"Temporary" mortar?


S

Sylvia

Is there such a thing as a substance that will look like mortar to hold
concrete blocks together, but be easy to knock off when I'm ready for
the concrete block wall to come down? It won't have to stand up to much
pressure and will probably be up 3-5 years, but has to look permanent to
satisfy covenants.

--
Sylvia Steiger RN, homeschooling mom since Nov 1995
http://www.SteigerFamily.com
Cheyenne WY, USDA zone 5a, Sunset zone 1a
Home of the Wyoming Wind Festival, January 1-December 31
Remove "removethis" from address to reply
 
J

Java Man (Espressopithecus)

Is there such a thing as a substance that will look like mortar to hold
concrete blocks together, but be easy to knock off when I'm ready for
the concrete block wall to come down? It won't have to stand up to much
pressure and will probably be up 3-5 years, but has to look permanent to
satisfy covenants.
No there isn't. If building codes or covenants require a concrete block
wall or foundation that is "permanent", it is advisable to bite the
bullet and use proper mortar. I assume you've looked into interlocking
blocks, and they aren't acceptable? If you're trying to save money,
note that they are also much more expensive than regular concrete blocks
held together with mortar.

If you're sure it won't need to stand up to much pressure, and in the
event of failure won't cause significant damage or injury, you could
always mix very weak mortar (too much sand and water, not enough mortar
mix). It would come apart more easily than properly mixed mortar,
although it would still be labour intensive to chip it off. You may
have difficulty finding a bricklayer who would build it for you.

Rick
 
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F

FAMILY

Sylvia,

There is no such thing as temporary mortar. I would think about the
liability issue if the wall should fail!
You could pay a mason to slap it up with out any problem. It wouldn't be
that hard to take down later.
Good luck,

Dan
 
K

Kelly

Add more sand to the mix.
The trade schools that instruct brick layer's
do this all the time so they can recycle the bricks.

But... this makes a weeker wall, and depending on
what that wall will support may couse a liablility
issue.


Is there such a thing as a substance that will look like
mortar to hold concrete blocks together, but be easy to
knock off when I'm ready for the concrete block wall to come
down? It won't have to stand up to much pressure and will
probably be up 3-5 years, but has to look permanent to
satisfy covenants.


--
Kelly Regan
Home Page: http://mysite.verizon.net/the.regans/index.html

Regan Brothers, Inc.
http://www.reganbrothers.com
 
S

Sylvia

Thanks to everyone who chimed in. That higher sand ratio is exactly
what I needed. Danger or liability isn't an issue at all, it's just for
a foundation-looking wall around our hopefully-soon-to-be-set-up mobile
home which will be properly blocked and tied down by experts. This wall
will only be 2-3 feet high, not supporting anything, and protected from
the worst of the Wyoming winds by a high hill. If it does partially
blow down, unless someone happens to be lying on the ground next to it,
the risk of injury is nil. I'm just trying to appease the neighbors who
think a "permanent" foundation wall is more attractive than traditional
skirting, while still being able to sell it and move it in a few years
when we're able to build our home.

--
Sylvia Steiger RN, homeschooling mom since Nov 1995
http://www.SteigerFamily.com
Cheyenne WY, USDA zone 5a, Sunset zone 1a
Home of the Wyoming Wind Festival, January 1-December 31
Remove "removethis" from address to reply
 
R

Ray

In alt.building.construction, Msg ID: <3F5F3098.5030207@canadaREMOVE-THIS.com>
Is there such a thing as a substance that will look like mortar to hold
concrete blocks together, but be easy to knock off when I'm ready for
the concrete block wall to come down? It won't have to stand up to much
pressure and will probably be up 3-5 years, but has to look permanent to
satisfy covenants.
You must have stuttered sylvia..
It was garbage the first time too.

In alt.building.construction, Msg ID: <4r17mvcjbr3jteq22tkvqsgnmg95nnj7in@4ax.com>

Ray
 
S

Sylvia

The mobile home salesman recommended a hardi-plank setup, too. The
problem is that I know my carpentry skills aren't up to doing it, I've
tried. I haven't tried block-and-mortaring, but I do make cakes and
jello molds and other items that involve arranging layers and keeping
them together. If I can't do the mortaring, it should become apparent
fairly quickly once I start laying blocks.

--
Sylvia Steiger RN, homeschooling mom since Nov 1995
http://www.SteigerFamily.com
Cheyenne WY, USDA zone 5a, Sunset zone 1a
Home of the Wyoming Wind Festival, January 1-December 31
Remove "removethis" from address to reply
 
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J

JD

Sylvia said:
The mobile home salesman recommended a hardi-plank setup, too. The
problem is that I know my carpentry skills aren't up to doing it, I've
tried. I haven't tried block-and-mortaring, but I do make cakes and
jello molds and other items that involve arranging layers and keeping
them together. If I can't do the mortaring, it should become apparent
fairly quickly once I start laying blocks.
Why not use mortarless block?
 
S

Sylvia

Why not use mortarless block?

I may do that for the water room (which I WON'T want to tear down in a
few years) but the cement block foundation needs to *look* permanent but
not *be* permanent.

--
Sylvia Steiger RN, homeschooling mom since Nov 1995
http://www.SteigerFamily.com
Cheyenne WY, USDA zone 5a, Sunset zone 1a
Home of the Wyoming Wind Festival, January 1-December 31
Remove "removethis" from address to reply
 
P

Phrederik

Don't you think that by now someone here would have alerted the building
inspector in your area?

The bottom of your posts basically tell everyone where you're at. The
inspector will know what to look for when inspecting that wall.
 
S

Sylvia

Don't you think that by now someone here would have alerted the
building inspector in your area?

No building inspector involvement in this. They'll be looking at the
non-permanent blocks actually supporting the house and the tiedowns (and
those are places I DON'T want to scrimp anyway). This wall is just a
cosmetic extra.

--
Sylvia Steiger RN, homeschooling mom since Nov 1995
http://www.SteigerFamily.com
Cheyenne WY, USDA zone 5a, Sunset zone 1a
Home of the Wyoming Wind Festival, January 1-December 31
Remove "removethis" from address to reply
 
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P

Phrederik

Sylvia said:
building inspector in your area?

No building inspector involvement in this. They'll be looking at the
non-permanent blocks actually supporting the house and the tiedowns (and
those are places I DON'T want to scrimp anyway). This wall is just a
cosmetic extra.
Ahhh... My apologies. I misunderstood.

I was under the impression that you were trying to make a foundation under a
trailer look permanent for an inspector.

Now it appears that you just want a block wall that will look decent and
stand up to the elements but be easy to remove if you ever want to.
 

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