Shed door - Cheapish timber


5

51

Hi al.
Looking through Build Center timber catalogue.
Is redwood pse a good choice for shed door (will see plenty of rain)
(looking at G06552 for stiles) 44m x 94mm) for the stiles.

Using thermowood 25mm PMV T&G cladding to fill.

2 coats of undercoat and good gloss to finnish.


Adequate or no?

Arthur
 
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A

Andy Dingley

51 said:
Looking through Build Center timber catalogue.
Is redwood pse a good choice for shed door (will see plenty of rain)
Any "build center" is an expensive place to buy poor timber, compared
to a real timberyard. Search!

"Redwood" is a bit of a catch-all term for a number of species,
especially in bludgers' merchants. Sequoia (real redwood) would be
ideal. Eastern Red Cedar also a good choice. Douglas Fir is probably
your most likely candidate and would be OK too -- better
constructionally and for strength, not quite so weatherproof. Larch is
great for building sheds, but it's a bit prone to twist and so I
wouldn't use it for a door unless I could choose the boards.

Spruces, hemlock and pines are what you want to avoid.
 
W

Weatherlawyer

Stuart said:
Even redwood will last quite well if it can dry out after it gets wet.
Fencing only usually rots at the bottom where it sits in water or the
sun doesn't reach it
Redwood as an industry standard varies from whitewood in that it will
absorb preservative and the grain will give a better finish.

Whitewood is used in first fix and red in second fix. Joinery quality
redwood is any of the species used in that class which has few knots
and no dead knots.

It's the knots you need to watch out for. You'd best check a search
engine for grading timber before choosing but there isn't that much to
look for if you have the time and the choice.
 
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5

51

Weatherlawyer said:
Redwood as an industry standard varies from whitewood in that it will
absorb preservative and the grain will give a better finish.

Whitewood is used in first fix and red in second fix. Joinery quality
redwood is any of the species used in that class which has few knots
and no dead knots.

It's the knots you need to watch out for. You'd best check a search
engine for grading timber before choosing but there isn't that much to
look for if you have the time and the choice.
Good info.
Thanks gents.

Arthur
 

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