Replacement for Carrier multi-zone control


P

Peter Pearson

My Carrier Comfort Zone Center appears to have failed, and
I'm trying to educate myself on replacement options. My
local furnace shop says they don't make these any more and
a replacement controller will cost $2946 if we can use the
existing temperature sensors. That seems like a lot.

Here's the equipment running my 4-zone system, which
really ought to be a 5-zone system but maybe they didn't
make those when this system was installed, apparently
in 1991 (I moved here in 2004):

Carrier Crusade gas furnace
Carrier Comfort Zone Center control box near furnace
Carrier Comfort Zone 4-zone controller/timeclock
Zone dampers: PEI / AirPax

In case anyone cares about the problem motivating this
questions: The "Carrier Comfort Zone Center" is mounted on
studs near the furnace, gets 24 volts AC from the furnace,
and is supposed to supply 10 volts DC to the thermostat,
but instead supplies a voltage varying between 6 and 7
volts with a regular period of about 0.5 second. The
circuit boards in the "Comfort Zone Center" look clean,
and no components are smoking, oozing, or making crackling
noises.

So,
1. Should I pay $2934 to replace this controller?
2. Should I consider the style of controller that
takes input from four thermostats, instead
of reading four actual temperature sensors itself?
3. Should I be looking at X-10 systems? RS485? Can
I get something that plugs into my house's ethernet
and provides a browser-based interface?

Much appreciative of suggestions, observations, and even
illuminating insults.
 
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O

Oscar_Lives

Peter Pearson said:
My Carrier Comfort Zone Center appears to have failed, and
I'm trying to educate myself on replacement options. My
local furnace shop says they don't make these any more and
a replacement controller will cost $2946 if we can use the
existing temperature sensors. That seems like a lot.

Here's the equipment running my 4-zone system, which
really ought to be a 5-zone system but maybe they didn't
make those when this system was installed, apparently
in 1991 (I moved here in 2004):

Carrier Crusade gas furnace
Carrier Comfort Zone Center control box near furnace
Carrier Comfort Zone 4-zone controller/timeclock
Zone dampers: PEI / AirPax

In case anyone cares about the problem motivating this
questions: The "Carrier Comfort Zone Center" is mounted on
studs near the furnace, gets 24 volts AC from the furnace,
and is supposed to supply 10 volts DC to the thermostat,
but instead supplies a voltage varying between 6 and 7
volts with a regular period of about 0.5 second. The
circuit boards in the "Comfort Zone Center" look clean,
and no components are smoking, oozing, or making crackling
noises.

So,
1. Should I pay $2934 to replace this controller?
2. Should I consider the style of controller that
takes input from four thermostats, instead
of reading four actual temperature sensors itself?
3. Should I be looking at X-10 systems? RS485? Can
I get something that plugs into my house's ethernet
and provides a browser-based interface?

Much appreciative of suggestions, observations, and even
illuminating insults.
(e-mail address removed)


How about you post some pics of your wife's tits and with a couple of
60-watt light bulbs shoved up her ass?

Cheap fucking no-it-all homoaner bastard...
 
P

PrecisionMachinisT

Peter Pearson said:
My Carrier Comfort Zone Center appears to have failed, and
I'm trying to educate myself on replacement options. My
local furnace shop says they don't make these any more and
a replacement controller will cost $2946 if we can use the
existing temperature sensors. That seems like a lot.

Here's the equipment running my 4-zone system, which
really ought to be a 5-zone system but maybe they didn't
make those when this system was installed, apparently
in 1991 (I moved here in 2004):

Carrier Crusade gas furnace
Carrier Comfort Zone Center control box near furnace
Carrier Comfort Zone 4-zone controller/timeclock
Zone dampers: PEI / AirPax

In case anyone cares about the problem motivating this
questions: The "Carrier Comfort Zone Center" is mounted on
studs near the furnace, gets 24 volts AC from the furnace,
and is supposed to supply 10 volts DC to the thermostat,
but instead supplies a voltage varying between 6 and 7
volts with a regular period of about 0.5 second. The
circuit boards in the "Comfort Zone Center" look clean,
and no components are smoking, oozing, or making crackling
noises.

So,
1. Should I pay $2934 to replace this controller?
2. Should I consider the style of controller that
takes input from four thermostats, instead
of reading four actual temperature sensors itself?
3. Should I be looking at X-10 systems? RS485? Can
I get something that plugs into my house's ethernet
and provides a browser-based interface?

Much appreciative of suggestions, observations, and even
illuminating insults.
Just operate the dampers manually, you lazy ****.
 
D

DIMwit

There you go Peter! insults complete with illumination. did you really
expect an answer from this group?

Glad I'm not in their trade; I'm already a grouch old bastard without doing
hvac.
this more like the coliseum where the Romans throw the Christians to the
lions for fun. People come her to be insulted or insult others. Very little
(sometimes is though) useful brain power displayed.. Me, being dimwit, have
none at all. ;-)
 
B

Bubba

(e-mail address removed)


How about you post some pics of your wife's tits and with a couple of
60-watt light bulbs shoved up her ass?

Cheap fucking no-it-all homoaner bastard...
Any chance we can illuminate those tits with the bulbs?
I'm sure I can come up with something else to put in the "south end".
Bubba
 
B

Bennett Price

If the only problem is that you don't have 10VDC to the stats, consider
a plug-in-the-wall power supply of the sort used to power CD players,
modems, and the like. Available at Radio Shack.
 
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D

Dido

Jabs said:
Peter,
Before I can help you; What is the model number of your Carrier Comfort
Zone 4-zone controller/timeclock.

Jabs
Yes cost is $500.00 per channel and you do the installation
DIDO
 
P

Peter Pearson

Before I can help you; What is the model number of your Carrier Comfort Zone
4-zone controller/timeclock.
There is an astonishing shortage of anything resembling model
numbers on this equipment, or in the accompanying documentation.
Does any of the following help?

* Molded into the inside of the plastic controller enclosure
face is "Part 140027-02".

* Stamped in ink on the inside of the enclosure is "Nov 18 1992".

* A paper sticker on what appears to be a socketed EPROM says
"CZCT Rev 1.3".

* A paper sticker on what appears to be the board's processor
chip says "306DAR0415".
 
P

Peter Pearson

My Carrier Comfort Zone Center appears to have failed, [snip]
. . . The "Carrier Comfort Zone Center" is mounted on
studs near the furnace, gets 24 volts AC from the furnace,
and is supposed to supply 10 volts DC to the thermostat,
but instead supplies a voltage varying between 6 and 7
volts with a regular period of about 0.5 second. The
circuit boards in the "Comfort Zone Center" look clean,
and no components are smoking, oozing, or making crackling
noises.
The answer:

Gazing dumbly at the controller board wondering why it
couldn't deliver a simple +10 to the thermostat, I noticed
that the +10 out was switched by a transistor whose base was
driven by a bunch of logic. This led to the theory that the
controller was purposely power-cycling the thermostat
waiting for some kind of power-up message. (The voltage
appeared to be switching between about 6 and 7 volts, not 0
to 10, but that might just be the inertia of my meter's
needle.) An ohmmeter check revealed that one of the 8
solid-core wires in the cable between the controller and the
thermostat was -- somehow invisibly -- broken. Replacing
that one wire restored normal behavior.

Thanks to Bennett, Jabs, and Dido for their helpful
attitudes, and to Oscar_Lives and his family for ensuring
that wiring instructions will always be printed in
block capitals and short words.
 
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A

ashuWEMBA

ppearson wrote:

My Carrier Comfort Zone Center appears to have failed, [snip]
. . . The "Carrier Comfort Zone Center" is mounted on
studs near the furnace, gets 24 volts AC from the furnace,
and is supposed to supply 10 volts DC to the thermostat,
but instead supplies a voltage varying between 6 and 7
volts with a regular period of about 0.5 second. The
circuit boards in the "Comfort Zone Center" look clean,
and no components are smoking, oozing, or making crackling
noises.
The answer:
Gazing dumbly at the controller board wondering why it
couldn't deliver a simple +10 to the thermostat, I noticed
that the +10 out was switched by a transistor whose base was
driven by a bunch of logic. This led to the theory that the
controller was purposely power-cycling the thermostat
waiting for some kind of power-up message. (The voltage
appeared to be switching between about 6 and 7 volts, not 0
to 10, but that might just be the inertia of my meter's
needle.) An ohmmeter check revealed that one of the 8
solid-core wires in the cable between the controller and the
thermostat was -- somehow invisibly -- broken. Replacing
that one wire restored normal behavior.
Thanks to Bennett, Jabs, and Dido for their helpful
attitudes, and to Oscar_Lives and his family for ensuring
that wiring instructions will always be printed in
block capitals and short words.

Hello Peter,

I am having a similar problem ... Every so often I hear a rapid switching
on/off from where the fan/blower is located. It seems that if I tap the
main termostat (zone 1), main the Comfort Zone controller the noise stops.
I was also told that this model is not made any more and the replacement
would be about 3K.

If I read your response ... there are two cables coming in - one with
three wires and another 5 wires ... I am curious to know
1. How did you detect or find out which wire was broken?
2. Did you rerun the entire cable (that has multiple wires)?

Thanks
Ashu
 

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