pheromones pumped in the air handlers of stores?


I

IDUNO YOUTURD

Hey guys this article is in todays paper .
was wondering what you guys think of this,,
is it real? and possible?? read the copy paste below============copy
paste begin

GALVESTON COUNTY DAILY NEWS
Texas' Oldest Newspaper
http://galvestondailynews.com
Company claims pheromones boost retail sales

Published February 15, 2004
Your favorite department store might seem a little friendlier, you might
shop a little longer and you might feel so serene that you plunk down
the cash for an extra pair of shoes.
That's the scenario a Vancouver, B.C., company is peddling to retailers.
Enhanced Air Technologies claims their proprietary synthetic human
pheromone compound — pumped through a store's ventilation system —
makes shoppers feel more at ease.
Enhanced Air's Director of Development Nigel Malkin said the company's
product, Commercaire, makes consumers feel comfortable and secure so
they shop longer and spend more.
Ethicists at the University of Texas Medical Branch and the University
of Houston — Clear Lake said the practice is offensive if consumers
aren't told the system is in use, and one of the country's leading
experts in pheromone research questioned the validity of the company's
scientific claims.
But Enhanced Air promises big sales boosts and spiking customer loyalty.
"The compound doesn't cause consumers to get into a spending frenzy so
much as it causes them to feel more at ease in an environment and more
receptive to sales messages," said Malkin.
Ethics Questioned
Bill Winslade, a University of Texas Medical Branch ethicist who is also
a lawyer, said using such a system without notifying shoppers would be
deplorable.
"I would certainly be strongly opposed to the use of substances of that
sort surreptitiously because to use something to try to affect the
thoughts and feelings of consumers without their knowledge is clearly
unethical if not illegal," Winslade said. "I would think they should be
required to post a highly visible notice that they were doing something
like that."
Neither state nor federal laws currently regulate the practice.
University of Houston — Clear Lake philosophy professor Paul Wagner,
who is the school's director of the Project in Professional Ethics,
agreed that consumers should be warned.
"If you did it without me knowing, you're kind of a scoundrel," said
Wagner. "You're sneaking up on me, you're ambushing me."
Winslade said that as a marketing tool it's vastly different than
advertising. "At least you're exposed to ads directly," he said.
"There's something more sinister about something that's released into
the air that you can't see or smell or know it's there."
The ethical line is less clear if consumers know that a store is pumping
something through the air system that affects mood or behavior. Winslade
said no one would take issue with a store offering free coffee and
doughnuts to make their customers feel more at ease, but that scenario
offers consumers a choice. "That's an open behavior," said Winslade.
"This seems so sneaky."
Wagner said stores could potentially turn notification to their
advantage by advertising the practice, telling shoppers the system was
in use for their comfort and enjoyment — but again, it's a matter of
notice.
"At least you've had an opportunity to decide," Wagner said. "Is there
something patently wrong with piping these things through the
ventilation system? Not necessarily."
Wagner said that doing so without notice to shoppers, though, was
predatory.
Business Boon
Malkin said the compound was developed for a Las Vegas casino to keep
gamblers in a better mood.
"We're now seeing huge demand from other sectors, especially in the
retail and restaurant industries," said Malkin. "Our clients are
reporting increases in their bottom lines across the board."
According to the company's marketing materials, an unnamed chain of
retail stores tested the synthetic phero-mone compound in half of its
stores. The company stores using the system saw a 14-percent sales
increase compared to the same quarter one year earlier. Enhanced Air
says the stores that weren't equipped with the system saw a dip in sales
of more than 5 percent, which the retailer chalked up to a sluggish
economy.
Citing a confidentiality policy, the company would not disclose the
names of any of its customers.
Casino Expert Skeptical
University of Nevada — Las Vegas professor David Schwartz is head of
the school's Gaming Studies Research Center and the author of "Suburban
Xanadu: The Casino Resort on the Las Vegas Strip and Beyond." Schwartz
said he knew of no casinos that pump anything through their ventilation
systems other than air.
"People already stay there and gamble," Schwartz said. "People staying
there longer doesn't mean they're going to gamble more."
Schwartz said casinos use air handlers, giant pumps that refresh all the
air in the room every five minutes. He said infusing the ventilation
system with anything would be contrary to the current attitude of casino
management: they want people to play up to their budgets for
entertainment, but no more.
Manipulating gamblers' behavior surreptitiously would pose too great a
risk for a public relations nightmare, Schwartz said.
"Something like that would seem so boldly predatory it would raise that
issue — do you want to take all their money?" he said.
Schwartz also contends that rumors of casinos pumping oxygen through the
vents to keep players awake at night is nothing more than urban legend.
He said the idea that a casino would infuse a ventilation system with a
chemical — even an organic one — was hard to believe.
"They work pretty hard to try to keep the air as clean as possible,"
Schwartz said. "But who knows, there could be a giant alien base under
the Strip."
Science Questioned
Enhanced Air echoes the claims of Winnifred Cutler, a Pennsylvania
researcher who isolated human pheromones in the 1980s. Scientists have
long known that animals — especially insects — produce the natural
chemical, which operates as a sexual attractant. Insect pheromones,
particularly those from some beetle species, are commonly used as a
natural pesticide to attract harmful bugs to traps.
The most common use of human pheromones — or their synthetic
counterparts — is as an additive to colognes and is marketed as an
opposite-sex attractant.
Cutler concedes that while her published research established the
existence of human pheromones, no one is sure how they work.
"Researchers suspect that airborne pheromones may be detected by the
olfactory (smelling) system," Cutler wrote. "Scientists have identified
two possible sites inside the nose that might serve as receptors for
pheromones — the olfactory epithelium and/or the vomeronasal organ."
Balderdash, says Duke University neurobiologist and pheromone researcher
Lawrence Katz. "Scientifically I can tell you it's extremely dubious,"
Katz said. "If the VMO exists at all, it's nonfunctional."
Katz said that even where anatomical remnants of the vomeronasal organ
— commonly referred to as the VMO — are present, evolution has made
it nonfunctional, much like the appendix.
"There's really no scientific evidence that's generally accepted by the
scientific community that identifies these compounds as working," Katz
said. "Based on molecular biology, the nuts and bolts of the system are
no longer functional in the human."
Katz conceded, though, that our breathing system hasn't been eliminated
as a possible conduit. "Our regular olfactory sense may be able to
detect chemicals that carry messages," he said.
Still, Katz doesn't buy the idea the pheromones pumped through a
ventilation system would affect behavior.
"Most pheromones are used for aggressive interactions, marking territory
or sexual attraction," Katz said. "They're not a kind of aromatherapy
application. There are many claims of subconscious influence on consumer
behavior, but there's very little independent scientific evidence
outside of the company's own claims."
Caveat Emptor
Enhanced Air Technologies sells an air distribution system that will
cover up to 10,000 square feet for $450. Four-liter pheromone infused
gels that last two to four weeks sell for $96 each, a paltry sum for a
10,000-square-foot store if sales increase 17 percent.
Are local stores patronizing Enhanced Air Technologies? It's impossible
to say. The company won't name names and representatives of some large
chains operating locally either didn't return calls or declined comment.
Although the effectiveness of the system remains unclear, the ethicists
still hold that consumers should be notified if such a device is in use.
"People should have a right not to subject themselves to influences they
don't have any control over," Winsdale said.
 
 
 
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O

Oscar_Lives

No wonder I get a hard-on when I go to the tittie bar. They must use those
Pheromes there!





Hey guys this article is in todays paper .
was wondering what you guys think of this,,
is it real? and possible?? read the copy paste below============copy
paste begin

GALVESTON COUNTY DAILY NEWS
Texas' Oldest Newspaper
http://galvestondailynews.com
Company claims pheromones boost retail sales

Published February 15, 2004
Your favorite department store might seem a little friendlier, you might
shop a little longer and you might feel so serene that you plunk down
the cash for an extra pair of shoes.
That's the scenario a Vancouver, B.C., company is peddling to retailers.
Enhanced Air Technologies claims their proprietary synthetic human
pheromone compound - pumped through a store's ventilation system -
makes shoppers feel more at ease.
Enhanced Air's Director of Development Nigel Malkin said the company's
product, Commercaire, makes consumers feel comfortable and secure so
they shop longer and spend more.
Ethicists at the University of Texas Medical Branch and the University
of Houston - Clear Lake said the practice is offensive if consumers
aren't told the system is in use, and one of the country's leading
experts in pheromone research questioned the validity of the company's
scientific claims.
But Enhanced Air promises big sales boosts and spiking customer loyalty.
"The compound doesn't cause consumers to get into a spending frenzy so
much as it causes them to feel more at ease in an environment and more
receptive to sales messages," said Malkin.
Ethics Questioned
Bill Winslade, a University of Texas Medical Branch ethicist who is also
a lawyer, said using such a system without notifying shoppers would be
deplorable.
"I would certainly be strongly opposed to the use of substances of that
sort surreptitiously because to use something to try to affect the
thoughts and feelings of consumers without their knowledge is clearly
unethical if not illegal," Winslade said. "I would think they should be
required to post a highly visible notice that they were doing something
like that."
Neither state nor federal laws currently regulate the practice.
University of Houston - Clear Lake philosophy professor Paul Wagner,
who is the school's director of the Project in Professional Ethics,
agreed that consumers should be warned.
"If you did it without me knowing, you're kind of a scoundrel," said
Wagner. "You're sneaking up on me, you're ambushing me."
Winslade said that as a marketing tool it's vastly different than
advertising. "At least you're exposed to ads directly," he said.
"There's something more sinister about something that's released into
the air that you can't see or smell or know it's there."
The ethical line is less clear if consumers know that a store is pumping
something through the air system that affects mood or behavior. Winslade
said no one would take issue with a store offering free coffee and
doughnuts to make their customers feel more at ease, but that scenario
offers consumers a choice. "That's an open behavior," said Winslade.
"This seems so sneaky."
Wagner said stores could potentially turn notification to their
advantage by advertising the practice, telling shoppers the system was
in use for their comfort and enjoyment - but again, it's a matter of
notice.
"At least you've had an opportunity to decide," Wagner said. "Is there
something patently wrong with piping these things through the
ventilation system? Not necessarily."
Wagner said that doing so without notice to shoppers, though, was
predatory.
Business Boon
Malkin said the compound was developed for a Las Vegas casino to keep
gamblers in a better mood.
"We're now seeing huge demand from other sectors, especially in the
retail and restaurant industries," said Malkin. "Our clients are
reporting increases in their bottom lines across the board."
According to the company's marketing materials, an unnamed chain of
retail stores tested the synthetic phero-mone compound in half of its
stores. The company stores using the system saw a 14-percent sales
increase compared to the same quarter one year earlier. Enhanced Air
says the stores that weren't equipped with the system saw a dip in sales
of more than 5 percent, which the retailer chalked up to a sluggish
economy.
Citing a confidentiality policy, the company would not disclose the
names of any of its customers.
Casino Expert Skeptical
University of Nevada - Las Vegas professor David Schwartz is head of
the school's Gaming Studies Research Center and the author of "Suburban
Xanadu: The Casino Resort on the Las Vegas Strip and Beyond." Schwartz
said he knew of no casinos that pump anything through their ventilation
systems other than air.
"People already stay there and gamble," Schwartz said. "People staying
there longer doesn't mean they're going to gamble more."
Schwartz said casinos use air handlers, giant pumps that refresh all the
air in the room every five minutes. He said infusing the ventilation
system with anything would be contrary to the current attitude of casino
management: they want people to play up to their budgets for
entertainment, but no more.
Manipulating gamblers' behavior surreptitiously would pose too great a
risk for a public relations nightmare, Schwartz said.
"Something like that would seem so boldly predatory it would raise that
issue - do you want to take all their money?" he said.
Schwartz also contends that rumors of casinos pumping oxygen through the
vents to keep players awake at night is nothing more than urban legend.
He said the idea that a casino would infuse a ventilation system with a
chemical - even an organic one - was hard to believe.
"They work pretty hard to try to keep the air as clean as possible,"
Schwartz said. "But who knows, there could be a giant alien base under
the Strip."
Science Questioned
Enhanced Air echoes the claims of Winnifred Cutler, a Pennsylvania
researcher who isolated human pheromones in the 1980s. Scientists have
long known that animals - especially insects - produce the natural
chemical, which operates as a sexual attractant. Insect pheromones,
particularly those from some beetle species, are commonly used as a
natural pesticide to attract harmful bugs to traps.
The most common use of human pheromones - or their synthetic
counterparts - is as an additive to colognes and is marketed as an
opposite-sex attractant.
Cutler concedes that while her published research established the
existence of human pheromones, no one is sure how they work.
"Researchers suspect that airborne pheromones may be detected by the
olfactory (smelling) system," Cutler wrote. "Scientists have identified
two possible sites inside the nose that might serve as receptors for
pheromones - the olfactory epithelium and/or the vomeronasal organ."
Balderdash, says Duke University neurobiologist and pheromone researcher
Lawrence Katz. "Scientifically I can tell you it's extremely dubious,"
Katz said. "If the VMO exists at all, it's nonfunctional."
Katz said that even where anatomical remnants of the vomeronasal organ
- commonly referred to as the VMO - are present, evolution has made
it nonfunctional, much like the appendix.
"There's really no scientific evidence that's generally accepted by the
scientific community that identifies these compounds as working," Katz
said. "Based on molecular biology, the nuts and bolts of the system are
no longer functional in the human."
Katz conceded, though, that our breathing system hasn't been eliminated
as a possible conduit. "Our regular olfactory sense may be able to
detect chemicals that carry messages," he said.
Still, Katz doesn't buy the idea the pheromones pumped through a
ventilation system would affect behavior.
"Most pheromones are used for aggressive interactions, marking territory
or sexual attraction," Katz said. "They're not a kind of aromatherapy
application. There are many claims of subconscious influence on consumer
behavior, but there's very little independent scientific evidence
outside of the company's own claims."
Caveat Emptor
Enhanced Air Technologies sells an air distribution system that will
cover up to 10,000 square feet for $450. Four-liter pheromone infused
gels that last two to four weeks sell for $96 each, a paltry sum for a
10,000-square-foot store if sales increase 17 percent.
Are local stores patronizing Enhanced Air Technologies? It's impossible
to say. The company won't name names and representatives of some large
chains operating locally either didn't return calls or declined comment.
Although the effectiveness of the system remains unclear, the ethicists
still hold that consumers should be notified if such a device is in use.
"People should have a right not to subject themselves to influences they
don't have any control over," Winsdale said.
 

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