Small hole in glass window - what's available for fix?


H

Home Guy

Either someone did this with a BB gun, or I did this with my lawn mower,
but one of my windows (double-pane, removable inner pane) has a small
hole (maybe 1/4" in the middle of a 1/2" crater) and a couple of short
cracks radiating outward from the crater. This is (naturally) in the
outer pane. This is plate glass, about 1/8" thick.

I know that car windshield repair commercials show some sort of clear
liquid being injected into a windshield crater and makes the crater and
cracks disappear. I don't need the fancy equipment - just the liquid.

Anyone know what it is, and does the Home Despot (or other hardware
stores) sell it?
 
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O

Oren

Either someone did this with a BB gun, or I did this with my lawn mower,
but one of my windows (double-pane, removable inner pane) has a small
hole (maybe 1/4" in the middle of a 1/2" crater) and a couple of short
cracks radiating outward from the crater. This is (naturally) in the
outer pane. This is plate glass, about 1/8" thick.
De-glaze the glass pane and replace it. Done!
 
T

Tony Hwang

Home said:
Either someone did this with a BB gun, or I did this with my lawn mower,
but one of my windows (double-pane, removable inner pane) has a small
hole (maybe 1/4" in the middle of a 1/2" crater) and a couple of short
cracks radiating outward from the crater. This is (naturally) in the
outer pane. This is plate glass, about 1/8" thick.

I know that car windshield repair commercials show some sort of clear
liquid being injected into a windshield crater and makes the crater and
cracks disappear. I don't need the fancy equipment - just the liquid.

Anyone know what it is, and does the Home Despot (or other hardware
stores) sell it?
Hi,
Double pane? The seal is gone now whether hole is fixed or not.
R value near zero. Better replace the panel B4 weather gets cold.
 
H

Home Guy

Oren said:
De-glaze the glass pane and replace it. Done!
Tony said:
Double pane? The seal is gone now whether hole is fixed or not.
R value near zero. Better replace the panel B4 weather gets
cold.
I didn't think it was necessary to speak to this aspect of the problem,
but some of you would rather bring that aspect up rather than address
the question directly.

The window in question is an Anderson window unit, about 25 years old.
I don't recall off-hand how the outside pane is mounted into the wood
surround, but the inner pane is mounted into an aluminum frame that
includes some sort of thin rubber/vinyl seal that presses against it's
side of the surround. There are thin clips mounted into this aluminum
frame that hold the inner pane in place. This is a double-pane window,
but it's not air tight (never was) but I guess it's reasonably
air-tight.

So the short answer to both of your comments is that I'm not going to
replace the broken pane.
Yea, that's nice. I'll just phone up the port of SHANGHAI and place an
escrow order for a case of "all purpose 50cps automotive windshield
repair".

But your link does give this little nugget:

U&R windshield repair resin

Hmmm. I wonder what website might specialize in windshield repair
resin.

Wouldn't it be cool if there was something like, oh, something corny
like

http://www.windshieldrepairresin.org/

Well wouldn't ya know.

Too bad that I'm up here in the people's republic of Kanada - where the
only other place in the world where it's harder to buy specialty retail
products is North Korea.
 
T

Tony Hwang

Home said:
I didn't think it was necessary to speak to this aspect of the problem,
but some of you would rather bring that aspect up rather than address
the question directly.

The window in question is an Anderson window unit, about 25 years old.
I don't recall off-hand how the outside pane is mounted into the wood
surround, but the inner pane is mounted into an aluminum frame that
includes some sort of thin rubber/vinyl seal that presses against it's
side of the surround. There are thin clips mounted into this aluminum
frame that hold the inner pane in place. This is a double-pane window,
but it's not air tight (never was) but I guess it's reasonably
air-tight.
Hi,
As a mattter of fact, I am in Calgary. This afternoon my glazier came
and replaced 3 double pane panels which sprang a leak. Replacing 3
panels 5'x7'. two 2'x5', total time it took working inside, less than 2
hours. Cost was ~one grand, warranty is 10 years. Custom ordered Low E
Argon gas filled panel with mullion bars. Old ones were already fogging
up from the changing weather.
 
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B

Bob F

Home said:
Either someone did this with a BB gun, or I did this with my lawn
mower, but one of my windows (double-pane, removable inner pane) has
a small hole (maybe 1/4" in the middle of a 1/2" crater) and a couple
of short cracks radiating outward from the crater. This is
(naturally) in the outer pane. This is plate glass, about 1/8" thick.

I know that car windshield repair commercials show some sort of clear
liquid being injected into a windshield crater and makes the crater
and cracks disappear. I don't need the fancy equipment - just the
liquid.

Anyone know what it is, and does the Home Despot (or other hardware
stores) sell it?
I patched such a hole with clear epoxy, which at least forms a proper seal from
the rain. Put clear tape on both sides, leaving the top open on the large hole
side so you can drip just the right amount of mixed epoxy in, then press the
tape over it to form a reasonable flat patch. Peel the tape off after it cures.
 
J

Jerry Ohio Also

Wide clear packing tape from work. If you have a job.

Jr.
 
J

Jerry Ohio Also

If you work in a factory with a shipping department.

Jr.
 
E

EXT

Tony Hwang said:
Hi,
As a mattter of fact, I am in Calgary. This afternoon my glazier came and
replaced 3 double pane panels which sprang a leak. Replacing 3 panels
5'x7'. two 2'x5', total time it took working inside, less than 2 hours.
Cost was ~one grand, warranty is 10 years. Custom ordered Low E
Argon gas filled panel with mullion bars. Old ones were already fogging up
from the changing weather.
Yeah, I got ripped off by a local glass company, charged similar prices to
replace some failed sealed units. They failed within 3 years and I got my
replacements made at a factory for only $30.00 each, insulated separators,
low-E and all the bells and whistles. When I pulled the failed replacement
units, I found the local guy had cheated not only in price but in quality,
the separators were aluminum not insulated, and they were only 3/8" thick,
not the normal 1/2. My new units were ordered at 9/16" thick.
 
O

Oren

I didn't think it was necessary to speak to this aspect of the problem,
but some of you would rather bring that aspect up rather than address
the question directly.
You wanted a "fix". The fix to replace the glass pane is one you
didn't like. My suggestion still stands.

Pardon me if I'm mistaken, but are you not the guy that saves money
stealing movies from the Internet?

If I'm wrong I apologize in advance. If I'm correct, spend the money
saved on a sash pane.

Post a picture and we can tell you how to get the sash out and you can
find a local glass shop to take it too.
 
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R

Ron

I didn't think it was necessary to speak to this aspect of the problem,
but some of you would rather bring that aspect up rather than address
the question directly.

The window in question is an Anderson window unit, about 25 years old.
I don't recall off-hand how the outside pane is mounted into the wood
surround, but the inner pane is mounted into an aluminum frame that
includes some sort of thin rubber/vinyl seal that presses against it's
side of the surround.  There are thin clips mounted into this aluminum
frame that hold the inner pane in place.  This is a double-pane window,
but it's not air tight (never was) but I guess it's reasonably
air-tight.

So the short answer to both of your comments is that I'm not going to
replace the broken pane.


Yea, that's nice.  I'll just phone up the port of SHANGHAI and place an
escrow order for a case of "all purpose 50cps automotive windshield
repair".  

But your link does give this little nugget:

   U&R windshield repair resin

Hmmm.  I wonder what website might specialize in windshield repair
resin.

Wouldn't it be cool if there was something like, oh, something corny
like

   http://www.windshieldrepairresin.org/

Well wouldn't ya know.

Too bad that I'm up here in the people's republic of Kanada - where the
only other place in the world where it's harder to buy specialty retail
products is North Korea.
Windshield repair kits can only be used on laminated glass. Either
replace the unit, or plug the hole with whatever you like. The unit is
gonna end up fogging up, which is going to leave water stains. So you
can replace it now or later.
 
R

Ron

You wanted a "fix". The fix to replace the glass pane is one you
didn't like. My suggestion still stands.

Pardon me if I'm mistaken, but are you not the guy that saves money
stealing movies from the Internet?

If I'm wrong I apologize in advance.  If I'm correct, spend the money
saved on a sash pane.

Post a picture and we can tell you how to get the sash out and you can
find a local glass shop to take it too.
Ha....if he has a typical wooden Anderson from 25 yrs ago it's
probably an Anderson that you need a router to get the glass out. A
lot of the Andersons from that era (and earlier) built the frame
around the glass!
 
H

Home Guy

Ron said:
It will ONLY work on laminated glass.
I know that's what it says, but cracked laminated glass is still broken
glass all the same. This stuff has to "stick" to glass and fill any
cracks in the glass - regardless if there's a layer of plastic in the
glass or not.
 
R

Ron

Read it again- removable inner pane, not insulated glass. For OP- forget
it- there is no pretty repair.  The car windshield repairs work because
they have a plastic center layer, and you can suck all the air out as
you are adding the plastic. No way to do that with air on both sides of
pane. If you can't afford to replace right now, just clean the area, and
apply clear tape over it- that should get you through the winter. If you
wanna disguise it, get one of those bird stickers that supposedly
prevent bird kamikaze attacks. But if you can remove the frame
containing the damaged glass to carry it in to the window shop, you may
be surprised how cheap the repair is.
I misread it too, but the bottom line is it can't be "repaired". It
needs to be replaced. And if it's the kind of Anderson that I think it
is, he will need a router, or be damn good with a hammer and wood
chisel.
 
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H

Home Guy

Ron said:
Windshield repair kits can only be used on laminated glass.
Why should it matter whether or not there's a plastic layer buried
somewhere inside the broken / cracked glass?

If this resin is supposed to flow into cracks and seal them, adhere or
bond the cracked surfaces together, then we're still talking about a
glass-to-glass interface that needs bonding / sealing.
The unit is gonna end up fogging up, which is going to leave water
stains. So you can replace it now or later.
This is in a small commercial building that does not have a humidifier
as part of the HVAC system, so there will not be any fogging.
 
R

Ron

I know that's what it says, but cracked laminated glass is still broken
glass all the same.  This stuff has to "stick" to glass and fill any
cracks in the glass - regardless if there's a layer of plastic in the
glass or not.
Fine....go ahead and buy it. I was only in the glass business for
close to 25 yrs (the majority of it in auto glass), but you know more
about it than I do................
 
R

Ron

Why should it matter whether or not there's a plastic layer buried
somewhere inside the broken / cracked glass?  

If this resin is supposed to flow into cracks and seal them, adhere or
bond the cracked surfaces together, then we're still talking about a
glass-to-glass interface that needs bonding / sealing.

Because, before the resin is pumped in, a vacuum is applied to remove
all of the air from the runs (cracks).
 
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R

Ron

Lotsa luck in getting the resin in the cracks without pulling a vacuum
on the broken area. Google for a picture of how windshield star repairs
are done, maybe it will make sense to you.  Go ahead and try- you can't
make it any worse.
And, it's not always as simple as some of those videos make it out to
be. When I was in the glass business I had a professional windshield
repair kit/machine, and it was still a PITA to get the resin to flown
into the cracks sometimes. There is a flexing technique that sometimes
has to be used. Sometimes you have to heat the inside of the
windshield with a small torch. Not just any "Joe Blow" can
successfully repair a stone chip. Especially with those kits from an
auto parts store.
 

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