Poison Ivy Removal?


B

Bruce K.

We have poison ivy growing behind a wooden fence.
Every once in a while the vine squeezes under or through the wooden
slats.
I can spray over the fence with a hose sprayer but would like to know
what to use.

Thanks for your help.

Bruce
 
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M

m Ransley

Use Roundup then leave it alone, remember poison ivy even dead can
remain active for over a year.
 
B

berkshire bill

Bruce K. said:
We have poison ivy growing behind a wooden fence.
Every once in a while the vine squeezes under or through the wooden
slats.
I can spray over the fence with a hose sprayer but would like to know
what to use.

Thanks for your help.

Bruce
Check http://www.ortho.com they have several solutions. IMHO Weed B Gone
would probably do it.



Bill
 
P

Phisherman

We have poison ivy growing behind a wooden fence.
Every once in a while the vine squeezes under or through the wooden
slats.
I can spray over the fence with a hose sprayer but would like to know
what to use.

Thanks for your help.

Bruce
I just finished "poison ivy hunting" on my property. I use the
RoundUp concentrate, but I add an extra tablespoon to a quart of water
in a spray bottle. When used as directed, it just is not powerful
enough. An established plant will probably need a second spraying
after a few weeks.
 
D

Doug Miller

We have poison ivy growing behind a wooden fence.
Every once in a while the vine squeezes under or through the wooden
slats.
I can spray over the fence with a hose sprayer but would like to know
what to use.
Ortho Weed-B-Gone is very effective on poison ivy: rapid and thorough kill.
Don't waste your money buying Ortho Poison Ivy - Poison Oak Killer. It's
*exactly* the same stuff as Weed-B-Gone, but higher priced.
 
C

Chris Lewis

According to Phisherman said:
I just finished "poison ivy hunting" on my property. I use the
RoundUp concentrate, but I add an extra tablespoon to a quart of water
in a spray bottle. When used as directed, it just is not powerful
enough. An established plant will probably need a second spraying
after a few weeks.
Tip from a professional botanist (not me):

When making up the Roundup (tech name "Glysophate") solution, make it
a bit stronger than the directions (note that there are a number of
different strengths given on most labels. You don't need the strongest).

Then add a bit of liquid dish soap. Like, a teaspoon to a quart of
solution.

The active ingredient in poison ivy is an oil called "Urushiol".

Water based herbicides will bead up and run off like it would on
any other "oily" object. Adding a bit of liquid dish soap helps
the herbicide penetrate thru the oil and get to the plant.

We're generally achieving a kill with only one application (as long
as the weather cooperates).

When dealing with difficult infestations (eg: poison ivy amongst
desirable plants), the trick is to apply it directly without spraying.
The easy way to do this is to wear a pair of cotton gloves over
decent rubber gloves. Dip your fingers in the solution, and basically
lightly grab the exposed portion of the plant and pull, letting the
cotton gloves douse the plant. But not touch anything nearby.

Roundup is neat that it immediately inerts itself on contact with the
dirt. So as long as you don't get the stuff on desirable plants
above ground level, it won't transfer underground.

Supposedly Roundup has been tested more than virtually any other
pest/herbicide, and the active ingredient is rated non-toxic
to anything _but_ plants. Theoretically, you can drink the stuff
with no ill effects. But, needless to say, I don't feel the urge
to test that ;-)
 
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R

raven

Bruce K. said:
We have poison ivy growing behind a wooden fence.
Every once in a while the vine squeezes under or through the wooden
slats.
I can spray over the fence with a hose sprayer but would like to know
what to use.
Interesting that everyone is recomending the chemical spray route. The
articles I've read (and a bit of personal experience) indicate that it's a
waste of time, since the thing with poison ivy is that it's got creeping
roots. Round up doesn't do so well in the ground, so the poison ivy
quickly comes back.

The thing we do is wait untill after (or preferably during) a rain storm,
which washes the worst of the oils off the plant. Weaing full coverage
clothing, With disposable gloves, and small kitchen garbabge bags over the
gloves, pull up the poison ivy. You'll be amazed how far the roots travel
as you start pulling. Just keep pulling gently to get the most of the
root as possible (the rain soften soil helps this) and that small patch
you found may well be very much larger than you thought. Bag everything
up, Tie it up, then peel off the gloves and rebag everything once more.

Then march straight to the washing machine: strip and put everything into
the machine, then go straight to shower and wash with a poison ivy
specific soap. (There are prewashes you apply to your skin if you expect
to get into poison ivy, use those if you can fine 'em.) It works well,
and the reoccourance rate is much better than with any spray.

If you've got an area that's infested with the stuff, I've heard of folks
using sheep to do the clearing. The sheep will hapilly eat poison Ivy up,
roots and all down to bare earth, but the person who tried this warns that
sheep are cute, and the kids may not be mindfull that the sheep has been
wading in poison ivy before the hug and pet the animal. :)



John
 
H

Harry K

Interesting that everyone is recomending the chemical spray route. The
articles I've read (and a bit of personal experience) indicate that it's a
waste of time, since the thing with poison ivy is that it's got creeping
roots. Round up doesn't do so well in the ground, so the poison ivy
quickly comes back.
Strange. Round-up works because it gets into and kills the -root-,
not the top growth. The top growth then dies due to lack of food, not
the chemical. That is why it takes a week to 10 days to show results.
At least that is what used to happen before they started including
other stuff so the top would show results quicker. Too many people
would spray then a few days later think round-up was no good because
the weed still looked healthy.

Harry K
 
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K

Ken

Absolutely, I've never used Glyphosate (roundup) on poison ivy however in
my line of work I do purchase Glypohosate in 30 gal drums. Roundup is
systemic and does migrate to the roots. If you want some extra punch lace
it with weed-b-gone or any 2-4d product. (That is legal). Also add some
dishsoap or other adjuvant
 

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