T&G Kitchen Ceiling - Directly to Joists????


I

infiniteMPG

We're looking at putting up a tongue and groove ceiling in our kitchen
to match the T&G we just finished in the porch (the kitchen opens into
the porch) and we had a quick question. When we put the T&G up should
we put it directly against the joists, should be use something like
tar roofing paper first to seal the ceiling, or should we put it over
sheetrock?

There is currently a dropped ceiling we are removing so if it's best
to put it over sheetrock then we'd have to patch the ceiling where the
drop is first. Just didn't know if there was something we should put
up first before the T&G to be sure it's all sealed.

When we first did the porch we treated the top of the T&G with
Thompson's Water Sealer to be sure that the roof side is protected.
Didn't know if that was best to do here or if something else should be
attached to the joists first.

Thanks!!!
 
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E

EXT

There are a number of different ways, some traditional in your area and some
are legal building code. Much depends on where you are, warm climate, cold
climate, Europe, North America, your local building department can give you
the legal requirements and possibly some suggestions.

Personally, I would remove the old drywall and fix any electrical updates
and insulation additions, add a 6 mil vapor barrier, 1/2 drywall with seams
roughly finished then add your wood T&G strips.
 
D

dpb

infiniteMPG said:
We're looking at putting up a tongue and groove ceiling in our kitchen
to match the T&G we just finished in the porch (the kitchen opens into
the porch) and we had a quick question. When we put the T&G up should
we put it directly against the joists, should be use something like
tar roofing paper first to seal the ceiling, or should we put it over
sheetrock?
....

Interior there's really nothing to seal against--that's what the roof is
for. If it's an attic above, the use of a barrier simply to stop any
possible dust infiltration would be wise but that really would be its
only function.

As for whether to use another layer, the key is how even the joists
are--if they are close, directly to them is fine; otherwise you'll
either want to shim or use furring strips to be able to even out the
high/low spots. Of course, the joists need to be running perpendicular
to the direction you want to run the ceiling or you'll need the furring
strips to have a nailing surface the other direction.

I don't see any point in the sheetrock other than it could be the dust
barrier spoken of athough it adds weight and is much more work to hang
for to be simply covered up. And it surely wouldn't serve any purpose I
can see to even tape it at all if did...

Well, I guess there might be one facet of sheetrock as a fire retardant
barrier between floors, perhaps...

--
 
I

infiniteMPG

I think I'd want sheetrock up first.  Reason is that it is somewhat of a fire barrier, and is probably required by code.

Found this in the Florida Building Code :

B3.3.2 Wood sheathing. Wood sheathing panels shall be
considered air infiltration barriers when applied to a frame
wall underneath an exterior finish and the following sealing
requirements are met:
1. Joints formed by the square edges of adjoining panels
shall be backed by a framing member. The joints
between panels shall be sealed, or both adjoining panels
sealed to the framing member using a mastic. For
joints formed by tongue and groove edges, the groove
of the panels shall be filled with mastic prior to mating
the panels.
2. The panels shall be sealed to the top plate using a mastic.
3. The panels shall be sealed to the bottom plate, floor
deck, or header and end joists using mastic.
4. The panels shall be sealed to the jambs or mounting
fins of doors and windows using a mastic.
Tapes of any type are not acceptable sealants for sealing
wood sheathing to wood members, mounting fins, or
masonry.

B3.3.3 Nonwood sheathing. Nonwood sheathing panels
including foam insulation boards, and foil or plastic faced
boards of other materials, shall be considered air infiltration
barriers when applied to a frame wall under- neath an exterior
finish and the following sealing requirements are met:
1. Joints between adjoining panels shall be sealed using
one of the methods given for wood sheathing boards
in Section B3.3.2, (1) above or, joints between adjoining
panels shall be sealed by pressure sensitive tape
with acrylic adhesive. Rubber-based adhesive tapes
shall not be used for this purpose.
2. The panels shall be sealed to the top plate using a mastic.
3. The panels shall be sealed to the bottom plate, foundation
wall, header and end joists, floor deck, or slab
using mastic.
4. The panels shall be sealed to the jams or mounting
fins of doors and windows using a mastic.
Acrylic-based tape may be used to seal metal and
plastic door and window mounting fins to the sheathing
panels.
Tapes of any type are not acceptable sealants for sealing
nonwood sheathing to wood or masonry building components

Looks like a wood barrier is acceptable as long as there is a barrier
sheet between it and the attic and mastic is used in the groves before
assembly. Sound right?
 
D

dpb

infiniteMPG wrote:
....
Looks like a wood barrier is acceptable as long as there is a barrier
sheet between it and the attic and mastic is used in the groves before
assembly. Sound right?
No, that's sheathing...the application in question is _interior_
ceiling. Whether it's code or not, I'll agree the sheetrock would add a
certain amount of fire retardation.

--
 
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Joined
Jun 14, 2016
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especially in a kitchen all ceilings have to be fire lined use 12.5mm fire line plasterboard
 
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