Oven will not heat up


B

BM

Hi,

I have a Kenmore range Model # 790.95889301. One day when it was on it
tripped the curcut on my circuit board. When I flipped the circuit
breaker back on the stove would heat up but not the oven or broiler. What
could be wrong with it?

thank you

Bob
 
Ad

Advertisements

H

harry

Hi,

I have a Kenmore range Model # 790.95889301.  One day when it was on it
tripped the curcut on my circuit board.   When I flipped the circuit
breaker back on the stove would heat up but not the oven or broiler.  What
could be wrong with it?

thank you

BobAds not by this site
Check the oven timer on it is not in the "off" position first job.
 
T

trader4

Hi,

I have a Kenmore range Model # 790.95889301.  One day when it was on it
tripped the curcut on my circuit board.   When I flipped the circuit
breaker back on the stove would heat up but not the oven or broiler.  What
could be wrong with it?

thank you

Bob
It sounds like something shorted out, tripped the breaker,
and then went open. Like for example a wire shorting to
the cabinet. It would generate enough heat to melt it so
it goes open and at the same time enough current so
the breaker trips. You can reset the breaker now because
what once caused it has vaporized.

If you have knowledge of electricity, some basic tools, a circuit
schematic and a meter you can figure it out. If
not, time to call a pro.
 
O

Oren

Hi,

I have a Kenmore range Model # 790.95889301. One day when it was on it
tripped the curcut on my circuit board. When I flipped the circuit
breaker back on the stove would heat up but not the oven or broiler. What
could be wrong with it?

thank you

Bob
Pull the element (s) and look for scorch / burn marks at the socket.

Might be temporary. Ya gotta look...
 
K

Ken

Oren said:
Pull the element (s) and look for scorch / burn marks at the socket.

Might be temporary. Ya gotta look...
It goes without saying that you should turn off the circuit breaker when
you do this. Safety first.
 
Ad

Advertisements

B

BM

Next step:

0. Check the bake element for any spot that appears to be damaged.
When bake elements burn out, it usually happens in a relatively short
area like an inch or two. Use a flashlight to check for any anomolies
along the length of the bake element of run your fingers over it
feeling for areas that are very rough. If you don't find anything
wrong, go on to Step #1.

1. Pull the fuse holder to the stove out of the fuse box or trip BOTH
of it's circuit breakers off in the breaker panel. It will have TWO
50 amp circuit breakers, and both of them need to be off. If you have
a fuse box, there will be a fuse holder that contains two 50 amp fuses
in it so that you can't remove one fuse without removing both of them.
That's done for safety reasons.

2. If the stove has a range cord and receptacle, maybe unplug the
stove as well so that you can move it where you have unfettered access
to the back panel.

3. Remove the screws holding the rear sheet metal cover on the stove,
and remove that cover.

4. The terminals going to the bake element in the oven should be
visible. Look for a burnt off wire there.

5. It's possible, but not likely, that a wire burned off at the oven
temperature control in the console or at the bake/broil selector
switch. So, basically look around everywhere to find a wire burned
off, but it's most likely one of the wires going to the bake element
terminals.
The elements and wires looked fine so i pulled the circuit board from
the control/clock unit and see a big burn mark. if I replace that unit
I should be good to go? I hope
 
T

trader4

The elements and wires looked fine so i pulled the circuit board from
the control/clock unit and see a big burn mark.  if I replace that unit
I should be good to go?   I hope- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

Maybe. But here is the risk. Without the skills to work on
electrical eqpt, you won't be able to figure out if anything else is
wrong.
The correct procedure is to figure out if
anything else is wrong that caused that board to fail. It
could have failed on it's own. Or it could have failed because
something else failed first somewhere else, ie there is a
short that caused an overload and burned up the board.
And if that other problem exists and is still there, the new
board could burn up too. If it was a $25 part, that wouldn't
be so bad. But when you see what a new board actually
costs, you may want to re-evaluate how to proceed. Hell,
when you see what that board costs and depending on the
age of the stove, it might be time for a new stove.
 
T

trader4

It seems that is the way it is for many things.  The replacement parts cost
a big percentage of just replacing the whole unit.

I still think of the deal that the Commodor computer company had years ago.
They wold fix  any computer for about $ 75.  When it got the the repair
place, they would open it up and replace the whole insides with a board that
cost them about $ 50.  I just don't remember what the computer cost back
then.
I don;t know how it works right now, but about 10 years
ago I had my Tivo replaced. They charged a flat $100.
I sent my old one in and they sent me a refurbished one.
I thought that was a fair deal.
 
H

hrhofmann

Maybe.  But here is the risk.  Without the skills to work on
electrical eqpt, you won't be able to figure out if anything else is
wrong.
The correct procedure is to figure out if
anything else is wrong that caused that board to fail.  It
could have failed on it's own.  Or it could have failed because
something else failed first somewhere else, ie there is a
short that caused an overload and burned up the board.
And if that other problem exists and is still there, the new
board could burn up too.  If it was a $25 part, that wouldn't
be so bad.  But when you see what a new board actually
costs, you may want to re-evaluate how to proceed.  Hell,
when you see what that board costs and depending on the
age of the stove, it might be time for a new stove.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Can you take a photo of the board and post it? Also,does the
schematic show the printed board? If you can trace the burned area
on the board to the actual wiring, that will give you an idea where to
look for the problem that caused the burn.
 
B

Bob

Can you take a photo of the board and post it? Also,does the
schematic show the printed board? If you can trace the burned area
on the board to the actual wiring, that will give you an idea where to
look for the problem that caused the burn.
here are photos of the control unit.
is it possible that burnout would kill the oven and broiler heater but
the stove top and clock, timer, and all buttons still work?
even if something caused the control panel to partly burn out it still
needs to be replaced, correct?
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

trader4

here are photos of the control unit.

I don't see any photos. If you tried to post them directly
here, you can;t, because it's not a newsgroup that supports
pics.

is it possible that burnout would kill the oven and broiler heater but
the stove top and clock, timer, and all buttons still work?
Yes



even if something caused the control panel to partly burn out it still
needs to be replaced, correct?- Hide quoted text -
Yes. The only issue is if that "something else" caused it
and still exists and you put in a new control panel, you could burn
out the new one as soon as you turn it on.
 
B

Bob

I don't see any photos. If you tried to post them directly
here, you can;t, because it's not a newsgroup that supports
pics.



Yes. The only issue is if that "something else" caused it
and still exists and you put in a new control panel, you could burn
out the new one as soon as you turn it on.
where would i post the photos?
is it also possible that the problem is just in the control panel?
 
T

trader4

where would i post the photos?
IDK, but I'm sure others will give suggestions. Or you
could google for "free picture hosting" etc

is it also possible that the problem is just in the control panel?- Hide quoted text -
Sure it could be just the panel. I'd say it's 50-50.
 
Ad

Advertisements

F

Frank

where would i post the photos?
is it also possible that the problem is just in the control panel?
We had our control panel replaced a couple of years ago at about half
the cost of a new unit. DYI would be much cheaper but then earlier this
year we had problems like yours with apparently oven shorting out
someplace else so we bought a new one.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top