Super heavy snow?


K

Kenny

Tim Watts wrote ...

OK - ignore part of my earlier question...

But I still wonder if it was the occupiers who fitted these or the council?

As they were tied into the wall, they must have been put up when the
houses were built. There is flushing along the wall above the joint.
 
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A

ARW

Tim said:
By council, do you mean Building Control - or are these council
houses, in which case I wonder if the council actually had these
fitted rather than the occupiers? That would be very interesting...
South Yorkshire Housing not Barnsley Council (aka Berneslai Homes), my
mistake.
 
T

Tim Watts

South Yorkshire Housing not Barnsley Council (aka Berneslai Homes), my
mistake.
I DO hope Builing Control are taking an interest...

--
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If you are reading this from a web interface eg DIY Banter,
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"It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent
moral busybodies."
 
T

The Natural Philosopher

Tim Watts wrote ...




As they were tied into the wall, they must have been put up when the
houses were built. There is flushing along the wall above the joint.
that doesn't follow at ALL.
easy enouh to add flashing and tie into an existing structure.


--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the
members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are
rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
diminishing number of producers.
 
C

Chris Holford

Mike Tomlinson said:
They just look so *wrong* somehow. Mind you, the houses themselves are
nothing special either.
Neighbours near my former house had a cantilevered carport; I always
thought it looked to be held up by optimism. I helped a friend put up
one of those retractable sunblinds (-rather like a shop blind). I was
very doubtful about the fixing method which was a couple of rag bolts
about 200mm apart vertically at each end. It didn't seem enough to take
the load when the blind was fully out. I asked on here for advice and
also phoned the suppliers; they said it was OK. A couple of years later
it's still up, but I reckon a strong wind or a few inches of snow would
bring it down.
 
D

dennis@home

Neighbours near my former house had a cantilevered carport; I always
thought it looked to be held up by optimism. I helped a friend put up
one of those retractable sunblinds (-rather like a shop blind). I was
very doubtful about the fixing method which was a couple of rag bolts
about 200mm apart vertically at each end. It didn't seem enough to take
the load when the blind was fully out. I asked on here for advice and
also phoned the suppliers; they said it was OK. A couple of years later
it's still up, but I reckon a strong wind or a few inches of snow would
bring it down.
Its retractable for a reason.
 
D

dennis@home

Difficult to tell by the pic, but is it a timber frame house where the
brickwork ain't load bearing? If so, it wouldn't take much to break it.
Gable ends aren't usually load bearing.
The roof is supported at the ends of the trussed rafters.
Sometimes the floor is supported but not always.
 
D

Dave Liquorice

[1] Raking half of a whole mortar course to insert the edge of the
flashing.
Flashing doesn't go that deep, an inch at the very most, so about 25%.
B-)
 
J

jgharston

ARW said:
South Yorkshire Housing not Barnsley Council (aka Berneslai Homes), my
mistake.
Akh! That's annoying. I'm a former board member and reserve
performance auditor. I'm going to have some questions to ask at the
next meeting.

JGH
 
H

harry

Typical journalist bollocks.
"Weight of snow", my arse - more like pissed builders and no cement in
the mortar.
The carport did not fail.
The fixings did not fail.
It fell down because there was insufficient weight of masonry above it
to form a counterweight.
It was installed in an unsuitable location.

I can see why it might be attractive not to have supports as you can
hit them in the dark whilst parking.
 
H

harry

Gable ends aren't usually load bearing.
The roof is supported at the ends of the trussed rafters.
Sometimes the floor is supported but not always.
You are a half wit.
Traditional houses are load bearing by reason of the purlins.

Only in houses with trussed roofs are they not. Even then the gable is
supposed to be tied to the roof structure.
 
H

harry

that doesn't follow at ALL.
easy enouh to add flashing and tie into an existing structure.
And what is more, it will actually weaken the wall[1] making it less
able to withstand exactly the kind of force it was going to exert on it.

[1] Raking half of a whole mortar course to insert the edge of the flashing.
Masonry walls stand by gravity so it makes little difference.
In any event the raking/cut would only be around 30mm.
 
C

Chris J Dixon

Kenny said:
Tim Watts wrote ...


As they were tied into the wall, they must have been put up when the
houses were built. There is flushing along the wall above the joint.
Plenty of companies eager to sell them, just Google cantilever
carport:

http://www.diycarports.co.uk/cantilever_carport_prices.php

http://www.windsealdoubleglazing.co.uk/cantilevercarport2.htm

http://123v.com/coppermine/displayimage/album=1/pid=32.html
We use hilti fixings for supporting our cantilever carport beams. These not only support the carport but are also capable of coping with high winds and heavy snowfalls.
http://www.diycarports.co.uk/cantilever-grp-specifications.php
The canopy has been tested at the University of Lancashire in Preston, to a snow loading of 1690kg. And to a wind load of 146mph, far in excess of whatever is likely to occur.
Chris
 
O

Owain

Admittedly there may have been a big thaw but it looks more like a
construction flaw being to blame than the snow.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-south-yorkshire-21212792

"A family has been forced to leave their home in South Yorkshire after a
part of it collapsed under the weight of the snow, the fire service has
said."

And another one, in Corby, Northants.

http://www.northantstelegraph.co.uk/community/house-s-brickwork-partially-collapses-under-weight-of-snow-1-4725455

Owain
 
J

John Williamson

Owain said:
That sort of design always strikes me as weak. For not much extra cost,
you could put in some uprights tied into the wall top and bottom, and
use these to take the torque, reducing the lateral loading on the wall
at the top.

Of course, if the wall were reinforced concrete, you'd just need to tie
the fixings into the reinforcement.
 
T

Tim+

Andy said:
http://goo.gl/maps/Bs4Jj

Didn't look as ridiculously wide as the Barnsley one, but there wasn't
that much snow on either of them (judging by nearby roofs) wonder if
the cowboys will stop fitting them to single storey gable ends?
I had a shufi at some fitting insturctions on line which seem to call for
either 900mm of brickwork above the port or the addition of vertical braces
(as visible in that Google maps link). It looks like manufactures should be
seriously rethinking their fitting advice.

I wonder who'll pay up? Home-owners insurance, the car port fitters or the
manufacturers?

Tim
 
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