sand/clay from my yard - useful?


N

Nate Nagel

Hi again,

yesterday I started a project I'd been putting off for a while. To
explain, I guess I need to give some background - we bought this house
about a year and a half ago. The previous owners were very ecologically
minded and the entire yard is covered with inches of dark, rich
decomposed mulch- great stuff. About 20 years' worth, to be exact, and
the previous owners also planted some really great plants and flowers.
However, they apparently did not understand the concept of proper
grading - all around the house the grade level sloped in toward the
house. I graded the side yard last year when we had an A/C unit
installed, but the front still wasn't done. Yesterday I decided to
start on the south side of the front yard, because it was all infested
with chickweed anyway. I just shaved off the first inch or so and
tossed it on the compost pile and then started grading. I got down
another inch or two and hit the *original* "soil" which appears to be a
sand/clay mix. So what I ended up doing was moving the topsoil out of
the way, digging up some of the sand/clay and removing it, and then
putting the topsoil back, mixing it with a little of the sand/clay to
give it a little body. i figure that will make even better soil for
planting.

Question is, what do I do with the excess sand/clay that I removed? I
do have plans at some vague point in the future to put in some flagstone
walkways, can I just save this stuff for that? If the answer is
"maybe," how do I evaluate it to see whether it's suitable or not? If
it's not, how the hell do I get rid of it? I've had a hard enough time
getting rid of the "good stuff" where I've wanted to do so, I assume I'd
have to pay someone to haul off simple fill, but I don't know where to
start.

thanks,

nate
 
P

Pete C.

Nate said:
Hi again,

yesterday I started a project I'd been putting off for a while. To
explain, I guess I need to give some background - we bought this house
about a year and a half ago. The previous owners were very ecologically
minded and the entire yard is covered with inches of dark, rich
decomposed mulch- great stuff. About 20 years' worth, to be exact, and
the previous owners also planted some really great plants and flowers.
However, they apparently did not understand the concept of proper
grading - all around the house the grade level sloped in toward the
house. I graded the side yard last year when we had an A/C unit
installed, but the front still wasn't done. Yesterday I decided to
start on the south side of the front yard, because it was all infested
with chickweed anyway. I just shaved off the first inch or so and
tossed it on the compost pile and then started grading. I got down
another inch or two and hit the *original* "soil" which appears to be a
sand/clay mix. So what I ended up doing was moving the topsoil out of
the way, digging up some of the sand/clay and removing it, and then
putting the topsoil back, mixing it with a little of the sand/clay to
give it a little body. i figure that will make even better soil for
planting.

Question is, what do I do with the excess sand/clay that I removed? I
do have plans at some vague point in the future to put in some flagstone
walkways, can I just save this stuff for that? If the answer is
"maybe," how do I evaluate it to see whether it's suitable or not? If
it's not, how the hell do I get rid of it? I've had a hard enough time
getting rid of the "good stuff" where I've wanted to do so, I assume I'd
have to pay someone to haul off simple fill, but I don't know where to
start.
You probably don't have enough material for a "Free clean fill" sign to
work, but calling a few local landscapers might find one that needs a
small amount of fill for a project they're working on who would be
willing to pick it up.
 
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E

Edwin Pawlowski

Nate Nagel said:
Question is, what do I do with the excess sand/clay that I removed? I do
have plans at some vague point in the future to put in some flagstone
walkways, can I just save this stuff for that? If the answer is "maybe,"
how do I evaluate it to see whether it's suitable or not? If it's not,
how the hell do I get rid of it? I've had a hard enough time getting rid
of the "good stuff" where I've wanted to do so, I assume I'd have to pay
someone to haul off simple fill, but I don't know where to start.
There are always people looking for clean fill. I often see signs in yards
"clean fill wanted" You just have a logistics problem to get it from your
place to theirs. Try putting an ad in a local free shopper paper and you
may get some takers.
 
N

Nate Nagel

Edwin said:
There are always people looking for clean fill. I often see signs in yards
"clean fill wanted" You just have a logistics problem to get it from your
place to theirs. Try putting an ad in a local free shopper paper and you
may get some takers.
You'd think, but no. Even the topsoil, which I've been giving away, has
been a hassle with all but a few people. I'd put an ad on Craigslist
and people would want me to load and deliver 50 miles away. All I want
is someone to show up, help me shovel it into my truck (that way they
can see what they're getting and I won't be completely worn out,) and
then I'll drive it to their house, but apparently that's too much work
for some people...

nate
 
T

Tomes

Nate Nagel said:
You'd think, but no. Even the topsoil, which I've been giving away, has
been a hassle with all but a few people. I'd put an ad on Craigslist and
people would want me to load and deliver 50 miles away. All I want is
someone to show up, help me shovel it into my truck (that way they can see
what they're getting and I won't be completely worn out,) and then I'll
drive it to their house, but apparently that's too much work for some
people...
Where are you?
 
E

EXT

Nate Nagel said:
You'd think, but no. Even the topsoil, which I've been giving away, has
been a hassle with all but a few people. I'd put an ad on Craigslist and
people would want me to load and deliver 50 miles away. All I want is
someone to show up, help me shovel it into my truck (that way they can see
what they're getting and I won't be completely worn out,) and then I'll
drive it to their house, but apparently that's too much work for some
people...
Been there, done that. I grew a surplus amount of vegetables, offered them
free to friends, particularly those with low income, pick the fruit or pull
the vegetable and it is yours, free.

That was too much trouble or work, they wanted me up pick, wash and deliver.
No way, I'll let it rot, and they can pay store prices.
 
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A

aemeijers

EXT said:
Been there, done that. I grew a surplus amount of vegetables, offered them
free to friends, particularly those with low income, pick the fruit or pull
the vegetable and it is yours, free.

That was too much trouble or work, they wanted me up pick, wash and deliver.
No way, I'll let it rot, and they can pay store prices.
Chuckle. Some folks at my office, evidently now retired, used to sneak
in early and leave bags of veggies on people's desks. Some were good,
some not so much, but I appreciated the thought. Once in a blue moon,
now, there will be a bag of veggies left in the break room.
 
M

Marina

You'd think, but no. Even the topsoil, which I've been giving away,
has been a hassle with all but a few people. I'd put an ad on
Craigslist and people would want me to load and deliver 50 miles away.
All I want is someone to show up, help me shovel it into my truck
(that way they can see what they're getting and I won't be completely
worn out,) and then I'll drive it to their house, but apparently
that's too much work for some people...

nate
gee, what do they want for free!
How about a co-op in town? They aren't scared of a little dirt.
 
L

letterman

Put an ad on Craigslist "FREE FILL". Someone will take it. I have
the opposite problem. I have a basement that needs to be filled, so
I'd be the kind of guy to take it if I was nearby.
 
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O

Oren

Been there, done that. I grew a surplus amount of vegetables, offered them
free to friends, particularly those with low income, pick the fruit or pull
the vegetable and it is yours, free.

That was too much trouble or work, they wanted me up pick, wash and deliver.
No way, I'll let it rot, and they can pay store prices.
My friend tells me the story of his grandfather. Up at dawn, they have
breakfast. Out in the garden/farm; my friend just wants to play and do
no work!

At lunch, he gets a glass of sweet iced tea. His pappy told him, if
you don't grow it you don't eat!

He is one on the hardest workers I know today :)
 

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