Plane advice requested (manual or powered etc)


S

Seri

I need to hang some doors, not many, just three of them. So I need to
purchase a plane to get the job done.
I've checked on 'toolstation' and a manual 'block plane' is around £30
Also on 'toolstation' I can get a cheap as chips, unbranded SL155 Power
Planer for £22.50
Lastly, I can get a Ryobi L175 Planer for £50

Now, this item probably won't be getting that much use, but I don't relish
he thought of having to scrap a whole door because I bodged it (I know a bad
work man blames his tools, but they do make a difference).

Is there any point whatsoever getting the unbranded cheap-as planer?
Is there an real advantage in using a power planer over a manual plane?

Keep in mind that I haven't used a plane since I was about 15 years old
trying to make a sledge.

Thanks for any and all advice.

Seri
 
T

T i m

I need to hang some doors, not many, just three of them. So I need to
purchase a plane to get the job done.
I've checked on 'toolstation' and a manual 'block plane' is around +AKM-30
Also on 'toolstation' I can get a cheap as chips, unbranded SL155 Power
Planer for +AKM-22.50
Lastly, I can get a Ryobi L175 Planer for +AKM-50

Now, this item probably won't be getting that much use, but I don't relish
he thought of having to scrap a whole door because I bodged it (I know a bad
work man blames his tools, but they do make a difference).

Is there any point whatsoever getting the unbranded cheap-as planer?
Is there an real advantage in using a power planer over a manual plane?

Keep in mind that I haven't used a plane since I was about 15 years old
trying to make a sledge.

Thanks for any and all advice.
[T] I would think after my heavy wire brush / angle grinder setup, my
Matika power plane is the other tool that I am VERY respectful of.

As long as the door is held very steady, a power plane may be easier
to keep square etc?

Just count your fingers before you start and check again at the end
;-(

All the best ..

T i m
 
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B

Ben Schofield

Seri said:
I need to hang some doors, not many, just three of them. So I need to
purchase a plane to get the job done.
I've checked on 'toolstation' and a manual 'block plane' is around £30
Also on 'toolstation' I can get a cheap as chips, unbranded SL155 Power
Planer for £22.50
Lastly, I can get a Ryobi L175 Planer for £50
I bought an Aldi £15 power plane a while ago; it works just fine. I
suspect the unbranded one is made to the same design.

It's more important to have a couple of sharp blades (the ones that came
with the planer are OK, or Screwfix sell TCT ones), and to spend some
time settings things up so that the blades, body of the plane and
adjustable front are all *exactly* parallel. I did this by holding the
planer upside down, facing a bright window, and looking down the bottom.

Starting and finishing the cut are the most difficult bits, because only
one of the front or back metal plates is touching the workpiece.
Practice on some scrap wood first, you'll soon get the hang of it.

Don't ever fiddle with the blades without making sure it's unplugged and
always remember that the bottom is spinning even after you've stopped,
or you'll end up gouging your floor/going to casualty!

Ben.
 
N

Nick Brooks

Seri said:
I need to hang some doors, not many, just three of them. So I need to
purchase a plane to get the job done.
I've checked on 'toolstation' and a manual 'block plane' is around £30
Also on 'toolstation' I can get a cheap as chips, unbranded SL155 Power
Planer for £22.50
Lastly, I can get a Ryobi L175 Planer for £50

Now, this item probably won't be getting that much use, but I don't relish
he thought of having to scrap a whole door because I bodged it (I know a bad
work man blames his tools, but they do make a difference).

Is there any point whatsoever getting the unbranded cheap-as planer?
Is there an real advantage in using a power planer over a manual plane?

Keep in mind that I haven't used a plane since I was about 15 years old
trying to make a sledge.

Thanks for any and all advice.

Seri
Things can go wrong very quickly with a power plane and if you're not in
a hurry you may find the old fashioned sort easier to handle. Problems
can occure when you try to plane across the grain where a tongue sticks
through the edge of the door (usually on old doors only)

Also power planes can leave round dips if you don't plane the length of
the door in one go especially at the start and end of a run.

Nick
 
G

Grouch

Seri said:
I need to hang some doors, not many, just three of them. So I need to
purchase a plane to get the job done.
I've checked on 'toolstation' and a manual 'block plane' is around £30
Also on 'toolstation' I can get a cheap as chips, unbranded SL155 Power
Planer for £22.50
Lastly, I can get a Ryobi L175 Planer for £50

Now, this item probably won't be getting that much use, but I don't relish
he thought of having to scrap a whole door because I bodged it (I know a bad
work man blames his tools, but they do make a difference).

Is there any point whatsoever getting the unbranded cheap-as planer?
Is there an real advantage in using a power planer over a manual plane?

Keep in mind that I haven't used a plane since I was about 15 years old
trying to make a sledge.

Thanks for any and all advice.

Seri
============================================
personally myself I bought a Manual plane , don't like them elecy gizmos as
one poster pointed out you have to watch the start and the end, also if stop
anywhere along the length of the wood you will find a nice shallow hollow
where the plane stopped. :eek:(
I Have a router which I use on doors now but it's too complicated to explain
in words how it's done.

Grouch
 
D

Dave Plowman

[T] I would think after my heavy wire brush / angle grinder setup, my
Matika power plane is the other tool that I am VERY respectful of.
Strange. I'm not in the least scared of mine - although respectful of it
as with all power tools. Circular saws and routers scare me more, as well
as angle grinders.
 
D

Dave Plowman

Things can go wrong very quickly with a power plane
All the ones I've seen have got adjustable cutting depth. So start off
slowly and check after every cut - same as with anything.
 
T

T i m

[T] I would think after my heavy wire brush / angle grinder setup, my
Matika power plane is the other tool that I am VERY respectful of.
Strange. I'm not in the least scared of mine - although respectful of it
as with all power tools.
[T] Well indeed Dave ... it's just that some power tools sound / feel
more scary than others!

Circular saws and routers scare me more, as well
as angle grinders.
[T] My angle grinder / coarse wire brush has caught me twice (I think
I need to get it exorcised!). There I was, cleaning up a hydraulic
motorcycle lift with the brush grinder and wearing ear defenders,
goggles, gloves, leather apron, cap etc when the brush caught the
floor and did a 0-60 onto my leg. It would have just been my jeans had
they not had a small tear on the knee. All my jeans covered leg and it
finds the one hole .. <sigh> . I'm not exactly sure how many layers of
skin we have but I do know all of them went in about .002 of a second
.... <ouch> .. ;-(

Planers. I think thay have taken more fingers in timber yards than any
circular saw?

All the best and work safe .. ;-)

T i m

I think any power tool with a switch that locks (router, grinder,
planer etc) needs special attention .. !
 
D

Dave Plowman

Manual planes are all but impossible for the uninitiated. I bought a
cheap as chips power plane for door sizing and it is absolutely
fantastic. The manual plane never gets used. The electric is really easy
to use, provided you work out a technique for finishing at the end.
Yes. I'd say it's no more difficult to make a half decent job of with than
a hand plane - both need skill. The difference is the electric one can
take off more in one go.
 
P

PoP

Manual planes are all but impossible for the uninitiated. I bought a cheap
I carry around a small plane which has a blade about 1.25in across
which can be (and in fact must be) used single handed. It gets used
regularly to shave tight doors and windows.

The power plane comes out only very rarely, when I know I've got to
remove lots of material.

PoP

-----

My published email address probably won't work. If
you need to contact me please submit your comments
via the web form at http://www.anyoldtripe.co.uk

I apologise for the additional effort, however the
level of unsolicited email I receive makes it
impossible to advertise my real email address!
 
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N

N. Thornton

Seri said:
I need to hang some doors, not many, just three of them. So I need to
purchase a plane to get the job done.
I've checked on 'toolstation' and a manual 'block plane' is around £30
Also on 'toolstation' I can get a cheap as chips, unbranded SL155 Power
Planer for £22.50
Lastly, I can get a Ryobi L175 Planer for £50

Hi Seri.

I've found a power planer gives a much faster easier and better
quality finish. But they have pitfalls to be aware of:

1. Its important to buy one that uses disposable TCT blades. Some of
the absolute bottom end ones use carbon steel blades that blunt
rapidly and need setting up/aligning, which is a pain. Anything even
vaguely decent uses replaceable TCT blades that dont need alignment.

2. Half a second of inattention is all it takes to remove a fair lump
of wood, or even a finger, so always pay total attention. Youve got 2
blades doing 10,000 rpm, so it'll eat everything it touches for
breakfast. And it takes time for the blades to stop.

3. Always run the plane end to end: everyone tries planing just part
of it and getting it to line up, but it doesnt work that way.

4. Theres a technique to avoid taking lumps out at each end.
a) when going onto the wood put all the downforce onto the front of
the plane only. Get the front sitting level on the wood, then proceed.
At the end of the wood all the downforce should be on the back end
only.
b) For anyone who finds that awkward, clamp bits of scrap on each end
and you're worry free.

No way would I go back to a hand plane. Once youve got the basic
technique a power plane is so fast its almost a weapon of mass
destruction.

5. Screwfix's Ferm plane is good, and about £25 IIRC.


Regards, NT
 
S

Seri

N. Thornton said:
"Seri" <salnajjar@hotmail.com> wrote in message
No way would I go back to a hand plane. Once youve got the basic
technique a power plane is so fast its almost a weapon of mass
destruction.

5. Screwfix's Ferm plane is good, and about £25 IIRC.


Regards, NT
Thanks for all the advice from everyone.
My ScrewFix basket now contains:
1 x FERM FP82 PLANER
2 x PLANER BLADE 82MM PR

I'll post a quick update when I use it too let you know if I still have all
my fingers and whether I've had to buy a new door :eek:)

Thanks once again for the help... much appreciated

Seri
 
H

Huge

Seri said:
Thanks for all the advice from everyone.
My ScrewFix basket now contains:
1 x FERM FP82 PLANER
2 x PLANER BLADE 82MM PR

I'll post a quick update when I use it too let you know if I still have all
my fingers and whether I've had to buy a new door :eek:)
Do be careful. My dining room door now no longer sticks, but it doesn't
fit in the frame any more, either. :eek:(
 
N

N. Thornton

Seri said:
"N. Thornton" <bigcat@meeow.co.uk> wrote in message
Thanks for all the advice from everyone.
My ScrewFix basket now contains:
1 x FERM FP82 PLANER
2 x PLANER BLADE 82MM PR

I'll post a quick update when I use it too let you know if I still have all
my fingers and whether I've had to buy a new door :eek:)

Thanks once again for the help... much appreciated

Seri

How you going to type with no fingers? :) I guess we have to be resourceful.

Regards, NT
 
Z

Zymurgy

Dave Plowman wrote ,
Yes. I'd say it's no more difficult to make a half decent job of with than
a hand plane - both need skill. The difference is the electric one can
take off more in one go.
Difficulty is over the end grain with a manual plane.

The sides are easy.

Personally I belt sands the ends and plane the sides.

No power planer required, and arguably the belt sander is more versatile.

Cheers,

Paul.
 
M

MarkM

Seri said:
Thanks for all the advice from everyone.
My ScrewFix basket now contains:
1 x FERM FP82 PLANER
2 x PLANER BLADE 82MM PR

I'll post a quick update when I use it too let you know if I still have all
my fingers and whether I've had to buy a new door :eek:)

Thanks once again for the help... much appreciated

Seri
Now that you've ordered the power planer it's time to check that
you've got a cheapo metal detector. Doors usually have nails or
staples cunningly hidden just under the surface, and these will take
chunks out of the planer blade. Check regularly with the detector, and
either punch them lower out of harms way, or remove them....
 
S

Seri

Darn it, we left my daughters metal detector in Scotland with my folks,
figured the thing was useless (I think we were more dissapointed than my
daughter).
 
M

Meoww

snip

No way would I go back to a hand plane. Once youve got the basic
technique a power plane is so fast its almost a weapon of mass
destruction. snip

Regards, NT
Forgive me, but don't you mean a weapon of mass CONstruction?

I'll get me coat :)

Patrick
 
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