Paint peels off walls


B

BraileTrail

Hi,

I have recently decorated 2 rooms and started to decorate a third.
They all had holes, cracks and other blemishes that needed filling.
When preparing the walls for filling it was easy to peel off large
patches of emulsion paint several layers (and colours) thick. The
plaster behind the paint looks in good condition and there are no
obvious signs of damp in the walls. 2 of the rooms were first floor
and one was ground floor. The 2 first floor rooms were external walls
and the ground floor room was an internal wall. Some areas of paint
are still firmly attached and I was able to feather the edge so that
it is not noticeable after repainting The house is early 70's with
insulated cavity walls.

Is it common for paint to peel off like this, if not what could be the
cause?

Thanks
BraileTrail
 
Ad

Advertisements

A

Andrew Gabriel

Hi,

I have recently decorated 2 rooms and started to decorate a third.
They all had holes, cracks and other blemishes that needed filling.
When preparing the walls for filling it was easy to peel off large
patches of emulsion paint several layers (and colours) thick. The
plaster behind the paint looks in good condition and there are no
obvious signs of damp in the walls. 2 of the rooms were first floor
and one was ground floor. The 2 first floor rooms were external walls
and the ground floor room was an internal wall. Some areas of paint
are still firmly attached and I was able to feather the edge so that
it is not noticeable after repainting The house is early 70's with
insulated cavity walls.

Is it common for paint to peel off like this, if not what could be the
cause?
It's quite common, due to using wrong paint (or no dilution) as the
first coat on the plaster (common), and/or the plaster surface was
over-polished (less common), and it doesn't usually show up until
after you've bought the house so the builder couldn't care less.
In either case, the paint binder doesn't get into the plaster
surface, so there's little bonding.
 
B

BraileTrail

Andrew,

Thanks for the help.

It's quite common, due to using wrong paint (or no dilution) as the
first coat on the plaster (common), and/or the plaster surface was
We normally use Dulux emulsions, if I now apply dilute coat of diluted
emulsion to the bare plaster will that prevent the issue recuring in
the future?
What dilution do you recommended, 20% water to 80% paint?

over-polished (less common), and it doesn't usually show up until
after you've bought the house so the builder couldn't care less.
I guess the paint has lasted 30+ years so can't complain too much. :)
I've just never seen it before and was worried it might have a more
serious cause.

Thanks,
BraileTrail
 
T

Tim Watts

BraileTrail said:
Andrew,

Thanks for the help.



We normally use Dulux emulsions, if I now apply dilute coat of diluted
emulsion to the bare plaster will that prevent the issue recuring in
the future?
What dilution do you recommended, 20% water to 80% paint?



I guess the paint has lasted 30+ years so can't complain too much. :)
I've just never seen it before and was worried it might have a more
serious cause.
I don't think so. If it is 30 years old I would not complain. Take off what
wants to fall off with a paper stripping blade (sometimes a steamer can help
lift dodgey paint - I had that happen once - was stripping paper and it took
off the layer of vinyl finish painter underneath - well mostly...)

Normally, I use white matt Dulux (aka ceiling paint) with about 10% water
added for the sealing (aka "mist") coat.

I must admit that I did not know about "mist" coats and did one room direct
to plaster with Dulux Endurance matt. I have had no problems after > 2
years, thankfully - but it was my own plastering and the concept of a highly
polished finished did not exist - I was happy with "mostly flat". Probably
why I got away with it...

All other rooms had the mist coat applied and I have had no problems there
either, except applying it - the extra dilution makes it spatter like a
bastard with a roller. I would maybe advise a brush or pad if you are doing
it...
 
B

Brian Gaff

Also of course if there has ever been paper on there who knows what the
paste was made of!

Brian
 
N

NT

Hi,

I have recently decorated 2 rooms and started to decorate a third.
They all had holes, cracks and other blemishes that needed filling.
When preparing the walls for filling it was easy to peel off large
patches of emulsion paint several layers (and colours) thick. The
plaster behind the paint looks in good condition and there are no
obvious signs of damp in the walls. 2 of the rooms were first floor
and one was ground floor. The 2 first floor rooms were external walls
and the ground floor room was an internal wall. Some areas of paint
are still firmly attached and I was able to feather the edge so that
it is not noticeable after repainting The house is early 70's with
insulated cavity walls.

Is it common for paint to peel off like this, if not what could be the
cause?

Thanks
BraileTrail
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Paint#Preparation_2


NT
 
Ad

Advertisements

W

Weatherlawyer

Normally, I use white matt Dulux (aka ceiling paint) with about 10% water
added for the sealing (aka "mist") coat.

I must admit that I did not know about "mist" coats and did one room direct
to plaster with Dulux Endurance matt. I have had no problems after > 2
years, thankfully - but it was my own plastering and the concept of a highly
polished finished did not exist - I was happy with "mostly flat". Probably
why I got away with it...

All other rooms had the mist coat applied and I have had no problems there
either, except applying it - the extra dilution makes it spatter like a
bastard with a roller. I would maybe advise a brush or pad if you are doing
it...
I presume this is the secondary reason for builders to use trade paint
on a new home?

Quick and cheap and crap but after 6 months the new owner would be
getting antsy with magnolia by then anyway?

I always assumed that when it turned to dust the better paints would
cope with it, I don't know why I thought that; there is nothing in
British managerial history to make me suspect they ever knew what they
were doing. Exponentially so with building site owners.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top