Tile hearth advice


M

Matt

Hi,
I'm looking to construct a tiled hearth. It sits on an existing
concrete base flush with the floorboards, but I'd like to build the
hearth up a bit higher . It will be used with a gas fire eventually.

I was thinking of using 18mm MDF, probably stuck down with no-nails,
and tiling on that. Should I be worried that the MDF / adhesive will
not be fireproof, or will this be OK as it's tiled? Alternatively what
else could I use to bring the height up a bit?

Thanks...
 
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D

Dave Plowman (News)

I'm looking to construct a tiled hearth. It sits on an existing
concrete base flush with the floorboards, but I'd like to build the
hearth up a bit higher . It will be used with a gas fire eventually.
I was thinking of using 18mm MDF, probably stuck down with no-nails,
and tiling on that. Should I be worried that the MDF / adhesive will
not be fireproof, or will this be OK as it's tiled? Alternatively what
else could I use to bring the height up a bit?
Make some shuttering to go round the edge and use pre-mixed concrete. The
sheds sell it in bags.
 
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A

Andrew Gabriel

Hi,
I'm looking to construct a tiled hearth. It sits on an existing
concrete base flush with the floorboards, but I'd like to build the
hearth up a bit higher . It will be used with a gas fire eventually.

I was thinking of using 18mm MDF, probably stuck down with no-nails,
and tiling on that. Should I be worried that the MDF / adhesive will
not be fireproof, or will this be OK as it's tiled? Alternatively what
else could I use to bring the height up a bit?
You should first check the installation instructions for the
gas fire. Hearths have to be 25mm or 50mm (I can't remember which
now) above the floor. ISTR they have to be fireproof construction
within so many mm of the top too. There's also a minimum width and
depth. You don't want to build one and then find it's out of spec
for the gas fire.

I built the base of mine out of a sand/cement bed. Might be worth
adding chicken wire or a steel mesh for extra strength (I didn't
and it hasn't been an issue, but I would if I did it again).

In my case, the existing concrete base was built up from the earth
bypassing the damp proof course. I took it away, replaced the floor
joists and boards right across (which had gone rotten due to the
damp hearth base) and then built the new hearth on the floorboards.
I also left a ventilation hole so the fire draws its air from under
the suspended floor rather than bringing a cold draft across the
room.
 

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