Solder flux/paste


O

oldyork90

I'm looking for an acid based solder paste for electrical soldering.
I haven't purchased the stuff for years. Things have changed quite a
bit. We used to refer to it as an RMA type. There seem to be so many
kinds now,; no lead, no clean. It needs to reduce aggressively.
 
J

jw

I'm looking for an acid based solder paste for electrical soldering.
I haven't purchased the stuff for years. Things have changed quite a
bit. We used to refer to it as an RMA type. There seem to be so many
kinds now,; no lead, no clean. It needs to reduce aggressively.
For electrical soldering you went Rosin Core solder. Acid flux is NOT
for electrical use. Just buy the solder with the rosin core. I dont
think rosin is sold separately.

Acid paste and acid core solder is for soldering plumbing, gutters,
sheet metal, etc. (It should be cleaned off after the soldering is
finished too, and you can not clean it off too well on electrical
components. It will corrode the components and copper wire.
 
M

mike

oldyork90 said:
I'm looking for an acid based solder paste for electrical soldering.
I haven't purchased the stuff for years. Things have changed quite a
bit. We used to refer to it as an RMA type. There seem to be so many
kinds now,; no lead, no clean. It needs to reduce aggressively.
As others have said, there's a direct relationship between a flux's
ability to solder dirty stuff and it's ability to destroy electrical
equipment it's used on.

There's info at kester.com

I have some stuff called "tinner's fluid".
Best stuff I've ever seen for soldering tin and steel stuff together.
Only ingredient listed on the bottle is hydrochloric acid.
Not sure I'd wanna use it to fix my computer.
 
N

notbob

I'm looking for an acid based solder paste for electrical soldering.
I don't know what you mean by "electrical soldering", but regardless,
DO NOT use acid core solder for electrical/electroinics soldering.
Use rosin core solder. You can still buy rolls of good 'ol 60/40
(tin/lead) rosin core, the most common still-contains-lead type of
electrical solder, at any Radio Shack. If you need a more specialized
solder for special applications, yer gonna hafta do some homework.

If you are thinking to soldering large gauge (16g or larger) wires to
something like automotive connectors, you may want to reconsider.
Might be OK to merely "tin" stranded wire, but most modern connectors
are designed to worked better w/o soldering.

nb
 
C

clare

As others have said, there's a direct relationship between a flux's
ability to solder dirty stuff and it's ability to destroy electrical
equipment it's used on.

There's info at kester.com

I have some stuff called "tinner's fluid".
Best stuff I've ever seen for soldering tin and steel stuff together.
Only ingredient listed on the bottle is hydrochloric acid.
Not sure I'd wanna use it to fix my computer.
MOST tinners fluid is hydrochloric acid with as much zinc in it as it
will disolve. Ends up being Zinc Chloride. To make it you use dilute
hydrochloric axid and add zinc untill it stops producing hydrogen
bubbles. It is a much better flux than acid alone - but is NOT
suitable for electrical work as adequate cleanup is difficult if not
impossible.

Sal Ammoniac (Aluminum Chloride) is also used as a tinning flux. It is
mildly acidic and is a component of many soldering paste fluxes and
acid core solders. Also not recommended for electrical soldering, but
it is really handy for cleaning soldering tips (in block form)
 
P

Peter

I'm looking for an acid based solder paste for electrical soldering.
I haven't purchased the stuff for years. Things have changed quite a
bit. We used to refer to it as an RMA type. There seem to be so many
kinds now,; no lead, no clean. It needs to reduce aggressively.
Don't know why you feel you need acid based flux. If you look at the
product data sheet for standard Nokorode regular paste flux, it show it
to be "acid and lead free" but usable for almost all soldering
situations. I still have a 2 oz tin of the stuff I purchased about 50
years ago and it works beautifully for electrical soldering
applications. (Never tried it for plumbing).
See: http://www.rectorseal.com/files/239/dsreglarps.htm
The material safety data sheet is here:
http://www.rectorseal.com/files/239/Nokorode Regular Paste Flux.html
 
D

Doug Miller

I'm looking for an acid based solder paste for electrical soldering.
No, you're not. You might think you are... but what you really want is
rosin-based.
I haven't purchased the stuff for years.
Apparently long enough to have forgotten what to use.
Things have changed quite a bit.
Not that much. Electrical soldering requires rosin, and *not* acid.

Just get yourself a roll of rosin-core solder. Radio Shack sells it, and
you should be able to find it at ACE Hardware or Tru-Value.
 
L

Larry W

Sal Ammoniac (Aluminum Chloride) is also used as a tinning flux. It is
mildly acidic and is a component of many soldering paste fluxes and
acid core solders. Also not recommended for electrical soldering, but
it is really handy for cleaning soldering tips (in block form)
Ammonium Chloride, actually.
 
J

JIMMIE

I don't know what you mean by "electrical soldering", but regardless,
DO NOT use acid core solder for electrical/electroinics soldering.
Use rosin core solder.  You can still buy rolls of good 'ol 60/40
(tin/lead) rosin core, the most common still-contains-lead type of
electrical solder, at any Radio Shack.  If you need a more specialized
solder for special applications, yer gonna hafta do some homework.

If you are thinking to soldering large gauge (16g or larger) wires to
something like automotive connectors, you may want to reconsider.
Might be OK to merely "tin" stranded wire, but most modern connectors
are designed to worked better w/o soldering.

nb
The flux in flux core solder isnt enough. Get a tub of it. I do a lot
of electronic soldering and mix rosin paste flux with alcohol and put
it in a pump bottle like my wife uses for nail polish remover. I paint
it on to the joint before soldering.

Jimmie
 
Joined
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Hello guys,

regarding the FLUX my choice as a technician is the CS-FLUX.The combination of the good application and low price is its biggest advantage.If you want to see more details about this product you can search on youtube for some very intresting tutorials.The following video is one of these tutorials
 

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