Painting cracked external render


M

Martin

Hi,

The external render on my house is well overdue for painting. The house
is around 8 years old and I believe this will be the first time it has
been painted since new.

There are a number of hairline settlement cracks in the render which
presumably need to be filled before I paint it. Some of them are genuine
hairlines, whilst others are possibly as much as half a millimetre wide.

The surface of the render has a sandy texture so I assume I can't just
use the same "slap some polyfilla in and sand it down" technique that I
would use on an internal wall..

Can anyone advise me as to what I should fill them with?

Picture at http://www.rimfall.demon.co.uk/private/cracks.jpg

Thanks,
Martin.
 
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B

Brian G

Martin said:
Hi,

The external render on my house is well overdue for painting. The
house is around 8 years old and I believe this will be the first time
it has been painted since new.

There are a number of hairline settlement cracks in the render which
presumably need to be filled before I paint it. Some of them are
genuine hairlines, whilst others are possibly as much as half a
millimetre wide.
The surface of the render has a sandy texture so I assume I can't just
use the same "slap some polyfilla in and sand it down" technique that
I would use on an internal wall..

Can anyone advise me as to what I should fill them with?

Picture at http://www.rimfall.demon.co.uk/private/cracks.jpg

Thanks,
Martin.
Martin,

Have a look at this link -- http://www.sandtex.co.uk/ -- it will give you
some good information.

As a matter of interest, Sandtex is possibly not the cheapest of materials,
but I would recommend it, as when it is properly applied, it will last many
years.

Remember that proper preparation, correct paint application and good quality
materials is the secret of longevity - follow this advice and you shouldn't
have to recoat the walls for at least 5 years.

Brian G
 
L

Lobster

Martin said:
Hi,

The external render on my house is well overdue for painting. The house
is around 8 years old and I believe this will be the first time it has
been painted since new.

There are a number of hairline settlement cracks in the render which
presumably need to be filled before I paint it. Some of them are genuine
hairlines, whilst others are possibly as much as half a millimetre wide.
You could use any exterior-grade filler; you just need to make sure
there's no surplus remaining when it's dry; ie wipe it away when still
wet as you can't sand it. But TBH I'm not sure I'd even bother:
exterior masonry paint is pretty thick claggy stuff and I'd have thought
would fill and cover at least the majority of your cracks perfectly well.

David
 
H

Huge

Hi,

The external render on my house is well overdue for painting. The house
is around 8 years old and I believe this will be the first time it has
been painted since new.

There are a number of hairline settlement cracks in the render which
presumably need to be filled before I paint it. Some of them are genuine
hairlines, whilst others are possibly as much as half a millimetre wide.

The surface of the render has a sandy texture so I assume I can't just
use the same "slap some polyfilla in and sand it down" technique that I
would use on an internal wall..

Can anyone advise me as to what I should fill them with?

Picture at http://www.rimfall.demon.co.uk/private/cracks.jpg
Masonry paint will cover the hairline ones. I'm painting my rendered
house right now (Yes, yes, I'm typing on usenet...) and any bigger
cracks I raked out with a triangular scraper, filled with vinyl frame
sealer from Wicks and painted over. Any blown render should be removed
and rerendered - we've already had a couple of sections done.
 
L

Lobster

Gio said:
Hi Martin, looking at the photo and perhaps someone in the trade could
comment given its 8 year life but don't the cracks indicate perhaps a whole
section of render is loosening off given the shape they take? If you tap
the render is it starting to sound hollow behind at all ?
Well, I had much worse cracks than than these my pebbledash render,
below a downstairs window, and there was an area about 2' x 2' which was
completely 'blown' as you describe, and causing damp inside the house.
Rather than hacking off, I decided to try the bodge repair first: just
filled the cracks with Tetrion filler and painted the whole wall with
Sandtex.

This would be about 6-7 years ago. It now looks absolutely fine; the
only sign of a problem is that you can hear it's hollow behind if you
tap it, and all the dampness inside has gone.

David
 
S

Simon

Martin said:
Hi,

The external render on my house is well overdue for painting. The house
is around 8 years old and I believe this will be the first time it has
been painted since new.

There are a number of hairline settlement cracks in the render which
presumably need to be filled before I paint it. Some of them are genuine
hairlines, whilst others are possibly as much as half a millimetre wide.

The surface of the render has a sandy texture so I assume I can't just
use the same "slap some polyfilla in and sand it down" technique that I
would use on an internal wall..

Can anyone advise me as to what I should fill them with?

Picture at http://www.rimfall.demon.co.uk/private/cracks.jpg

Thanks,
Martin.
I've recently started repainting the rendered half of my house, and found
that Sandtex paint fills in the fine cracks quite nicely.

To go slightly off topic, why are houses built using render? The brick-faced
half of my house doesn't seem to require any maintenance, but the rendered
half (the top half of course) is going to need repainting every 5-10 years,
with lots of ladder and scaffold hassle involved. Is render on top of ugly
breeze blocks construction heaper than building with bricks?
 
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M

Martin

Hi,

Thanks for the opinions everyone, that's pretty much the sort of thing I
was hoping to hear.

All the best,
Martin.
 

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