self-cleaning water heaters


J

JRStern

I see Home Depot has a line of GE/Rheem gas water heaters:

* 40 gallon, 6 year warranty, $488
* 38 gallon, 9 year warranty, self-cleaning, $498
* 40 gallon, 12 year warranty, self-cleaning, $578

Other specs seem the same.

My question is, what does this self-cleaning mean, and is it likely
that the extra bucks for the 12-year is a good investment?



(given that I'll also be paying to have them install it, which given
venting and access issues will at least double the cost, the extra $80
isn't a big deal, but I'm still curious about it)

--

(not sure if this link will work, comparing three models)
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs...dComp_2=100614632&N=10000003+90048+527050+780

Thanks.

J.
 
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T

The Daring Dufas

JRStern said:
I see Home Depot has a line of GE/Rheem gas water heaters:

* 40 gallon, 6 year warranty, $488
* 38 gallon, 9 year warranty, self-cleaning, $498
* 40 gallon, 12 year warranty, self-cleaning, $578

Other specs seem the same.

My question is, what does this self-cleaning mean, and is it likely
that the extra bucks for the 12-year is a good investment?



(given that I'll also be paying to have them install it, which given
venting and access issues will at least double the cost, the extra $80
isn't a big deal, but I'm still curious about it)

--

(not sure if this link will work, comparing three models)
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs...dComp_2=100614632&N=10000003+90048+527050+780

Thanks.

J.
The self cleaning units, if I remember correctly, have a cold
water supply tube that goes all the way to the bottom of the
tank and is curved in such a way that it swirls the water
around which keeps the sediment stirred up so it goes out with
the hot water.

TDD
 
J

JRStern

The self cleaning units, if I remember correctly, have a cold
water supply tube that goes all the way to the bottom of the
tank and is curved in such a way that it swirls the water
around which keeps the sediment stirred up so it goes out with
the hot water.
Heh, just what I wanted to know! High tech at it's best!

I presume it works somewhat, at least sounds like it can do no harm.

Thanks.

J.
 
C

clare

I see Home Depot has a line of GE/Rheem gas water heaters:

* 40 gallon, 6 year warranty, $488
* 38 gallon, 9 year warranty, self-cleaning, $498
* 40 gallon, 12 year warranty, self-cleaning, $578

Other specs seem the same.

My question is, what does this self-cleaning mean, and is it likely
that the extra bucks for the 12-year is a good investment?



(given that I'll also be paying to have them install it, which given
venting and access issues will at least double the cost, the extra $80
isn't a big deal, but I'm still curious about it)
The "self cleaning" means it has a "turbulator" inlet - basically the
inlet tube goes to the bottom of the tank and then makes an arc around
the outer circumference of the tank - water coming in agitates the
water in the bottom of the tank reducing sediment deposits.

As for the 9 vs 12 year warranty it's basically just a better
"insurance policy" - tank is in most respects the same. Might have an
additional anode in the 12 year tank. For less than $30 a year I'd be
REAL tempted to spring for the 12 year tank.
 
D

Dom S.

Yes, it works. Just checked mine after 10 years.
No sediment came out of the drain.
10 yrs? Who is the manufacturer, that's a pretty good life span. And, what
was the HW tank rated in # of yrs to begin with?
Thanks.
 
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H

hallerb

vertex now quaifies for the tax credit, 1500 bucks installed around
here
 
J

Jules

Yes, it works. Just checked mine after 10 years.
No sediment came out of the drain.
That sounds like mine (not self-cleaning). Sediment was there, but no
sediment came out of the drain because the drain valve's water pathway
is too small and angular to allow the sediment to come out. :)

(it seemed to be about 1/4" x 1/4" in places - so all it takes is for a
flake of scale larger than that to fall to the bottom of the tank, and
nothing will escape the drain valve except water - giving the impression
that there's no sediment in there)
 
H

hallerb

That sounds like mine (not self-cleaning). Sediment was there, but no
sediment came out of the drain because the drain valve's water pathway
is too small and angular to allow the sediment to come out. :)

(it seemed to be about 1/4" x 1/4" in places - so all it takes is for a
flake of scale larger than that to fall to the bottom of the tank, and
nothing will escape the drain valve except water - giving the impression
that there's no sediment in there)
some areas get no sediment, till the lining fails..........
 
I

in2dadark

I see Home Depot has a line of GE/Rheem gas water heaters:

* 40 gallon, 6 year warranty, $488
* 38 gallon, 9 year warranty, self-cleaning, $498
* 40 gallon, 12 year warranty, self-cleaning, $578

Other specs seem the same.

My question is, what does this self-cleaning mean, and is it likely
that the extra bucks for the 12-year is a good investment?

(given that I'll also be paying to have them install it, which given
venting and access issues will at least double the cost, the extra $80
isn't a big deal, but I'm still curious about it)

--

(not sure if this link will work, comparing three models)http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/THDProductCompare?...

Thanks.

J.
Self cleaning means you pay more and it dies anyway..
 
S

Stormin Mormon

You been checking it every six months or so, to see if
sediment gets started?

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..
Yes, it works. Just checked mine after 10 years.
No sediment came out of the drain.
10 yrs? Who is the manufacturer, that's a pretty good life
span. And, what
was the HW tank rated in # of yrs to begin with?
Thanks.
 
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J

Jules

In water heaters, this builds up to a "paste"
that can't be flushed out using the water heater drain.
In time, the water heater must be replaced.
I suspect you can still back-flush it, or remove the lower element and
scrape it with something - it might not get it all, but if it's done
every once in a while (annually, say) it can probably be done well enough
to extend the life of the tank considerably - up until the point that
the tank outright fails, I suppose.
 

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