rusty toilet tank bolts


J

jay-n-123

In one of the toilet tanks in my house, the heads of the bolts in the tank
look all rusty and deformed. They looked that way 3 years ago when I moved
in here, and haven't leaked yet.

Since nothing is leaking, I'm just wondering if I need to address this, or
should I leave well enough alone. Since my female friend moved out, nobody
is using the toilet on a regular basis.

FYI: This toilet is a Gerber. Replacement of the tank bolts looks like it
would involve removing the entire tank, because there are hex nuts attached
to the bolts at the bottom of the tank. The nut is between the bottom of
the tank and bowl. At the very tail end of the bolts are wing nuts. In
other words, it looks like, to access the hex nut, this would involve
unscrewing the wing nuts and lifting the entire tank, unless there are tools
thin enough to reach the hex nut. Do any such tools exist? The gap is very
small. Another issue is that the heads of the bolts appear to be so
deformed that there isn't any slot remaining to stick a screwdriver.
Should I leave well enough alone if it's not leaking?

Thanks,

J.
 
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A

alvinamorey

(...)

Yep.
Or drain the tank, sponge as dry as you can and let it air dry till
it's completely dry. Then coat the heads and a little of the
surrounding tank with silicone. That way they wont rust further.
 
H

hallerb

Or drain the tank, sponge as dry as you can and let it air dry till
it's completely dry. Then coat the heads and a little of the
surrounding tank with silicone. That way they wont rust further.
at replacement time its easiest to use sawzall under tank to cut bolts
off.

I wouldnt disturb the current situation but drying and silicone is
excellent idea.

I put silicone on all drain connections at install, havent had a
single leak.

got this idea from a plumber who I had come for a stuborn leak, he did
the silicone thing.

his education cost me 80 bucks but that was 15 years ago, I have put
it to excellent use ever since!
 
T

terry

Or drain the tank, sponge as dry as you can and let it air dry till
it's completely dry. Then coat the heads and a little of the
surrounding tank with silicone. That way they wont rust further.
Suggestion. Leave it alone for the moment. But eventually the bolts
may rust further and you may get drips/leaks. Have a bowl or can
ready! When it does turn off water to the toilet tank.
The bolt heads probably sit on rubber washers inside the tank, which
may also deteriorate.
Be ready when it does come time to replace, with some stainless bolts
of right length (or even a bit longer if they will fit) four or six
new rubber washers, stainless steel washers etc. You can use nuts or
wing nuts underneath to tighten, but DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN and crack the
porcelain! Just snug down gently so toilet tank does not wobble or
shift around.
One one occasion we had to work at removing a very rusty bolt; why
don't they supply brass or stainless?
A combination of pecking away at the bolt with a hacksaw blade (not
much space) and then breaking off the remainder of the bolt without
damaging the porcelain took about half an hour! With ones head at
height of the toilet bowl! Patience is a virtue. With us maintenance
is critical cos we only have one toilet. Good luck.
Silicon caulking may also help but sounds more like a temporary fix?
 
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B

Bumpy

I agree with Steve, Dremel is the greatest for that , with a
good metal cutting blade. I also used it under the kitchen
to cut the large basin nut because it was corroded and leaking.

I just got out the Dremel, cut the large nut in 2 pieces, and removed the
old drain in minutes! DO NOT FORGET SAFETY GOOGLES!!
 
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