Round clay tile roof leaks, needs repair


I

Ike

First, I am not a builder so cut me some slack if I use the wrong
terminology.

Here is the situation: We are interested in buying a house that the
owner is now deceased and the son lives in another state. The house
has some existing water damage that had (sort of) been previously
repaired. The drywall on the ceiling has been cut away to reveal the
damage. They previously fixed the damaged rafter (? the beam that
slopes upward to the peek of the roof) by smearing some white plaster
looking stuff on it but did not fix the source of the leak. It appears
the wood has the beginnings of dry rot -- slightly soft for the first
1/8" of depth in an area about one foot long. We are in the desert so
there is not much rain here.

The damage and the plaster stuff is where the rafter meets the eave
which would indicate that the leak is somewhere higher up on the roof
-- the water gets in somewhere and runs down under the round cement
shingles (made to look like clay) until it finds its way under the
fabric and the plywood, near the bottom edge of the roof, and then
exits about 2 feet from the bottom edge of the roof and soaks the
rafter.

The son wants us to make an offer on the house "as is" so we do not
have a way to determine the extent of the repair costs. The house is
15 years old, on a prime location and the interior has been extremely
well maintained which means that after fixing the roof, this would be
a very nice little home.

I am going to make a few assumptions and would like someone to correct
me if I am wrong:

1. The only way to find the leak is to remove all the round cement
tiles and the fabric upwards from the leak to find where the water is
getting in. There do not appear to be any broken tiles. I did notice
on another part of the roof that the flashing does not extend out far
enough to reach the tile so the water runs off the flashing and under
the tile. Many of the tiles on the side of the house have their
corners chipped away from the roofer missing the nail and hitting the
tile instead. It appears to be a poor roofing job.

2. There would be a lot of tile breakage meaning that new tiles would
have to be purchased.

3. There could be additional water damage discovered including more
dry rot and possibly mold (none observed).

4. The house is 55' x 45'. It would be very expensive to remove the
tile, find the leak, fix it and any damage. The cost could vary from
$5,000 up to $25,000 if the entire roof needed to be done over.

Do my assumptions sound about right? How much should it cost to have a
professional roofer assess the situation?
 
D

dadiOH

Ike said:
4. The house is 55' x 45'. It would be very expensive to remove the
tile, find the leak, fix it and any damage. The cost could vary from
$5,000 up to $25,000 if the entire roof needed to be done over.
I'm not sure what you mean by "fabric". Tiles - whether clay or
concrete - are basically pretty-pretties, not meant to make a
structure watertight. That is done by what is *under* the tiles - in
my case, 90# roofing hot mopped on. The type of membrane and the
skill with which it was applied are crucial to the water tightness of
the roof..

If that is what you mean then yes, tiles and it would have to be
removed. As far a cost of totally re-roofing, you don't *have* to
have a tile roof, sure cheaper without.


--
dadiOH
____________________________

dadiOH's dandies v3.05...
....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
 
Ad

Advertisements

I

Ike

As far a cost of totally re-roofing, you don't *have* to
have a tile roof, sure cheaper without.
There are CC&R's in this development so, yes, the tiles are required.
And, I have no idea what is under the tiles to make the roof
waterproof. I only know that 'something' is under the tiles besides
plywood. I have never seen them hot mop a roof prior to tiling in this
area (Las Vegas).
 
R

Ron

If you're not sure of what needs to be done or how to do it, get several
bids from reputable roofers.
 
I

Ike

If you're not sure of what needs to be done or how to do it, get several
bids from reputable roofers.
I know that is the obvious answer, but here in Vegas there is so much
construction work that it is very difficult to get someone to show up
for a paying job. My assumption is I'll have to pay just to get a
repair estimate. The problem is the real cost of repair will likely
not be known until the tiles are pulled up.

I think I will need to make my offer based on a complete roof repair.
 
I

Ike

As other posters have said, the tiles only provide UV protection for the
underlayment, which is usually 90lb organic felt that is hot mopped or cold
adhesive attached over a base sheet of 15lb or 30lb organic felt. The life
expectancy of this roofing system is about 20 years in a hot climate. The
underlayment provides the water tightness. The most common failure mode is
when the top (cap) sheet is inadequately fastened to the base sheet, either
because of a lack of adhesive, wrong adhesive, or poor installation where
overlapping layers of the cap sheet aren't 'back nailed'. Eventually the
underlayment either slips down or cracks, and the water comes in. You are
correct that the leak is likely above where the water is coming in. Usually
you will see blacked sheating where the water has been present.

Since it sounds like the leak has been long existing, at a minimum you
should plan on having a roofer remove tiles above the affected area up to
the ridge. If you find water damage to the plywood / OSB sheathing the
damaged sheating should be replaced and a new underlayment system patched
in, overlapping at least 6" in each direction over the old underlayment.
Then the tiles can be reinstalled.

If it were my home, I would just install a new tile roof rather than put
money into a roof that is near end of life anyway. Here in Florida a good
quality tile roof costs about $400 / square (100 square feet). If you do
reroof, I would recommend using a non-organic underlayment system such as
GAF's Ultima 80 base sheet with a modified bitumen cap sheet hotmopped (or
cold applied) on top of it. Use galvalume in the valleys and for all other
flashings. That underlayment system should last 40 years when covered with
tile. Attach the tile using a foam system such as Polyfoam or Dow TileBond,
thus avoiding the penetrations of the underlayment that are caused by nails
or screws.

Hope this helps.
Travis, your information is very helpful. Thank you!
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

Jeff Cochran

The son wants us to make an offer on the house "as is" so we do not
have a way to determine the extent of the repair costs.
You most certainly do. Call up a local roofer/contractor, tell them
you are looking at the house to purchase and need an estimate.

Jeff
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top