Swarfega green - still good?


D

David

Many years ago I used to use the green Swarfega hand cleaner.

After that I always used Swarfega Orange (with grains in it) but
sometimes it's just a bit too rough and I want to get th "ordinary"
Swarfega.

At the web site I see Lemon; there's Natural and also Original.
http://www.deb.co.uk/ukswarfega/

Has the old green Swarfega been superceded by a better standard product
these days?
 
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M

meow2222

David said:
Many years ago I used to use the green Swarfega hand cleaner.

After that I always used Swarfega Orange (with grains in it) but
sometimes it's just a bit too rough and I want to get th "ordinary"
Swarfega.

At the web site I see Lemon; there's Natural and also Original.
http://www.deb.co.uk/ukswarfega/

Has the old green Swarfega been superceded by a better standard product
these days?
Swarfega is an expensive way to buy paraffin. Perhaps the lemon
also contains lemon oil, dont know - citrus oils give added cleaning
power.


NT
 
P

Pete C

Hi,

I use plain skin cream to clean oily dirt off hands.

Rub some on to lift most of it, wipe off with old rag.

Rub more on and use nail brush for nails and engrained dirt, wipe off
with clean rag.

Drys hands out less and no tide mark in sink either.

cheers,
Pete.
 
P

Peter Twydell

Pete said:
Hi,

I use plain skin cream to clean oily dirt off hands.

Rub some on to lift most of it, wipe off with old rag.

Rub more on and use nail brush for nails and engrained dirt, wipe off
with clean rag.

Drys hands out less and no tide mark in sink either.

cheers,
Pete.
Start off by applying barrier cream before the job.

I have a tub of Wickes barrier cream that states on the label that it
should be stored for a maximum of one year. Why?
 
S

Si

Peter Twydell said:
Start off by applying barrier cream before the job.

I have a tub of Wickes barrier cream that states on the label that it
should be stored for a maximum of one year. Why?
bacterial growth probably
 
H

Huge

Start off by applying barrier cream before the job.
Or nick some of the wife's hand cream.
I have a tub of Wickes barrier cream that states on the label that it
should be stored for a maximum of one year. Why?
Probably because the law says it must. I generally ignore "Best Before"
labelling.
 
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H

Huge

On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 08:54:12 +0100, Peter Twydell


If you look in your bathroom you'll find lots of little messages on
products saying they have a shelf life of 12M.
I recently went through my bathroom cabinet and threw away everything that was
more than 10 years past it's "Use by" date.
 
S

Stuart Noble

Huge said:
I recently went through my bathroom cabinet and threw away everything that was
more than 10 years past it's "Use by" date.
Gotta be a smart arse remark there somewhere
 
S

Steve Firth

Huge said:
I recently went through my bathroom cabinet and threw away everything that was
more than 10 years past it's "Use by" date.
I wish I coudl persuade my wife to do that with the fod cupboard.
There's a couple of tins of condensed milk in there that are 20 years
past their "use by" date. If I throw them in the bin she retrieves them.
I guess they'll become heirlooms.
 
H

Huge

Gotta be a smart arse remark there somewhere
The very next posting (which I haven't read yet) after yours is from Firthy, so
doubtless that's where it'll be. :eek:)
 
H

Huge

I wish I coudl persuade my wife to do that with the fod cupboard.
There's a couple of tins of condensed milk in there that are 20 years
past their "use by" date.
They're probably OK. My wife's pickier about this than I am and gets very
excited about food that's out of date.
If I throw them in the bin she retrieves them.
Do it when she's out.
 
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S

Steve Firth

Huge said:
They're probably OK. My wife's pickier about this than I am and gets very
excited about food that's out of date.


Do it when she's out.
Sadly we're on an "empty the bins once a fortnight" scheme. I'd have to
be cunning, and I'd probably still get earbashed about "waste".
 
C

Conor

Many years ago I used to use the green Swarfega hand cleaner.

After that I always used Swarfega Orange (with grains in it) but
sometimes it's just a bit too rough and I want to get th "ordinary"
Swarfega.

At the web site I see Lemon; there's Natural and also Original.
http://www.deb.co.uk/ukswarfega/

Has the old green Swarfega been superceded by a better standard product
these days?
I use washing up liquid and a teaspoon of sugar. Does just as good a
job.
 
W

Willy Eckerslyke

Conor said:
I use washing up liquid and a teaspoon of sugar. Does just as good a
job.
What was that you were saying about the great unwashed?
 
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P

Peter Twydell

mogga said:
If you look in your bathroom you'll find lots of little messages on
products saying they have a shelf life of 12M.


This PAO (period after opening) is indicated within an open jar
illustration that has a number inside followed by the letter M. For
example, 12M corresponds to 12 months, that is, the product should be
used within a year after opening.

If you're putting your fingers in it you'll be putting your skin cells
and bacteria in there and they might grow. OR the product may
deteriate upon opening and eventually breakdown.
If it smells ok and doesn't burn your arm off it's probably ok though.
It must be at least four years old by now. Smells the same as when it
was new and it's still effective. No burns, rashes, embarrassing pongs,
etc.

One thing I did learn was that if your bathroom door has a knob rather
than a handle, open the door before applying slippery cream to the
hands. Wasn't a problem in the previous house as the BC was kept in the
kitchen, which had a lever handle on the door.
 
B

Bramble-Stick

Conor said:
I use washing up liquid and a teaspoon of sugar. Does just as good a
job.
For many years I used cheap washingup liquid (the thin stuff, usually
green), adding white spirit a teaspoon at a time until it gelled to a thick
transparent consistency - worked a treat, and had a particular smell which I
always associated with a certain popular hand-cleaner. I just use disposable
gloves now though...
Bramblestick
 
W

Willy Eckerslyke

Bramble-Stick said:
I just use disposable
gloves now though...
The previous owner of my Land Rover had left a few latex disposable
gloves lying around in it after using them when messing about with
dieselly bits. The resulting sticky, half melted mess is one of the most
disgusting things imaginable.
 
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B

Bramble-Stick

Willy Eckerslyke said:
The previous owner of my Land Rover had left a few latex disposable gloves
lying around in it after using them when messing about with dieselly bits.
The resulting sticky, half melted mess is one of the most disgusting
things imaginable.
I find PVC rather more long-lasting in this context. Care to move this
discussion to alt.sex.fetish.landrover? :)

Bramblestick
 

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