Removing old water tank from loft


B

Broadback

I don't have and angle grinder.
As it is very awkward to get up there, I am not absolutely certain that
it is metal, though it looks like it. The hatch is far too small to get
it through, any suggestions for a reasonable approach, I do not wish to
spend a lot of money on a cutting tool that I may never use again. Is it
viable to hacksaw it, or will it be too thick?
 
Ad

Advertisements

M

Man at B&Q

I don't have and angle grinder.
As it is very awkward to get up there, I am not absolutely certain that
it is metal, though it looks like it. The hatch is far too small to get
it through, any suggestions for a reasonable approach, I do not wish to
spend a lot of money on a cutting tool that I may never use again. Is it
viable to hacksaw it, or will it be too thick?
Move it to one side and leave it there.

MBQ
 
H

Huge

I don't have and angle grinder.
As it is very awkward to get up there, I am not absolutely certain that
it is metal, though it looks like it. The hatch is far too small to get
it through, any suggestions for a reasonable approach, I do not wish to
spend a lot of money on a cutting tool that I may never use again. Is it
viable to hacksaw it, or will it be too thick?
Just leave it up there, if there's room.
 
M

Martin Brown

I don't have and angle grinder.
As it is very awkward to get up there, I am not absolutely certain that
it is metal, though it looks like it. The hatch is far too small to get
it through, any suggestions for a reasonable approach, I do not wish to
spend a lot of money on a cutting tool that I may never use again. Is it
viable to hacksaw it, or will it be too thick?
Why bother to remove it at all?

If you must. I'd be inclined to attack it with a pretty basic cheap and
nasty jigsaw half expecting to burn it out. There is a redundant metal
water tank in a loft not far away. I am in no hurry to remove it!
 
D

Davey

I don't have and angle grinder.
As it is very awkward to get up there, I am not absolutely certain
that it is metal, though it looks like it. The hatch is far too small
to get it through, any suggestions for a reasonable approach, I do
not wish to spend a lot of money on a cutting tool that I may never
use again. Is it viable to hacksaw it, or will it be too thick?
If you must remove it, it is possible to rent tools.
 
P

polygonum

I don't have and angle grinder.
As it is very awkward to get up there, I am not absolutely certain that
it is metal, though it looks like it. The hatch is far too small to get
it through, any suggestions for a reasonable approach, I do not wish to
spend a lot of money on a cutting tool that I may never use again. Is it
viable to hacksaw it, or will it be too thick?
I was lucky - we had a squared tank that was on a platform immediately
below the loft. Upon removal it was already in the room below - but
horrible to get down the stairs and out. Far heavier than I had
expected. Mostly very sound but getting close to rusting through in a
few spots.

Had thought of hiring a nibbler of some sort - but no experience so
still don't know if that would have bee the right tool.
 
Ad

Advertisements

M

Martin Bonner

If you must remove it, it is possible to rent tools.
That sounds like a very sensible idea. I'd go for a nibbler rather than
an angle grinder - less noise, and fewer sparks to set fire to dust and
rafters.

HSS will hire you one that will cut through 2.5mm mild steel for less
than £50.
 
B

Bill Wright

Broadback said:
I don't have and angle grinder.
As it is very awkward to get up there, I am not absolutely certain that
it is metal, though it looks like it. The hatch is far too small to get
it through, any suggestions for a reasonable approach, I do not wish to
spend a lot of money on a cutting tool that I may never use again. Is it
viable to hacksaw it, or will it be too thick?
Leave it where it is, or hire an angle grinder with a very thin wheel.

Bill
 
A

Andy Dingley

I don't have and angle grinder.
Then buy one anyway, even though I wouldn't use it for this job.

Angle grinders throw sparks and sparks are a bad thing in roof spaces. Check for at least 12 hours afterwards that you don't have a smouldering fire.
Is it viable to hacksaw it, or will it be too thick?
A hacksaw will bind on the frame and panel hacksaws are hard/expensive to find.

It's probably best to buy a cheap / hire a low-end reciprocating saw. Not a jigsaw, but a larger "sabre" saw. Use the right blade too, and you might need a couple of blades.

If you have a compressor, an air chisel with a panel ripping blade is actually the best tool for this. Quieter and quicker than sawing. Much quicker than nibbling.

You _will_ need ear defenders. Eye protection too, and dust mask if there's insulation around.

It's also useful to drape old blankets (or anything similar) over all four sides to stop the drumming effect.
 
Ad

Advertisements

B

Broadback

Then buy one anyway, even though I wouldn't use it for this job.

Angle grinders throw sparks and sparks are a bad thing in roof spaces. Check for at least 12 hours afterwards that you don't have a smouldering fire.


A hacksaw will bind on the frame and panel hacksaws are hard/expensive to find.

It's probably best to buy a cheap / hire a low-end reciprocating saw. Not a jigsaw, but a larger "sabre" saw. Use the right blade too, and you might need a couple of blades.

If you have a compressor, an air chisel with a panel ripping blade is actually the best tool for this. Quieter and quicker than sawing. Much quicker than nibbling.

You _will_ need ear defenders. Eye protection too, and dust mask if there's insulation around.

It's also useful to drape old blankets (or anything similar) over all four sides to stop the drumming effect.
Thanks for all the tips. The only reason I need to move it is that the
loft is being insulated (for free) and they specify that it must be cleared!
 
D

Dave Liquorice

That sounds like a very sensible idea. I'd go for a nibbler rather
than an angle grinder - less noise, and fewer sparks to set fire to
dust and rafters.
Very wise.
HSS will hire you one that will cut through 2.5mm mild steel for less
than £50.
2.5mm might not be big enough. Think I'd go for a sabre saw with a metal
cutting blade.
 
T

tony sayer

Andy said:
Then buy one anyway, even though I wouldn't use it for this job.

Angle grinders throw sparks and sparks are a bad thing in roof spaces. Check for
at least 12 hours afterwards that you don't have a smouldering fire.


A hacksaw will bind on the frame and panel hacksaws are hard/expensive to find.

It's probably best to buy a cheap / hire a low-end reciprocating saw. Not a
jigsaw, but a larger "sabre" saw. Use the right blade too, and you might need a
couple of blades.
Homebase do one for around 50 quid or prolly less now. Works very well
the few times I've use it on various metals inc Steel sheet...
 
P

pcb1962

When I tried to sell my last house, one of the buyers surveyors
complained about the water tank, so I changed it.

When I cut the old one in half, I convinced myself that there was not
much wrong with it.
A jacket and a lid would probably have been enough to fool most
surveyors into thinking it was Byelaw 30 compliant. IME they do little
more than stick their head through the hatch and have a quick look
around to check things like that.
 
R

Robin

If you must remove it, it is possible to rent tools.
or even hire them
I thought "rent" swung both ways. OED thinks it does. "3. trans. To pay
rent for (land, buildings, etc.); to take possession of, hold, occupy,
or use, by payment of rent. "
 
Ad

Advertisements

S

ss

The only reason I need to move it is that the loft is being insulated
(for free) and they specify that it must be cleared!
I had mine done and the same request however they did allow me to leave
a section floored and the insulation put over the floored area. I doubt
if they would refuse to insulate if you keep the tank up there, you can
always phone and ask them.
 
T

The Natural Philosopher

I don't have and angle grinder.
As it is very awkward to get up there, I am not absolutely certain that
it is metal, though it looks like it. The hatch is far too small to get
it through, any suggestions for a reasonable approach, I do not wish to
spend a lot of money on a cutting tool that I may never use again. Is it
viable to hacksaw it, or will it be too thick?

dont faff about: HIRE the tool you need. Id say a fiver should net you a
grinder for a day...

Oh te magic when I hired a grinder and diamond wheel to cut three
sandstone slabs to finish the curved bit. Took less than ten minutes an
40 mins later I took it back to the hire shop. 'didn't it work?' 'worked
perfectly: Job done! all present and correct' 'Oh that's a fiver for the
grinder and ten is the min charge on the diamond disc I am afraid' 'No
worries'

Id wrecked 20 quids worth of stone trying to do it with a chisel..



--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the
members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are
rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
diminishing number of producers.
 
T

Tim+

Martin Bonner said:
That sounds like a very sensible idea. I'd go for a nibbler rather than
an angle grinder - less noise, and fewer sparks to set fire to dust and
rafters.

HSS will hire you one that will cut through 2.5mm mild steel for less
than £50.
Plasma cutter. Gwaan, you know you want to play with one. ;-)

Tim
 
Ad

Advertisements

C

charles

I thought "rent" swung both ways. OED thinks it does. "3. trans. To pay
rent for (land, buildings, etc.); to take possession of, hold, occupy,
or use, by payment of rent. "
I don't consider tools to be "Land, Buildings, etc"
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top