Preventing rot to swing seat


L

larkim

We've bought a shiny new swinging seat for the back garden to replace the previous one which rotted away in the end.

It is sat upon flags and will be outdoors most of the year (we may bring it in over winter, depends how much space there is in the garage!!)

I'd ideally like to protect the feet somehow from sitting in water. The flags will drain properly, but I was wondering whether sticking some brass bolts into the underside of the feet to raise it up slightly would have any descernible benefit?

Or any alternatives?

Ideas gratefully received!

Matt
 
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I

Ian Jackson

In message
We've bought a shiny new swinging seat for the back garden to replace
the previous one which rotted away in the end.

It is sat upon flags and will be outdoors most of the year (we may
bring it in over winter, depends how much space there is in the
garage!!)

I'd ideally like to protect the feet somehow from sitting in water.
The flags will drain properly, but I was wondering whether sticking
some brass bolts into the underside of the feet to raise it up slightly
would have any descernible benefit?

Or any alternatives?

Ideas gratefully received!
At least once per year (preferably more), when dry, stand each of the
feet in a large-ish jamjar (or other suitable container), then add clear
wood preservative to jamjar. Leave for several hours. This certainly
works with wooden garden seats.
 
L

larkim

In message

At least once per year (preferably more), when dry, stand each of the
feet in a large-ish jamjar (or other suitable container), then add clear
wood preservative to jamjar. Leave for several hours. This certainly
works with wooden garden seats.
Sounds like an excellent suggestion, thanks. Any particular brand that you'd recommend?

Matt
 
N

NT

Sounds like an excellent suggestion, thanks.  Any particular brand thatyou'd recommend?

Matt
Creosote. Nothing else comes close. But it pongs for a bit, and you
cant buy it retail now.


NT
 
I

Ian Jackson

In message
The last can I got was from Wickes. It was surprising expensive - £24
for 5 litres. It was never cheap, but I think B&Q and Homebase have it
for a bit less than that.
Creosote. Nothing else comes close. But it pongs for a bit
Indeed it does. A couple weeks ago, I needed to slosh a bit of
preservative on a bit of repaired fencing, so I raided my stash of my
last-time buy of the 'real thing' (which I've been hoarding for many
years). It's still ponging well!

The advantage of the clear stuff is that it has a relatively inoffensive
smell, which is completely gone after a day or two. In most cases, there
is absolutely no discoloration of the wood.
, and you
cant buy it retail now.
So recommending it is hardly the best advice!
 
N

NT

In message


The last can I got was from Wickes. It was surprising expensive - £24
for 5 litres. It was never cheap, but I think B&Q and Homebase have it
for a bit less than that.




Indeed it does. A couple weeks ago, I needed to slosh a bit of
preservative on a bit of repaired fencing, so I raided my stash of my
last-time buy of the 'real thing' (which I've been hoarding for many
years). It's still ponging well!

The advantage of the clear stuff is that it has a relatively inoffensive
smell, which is completely gone after a day or two. In most cases, there
is absolutely no discoloration of the wood.


So recommending it is hardly the best advice!
Certainly is, the retail ones just arent very effective now. If you or
a mate is in any kind of trade that may have a reason to buy some, you
can get it from farmer's suppliers.


NT
 
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Ian Jackson

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NT said:
Certainly is, the retail ones just arent very effective now. If you or
a mate is in any kind of trade that may have a reason to buy some, you
can get it from farmer's suppliers.
While there's no doubt that creosote is much more effective and
long-lasting than the modern namby-pamby EC-approved alternatives (for
domestic use), it's not really the stuff to use on garden furniture. It
smells and it stains.

The clear preservative is pretty good, provided you repeat the dose from
time to time. With something like a garden seat, it's only a few minutes
work to stand the legs in jamjar-sized containers containing clear
preservative, and allow it to soak up the grain. [Or, if you want, you
can do one leg at a time.] When done, remove the jars, and pour the
remaining liquid back in the can. As the preservative is 'clean', it
won't permanently mark paving stones etc - and you don't need to have a
'mate in the trade' to get it.
 
N

NT

In message



While there's no doubt that creosote is much more effective and
long-lasting than the modern namby-pamby EC-approved alternatives (for
domestic use), it's not really the stuff to use on garden furniture. It
smells and it stains.
For a short time, yes. Creosoted goods often need to be left unused
for a bit.

The clear preservative is pretty good, provided you repeat the dose from
time to time. With something like a garden seat, it's only a few minutes
work to stand the legs in jamjar-sized containers containing clear
preservative, and allow it to soak up the grain. [Or, if you want, you
can do one leg at a time.] When done, remove the jars, and pour the
remaining liquid back in the can. As the preservative is 'clean', it
won't permanently mark paving stones etc - and you don't need to have a
'mate in the trade' to get it.
A lot of us on here are in a relevant trade.


NT
 
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L

larkim

In message
















While there's no doubt that creosote is much more effective and
long-lasting than the modern namby-pamby EC-approved alternatives (for
domestic use), it's not really the stuff to use on garden furniture. It
smells and it stains.
For a short time, yes. Creosoted goods often need to be left unused
for a bit.

The clear preservative is pretty good, provided you repeat the dose from
time to time. With something like a garden seat, it's only a few minutes
work to stand the legs in jamjar-sized containers containing clear
preservative, and allow it to soak up the grain. [Or, if you want, you
can do one leg at a time.] When done, remove the jars, and pour the
remaining liquid back in the can. As the preservative is 'clean', it
won't permanently mark paving stones etc - and you don't need to have a
'mate in the trade' to get it.
A lot of us on here are in a relevant trade.


NT
But I'm not (and that's one of the reasons why I asked the question here). In addition, this is a decorative item of garden furniture which has already been stained / treated, but which I want to last.

Non-discolouring clear treatment seems like a great solution, and if I haveto go through the minor hassle of re-treating it at the beginning and end of the summer to maintain protection, that seems a very sensible solution.

I'd get shot by SWMBO if the feet of her new swing seat ended up stained dark brown and stank of creosote (no matter how effective it is as a weather seal).

Cheers!

Matt
 

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