?
Again I would use self leveling concrete, and would consider removing
the cabinets and covering the whole kitchen floor with tiles .

If there are only a few lower spots you could just use more mortar under
the tiles there, but there is a potential risk to leave air pockets if
you're not careful.
 
G

gpsman

Ouch! Are you going to tile around the cabinets? Bad choice, IMO. Will
be a PITA to install or service  a dishwasher,for example,  and hope
you'll never have to replace one of the bases. Also, probably you'll
have  to make  more tile cuts to fit the profile of the cabinets.
And grout up agin 'em, and have a naked grout line.

The advantages of setting cabinets on the finished floor are many, a
more finished appearance being one, but maybe a fine point few would
notice.

Without knowing the degree of evenness I can't offer a suggestion, but
I'd guess a real tilesetter could probably just level it out with
thinset as the tile goes down.

Tile on slab is a rather permanent thing, or can be if you remember to
dampen the slab first, I'd be sure I've got the tile I can live with
for a long, long time.
 
G

gpsman

Without knowing the degree of evenness I can't offer a suggestion, but
I'd guess a real tilesetter could probably just level it out with
thinset as the tile goes down.
Oh shit, he said 1/4 inch or so. In that case just level it out with
thinset and check it often and wide with 4' or better level. If you
get one a little high just beat it down into the mud.
 
C

Chris

Red said:
The floor just needs to be flat, not necessairly level.
Well, may be not everybody sees a need there, but I would have a strong
preference.
I've never used self leveling concrete. I've used those floor levelers
in bags. Expensive stuff.


How does the self leveling concrete compare to this I'm curious?
I've never used the expensive stuff you mention, so not sure how
compares. I am overly simplifying but with SLC you just pour and let it
settle. Gravity will keep the surface smooth and at the same level.
 
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Chris

Red said:
Not sure if you know any of this but I'd be curious:

How expensive is the self leveling concrete/cement?
(bags/buckets? - Coverage?)
Where can it be got?
What's the thickness range?
(the stuff I spoke of was from feather edge to 1".)
I'll leave those answers to Google. Should work in your area too.
 
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