Stud Wall Instruction


T

TheScullster

Hi all

Does anyone know a good link for building a stud wall?
Need info like:
Size and type of timber.
Plasterboard type/thickness.
Spacing of trimmers
etc

Want to wall off end of room to make storage cupboard - 3m wall including
door access.

TIA

Phil
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

tarquinlinbin

Well, plasterboard is 1200mm wide, so you have the choice of spacing the
studs at 600mm (cheap and quick) or 400mm (more solid).

Use 75mm x 50mm studwork. You need a footplate of the same material and a
top plate over the top. Place either one or two noggins, depending on the
height of the wall. Two is probably better, equally spaced between the
footer and header.
Whats a footplate/top-plate/noggin ?
Attach the studwork using skew nailing. Plasterboard over using 12.5mm
plasterboard, either straight edge, scrim taped and skimmed, or taper edged,
taped and filled. Use plasterboard screws. Avoid plasterboard nails.
Whats skew nailing/scrim tape
The top of the wall need securing, to stop it wobbling, especially over 3m.
How this is done depends on the situation. You may be able to attach to
joists in the ceiling above.

Christian.
Just asking as im new to plasterboard/std wall construction too !!
 
T

Tim S

Certainly, there is little to object to it. It depends how the noggins are
attached, really. With skew nailing it makes no difference, whilst other
methods are easier otherwise.

Christian.
Just out of interest, what function do the noggins perform? Stiffening the
frame or providing more places to screw the plasterboard?

I only ask, because one (at least) of the walls in my last flat didn;t
appear to have any, given the ease I pushed a bit of oval conduit up 3/4
of the height internaly to feed a new bathroom mirror-light.

Cheers

Tim
 
T

Tim S

It can be required for structural stud walls, where the structural value of
the wall is for stability of the house, resisting sideways wind loads,
rather than simple gravity load bearing.

Christian.
If it's non structural, can one omit the noggins, because it makes
dropping cables down the cavity a lot easier in the future?

Tim
 
R

Rob Morley

Well, plasterboard is 1200mm wide, so you have the choice of spacing the
studs at 600mm (cheap and quick) or 400mm (more solid).

Use 75mm x 50mm studwork. You need a footplate of the same material and a
top plate over the top. Place either one or two noggins, depending on the
height of the wall. Two is probably better, equally spaced between the
footer and header.
Why does everyone seem to use 3x2 for studwork these days instead of
4x2?
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

John Rumm

Tim said:
Just out of interest, what function do the noggins perform? Stiffening the
frame or providing more places to screw the plasterboard?
Yes, and yes....

There is also a good argument for putting a row of noggins at 1.2m
height, and then running the plasterboard horizonatally rather than
vertically. That way you can slso stagger the overlaps between top and
bottom to add more strength to the wall. The noggins in this case ensure
there are never any unsupported plasterboard edges.
 
J

John Rumm

Alex said:
It usually takes a bit of umff to get the wall in place but it will
pretty much self support while you get it exactly vertical and square.
Put the noggins in afterward so its easy to square.
I find that once I know what size noggin I need, I cut them all in
advance (quick operation with a chop/mitre saw). Then having inserted
one upright and got it plumb (and another tacked it at the other end to
hold the top plate up!), use the noggins to space out the studs fixing
as you go.

You can offer the noggin up to the first stud, and then butt the next
stud up to it (holding the noggin in place with friction). Nail through
the side of the new stud into the noggin, then use a spare noggin to
space the bottom of the stud. Skew nail that and then do the joint to
the top rail in the same way. Finally skew nail the other end of the
noggin to the original stud. You can have the frame for a wall up in
minutes like that.

================================

================================
| | T | |
| | | |\
| | | | \ 3
| | / 4 | |
| | / | |
| |==================| |
| A | B | C |--- 1
| |==================| |
| | | |
| | | | / 2
| | | |/
| | T | |
================================

================================

A = Original plumb stud
B = next noggin
C = new stud
T = temporary location of spare noggin for setting the gap

1 - 4 position and order of nail insertion (pair of 4" nails at each
location - or 90mm if using a nail gun)
 
J

John Rumm

Rob said:
Why does everyone seem to use 3x2 for studwork these days instead of
4x2?
for non load bearing partitons it takes less space and is lighter to
work with. For stuctural studwork 4x2" is still the way to go...
 
J

John Rumm

Alex said:
Seems like a good method if your going to build with head & soles up
first ... but you hint that it is faster than building on the floor ...
why?
Faster is probably whichever way is more familier for you. Frequently I
have found there is not sufficent space to build anywhere other than in
situ, and I also find it more comfortable working while standing up than
working on the floor. YMMV.
The only advantage I can see is holding the noggins in place -
which if you cut them very slightly large is not a problem with the
method I suggested (although I neglected to mention this!).
Yup nothing wrong with that. Just suggesting another method for
consideration.
 
A

Andrew Chesters

TheScullster said:
Hi all

Does anyone know a good link for building a stud wall?
Need info like:
Size and type of timber.
Plasterboard type/thickness.
Spacing of trimmers
etc

Want to wall off end of room to make storage cupboard - 3m wall including
door access.

TIA

Phil
It is mentioned in other posts, but the one that caught me was the size
of the sheets. NOT 8x4 but 1200x2400; not much, but it does matter!! :-(
 
Ad

Advertisements

M

Mike

John Rumm said:
for non load bearing partitons it takes less space and is lighter to
work with. For stuctural studwork 4x2" is still the way to go...

What counts as "structural" studwork ?
 
J

John Rumm

Mike said:
What counts as "structural" studwork ?
Load bearing (be it compressive or tensile), or subject to high lateral
forces due to e.g. wind loading.
 
T

The Natural Philosopher

Lobster said:
BCO is also likely to insist on the space in the cavity being filled
with sound insulation of some sort, which also screws up the dropping of
cables.
Not in a single dwelling. There is no requirement for sound insulation
WITHIN a property to teh best of mu knowledge.

However its occasiuobnally a good thing. So run cables BEFORE you put
psaterboard up.
 
M

Mike

The Natural Philosopher said:
Studwork which, if removed, causes the house to move alarmingly.
Surely nothing should be transferring major loads through a stud wall ?
How strong is such a wall anyway ?
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

John Rumm

Mike wrote:

Surely nothing should be transferring major loads through a stud wall ?
How strong is such a wall anyway ?
Massively... A bog standard 4x2" C16 CLS timber stud under compression
will carry 600kg all by itself long term.
 
O

Owain

The said:
Not in a single dwelling. There is no requirement for sound insulation
WITHIN a property to teh best of mu knowledge.
IIRC there is between a WC compartment and a habitable room.

Owain
 
M

Mike

John Rumm said:
Mike wrote:



Massively... A bog standard 4x2" C16 CLS timber stud under compression
will carry 600kg all by itself long term.
Yes - but how do you keep that load within the vertical timber ? Even a
little off vertical and it could collapse.

In a brick wall you will have corners or buttresses for stability and weight
transfer down the bricks spreading the load but surely in a stud all the
load goes straight down the timber it is applied to.
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

John Rumm

When discussing inclusion of rockwool under the floor on my loft
conversion, the BCO mentioned that although the plans only called up
said insulation as a fire precaution if the plasterboard to the existing
1st floor ceiling was less than 12mm, that I would probably need to
include it anyway to meet the accustic requirements that were now
included in part <letter I can't remeber>. Not sure if this is only
applicable with three or more storys, but the impression I got was that
this was a general requirement.

(as it happened I was in favour of as much sound insulation as possible
given one of the sprogs would be right above our heads!)
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads

Stud wall? 20
Stud wall 5
Stud wall 4
Stud wall thickness 1
Stud-partitioned walls 6
Plasterboarding Stud Wall 15
Stud wall question 4
Stud Partition Walls 1

Top