Painted 32mm waste


J

JohnW

Have a leak on a solvent weld 32mm bathroom basin waste. The existing
pipe has been painted. Does anyone have a recommendation on which will
be easiest/work best for replacing the bad pipework and connecting to
the painted bits - solvent weld, compression or push fit? Is it best
to remove the paint first or does this action mean that the scratched
area is worse than the paint?

Thanks for your help

John
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

The Natural Philosopher

JohnW said:
Have a leak on a solvent weld 32mm bathroom basin waste. The existing
pipe has been painted. Does anyone have a recommendation on which will
be easiest/work best for replacing the bad pipework and connecting to
the painted bits - solvent weld, compression or push fit? Is it best
to remove the paint first or does this action mean that the scratched
area is worse than the paint?

Thanks for your help

John
replace the lot and repaint fresh. Its cheap enough.
paint must be cleaned off pipe to be welded.
 
T

The Medway Handyman

JohnW said:
Have a leak on a solvent weld 32mm bathroom basin waste. The existing
pipe has been painted. Does anyone have a recommendation on which will
be easiest/work best for replacing the bad pipework and connecting to
the painted bits - solvent weld, compression or push fit? Is it best
to remove the paint first or does this action mean that the scratched
area is worse than the paint?
You have to remove all the paint whatever solution you choose, no easy way
around it - or cut back to unpainted pipe. Best chance [1] of removing the
paint is boiling water, if possible.

[1] Not much of a chance, its a bugger to get orf.
 
M

meow2222

The said:
JohnW said:
Have a leak on a solvent weld 32mm bathroom basin waste. The existing
pipe has been painted. Does anyone have a recommendation on which will
be easiest/work best for replacing the bad pipework and connecting to
the painted bits - solvent weld, compression or push fit? Is it best
to remove the paint first or does this action mean that the scratched
area is worse than the paint?
You have to remove all the paint whatever solution you choose, no easy way
around it - or cut back to unpainted pipe. Best chance [1] of removing the
paint is boiling water, if possible.

[1] Not much of a chance, its a bugger to get orf.
Does a steel scourer not work? Another option is caustic soda.


NT
 
A

Andrew Gabriel

The said:
JohnW said:
Have a leak on a solvent weld 32mm bathroom basin waste. The existing
pipe has been painted. Does anyone have a recommendation on which will
be easiest/work best for replacing the bad pipework and connecting to
the painted bits - solvent weld, compression or push fit? Is it best
to remove the paint first or does this action mean that the scratched
area is worse than the paint?
You have to remove all the paint whatever solution you choose, no easy way
around it - or cut back to unpainted pipe. Best chance [1] of removing the
paint is boiling water, if possible.

[1] Not much of a chance, its a bugger to get orf.
Does a steel scourer not work? Another option is caustic soda.
A piece of sandpaper wrapped around the pipe would take it off.
Note that, if it's been painted correctly with just oil-based
gloss topcoat, you won't get all the paint pigment off as it
dissolves into the plastic surface.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Y

YAPH

Have a leak on a solvent weld 32mm bathroom basin waste. The existing
pipe has been painted. Does anyone have a recommendation on which will
be easiest/work best for replacing the bad pipework and connecting to
the painted bits - solvent weld, compression or push fit? Is it best
to remove the paint first or does this action mean that the scratched
area is worse than the paint?
Push fit won't connect to solvent weld: they're different sizes. So
the choices are solvent weld or compression. Which is easier and more
suitable? Either way I'd remove any bulky runs of paint. Emulsion
scrapes off easily, oil-based is harder to shift. If you're going for
solvent weld you should scrape the paint off back to the plastic. Doesn't
have to be perfectly clean but you want the cement to bond the plastic,
not the paint.
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top