Oven - RCD or not?


J

John

My original plan was to have 2 ring mains in the kitchen - one NOT protected
by the RCD which would carry just 4 things - the CH boiler, the fridge, the
freezer and the oven (which needs a 13A supply). The other ring would carry
everything else - kettle, washing machine, toaster, telly, etc., etc.

The guy has dropped a b*****k and made the NON-protected circuit a radial,
feeding just the boiler, the fridge and the freezer. He's used 2.5mm cable
and I know that as long as the MCB is 20A rated, that, in itself, is OK. The
oven is now on the protected circuit and I know that that circuit - even
given the extra loading of the oven - is, in itself, OK.

But it's not what I planned and it's not what I asked for.

To put it right would mean that he would need to use 4 junction boxes, which
would be under the floorboards in the bathroom - the same floorboards that
are going to be sheeted over with hardboard or thin ply before having vinyl
cushionfloor lain on top - in other words, not easy to get to them if needed
later on. OR, the other way to put it right would mean hacking chases in 3
of the kitchen walls - 2 of which have been newly plastered, the other newly
tiled :eek:(

So, should the oven be RCD-protected (leave things as they are) or not (get
him to put things right)??

TIA
John.
 
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J

Jonathan Pearson

Christian said:
I reckon you'd get the fridge, freezer, oven and CH on the 20A
radial, which will run in 2.5mm cable.

Most ovens are 2.2kW plus a bit for the fan. Fridge and freezer won't
run continuously and are probably only about 300W each when firing.
CH will take very little. Even if the oven takes 3kW, there's still
1.6kW to run the other appliances, which is easily enough.

Christian.
I think he knew that and that was his original plan - however as I
understand it, the sparky ( or he forgot to communicate properly to the
sparky?) has forgotten about the oven and put it on the RCD side of the
circuit - he want to know if people have had problems with the oven on the
RCD side of the circuit - Our oven is on the RCD side and so far we've not
had any problems

Jon
 
J

Jonathan Pearson

Christian said:
Ah. I thought the original plan was to put a ring on the non-RCD side
and the sparky only put the oven on the RCD side because he thought
the 20A radial wasn't man enough, even though actually it is.

Christian.
Yes when I read it at first, it was the same thing that jumped into my head
also, mainly as we've been through the same sort of thing!

jon
 
J

John

Jonathan Pearson said:
Yes when I read it at first, it was the same thing that jumped into my
head also, mainly as we've been through the same sort of thing!

jon
Yep, your right Jon. Initially wanted two rings, the oven being on the
non-protected one. Sparky has put oven on protected ring and yes, I was just
wondering if that will be a problem regarding nuisance tripping or other
problem. If it's OK for an oven to be protected by the RCD then I'll leave
it as it is, thereby avoiding lots of hassle.

Thanks,
John.
 
J

John

Christian McArdle said:
Ah. I thought the original plan was to put a ring on the non-RCD side and
the sparky only put the oven on the RCD side because he thought the 20A
radial wasn't man enough, even though actually it is.

Christian.
Reading my own post again, I suppose it does sound confusing - sorry :eek:)

I never wanted a radial circuit in the first place, but rather two rings -
one RCD protected and one not, the UNprotected ring to take the oven,
fridge, freezer and boiler. Sparky made mistake and ran a 2.5 from
CU>boiler>fridge>freezer and ended it there, forgetting about oven and then
back to CU.

So, oven is now on protected ring and I'm wondering if I'm going to get lots
of nuisance tripping or some other problem because of that. The house is
going to be let out so I don't want the tenants ringing every fart's end
saying that they can't use the oven.

Given the hassle it'll be to get him to put his mistake right, should I just
leave the oven on the protected circuit?

John.
 
J

John

Christian McArdle said:
How many of the following devices are there (or expected to be) on the RCD
side:

1. Washing machine.
2. Tumble Dryer
3. Dishwasher
4. Microwave.
5. Kettle.
6. Oven.

Christian.
One each of 1, 4, 5, and 6.

John.
 
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M

mitchd

John said:
My original plan was to have 2 ring mains in the kitchen - one NOT protected
by the RCD which would carry just 4 things - the CH boiler, the fridge, the
freezer and the oven (which needs a 13A supply). The other ring would carry
everything else - kettle, washing machine, toaster, telly, etc., etc.

The guy has dropped a b*****k and made the NON-protected circuit a radial,
feeding just the boiler, the fridge and the freezer. He's used 2.5mm cable
and I know that as long as the MCB is 20A rated, that, in itself, is OK. The
oven is now on the protected circuit and I know that that circuit - even
given the extra loading of the oven - is, in itself, OK.

But it's not what I planned and it's not what I asked for.

To put it right would mean that he would need to use 4 junction boxes, which
would be under the floorboards in the bathroom - the same floorboards that
are going to be sheeted over with hardboard or thin ply before having vinyl
cushionfloor lain on top - in other words, not easy to get to them if needed
later on. OR, the other way to put it right would mean hacking chases in 3
of the kitchen walls - 2 of which have been newly plastered, the other newly
tiled :eek:(

So, should the oven be RCD-protected (leave things as they are) or not (get
him to put things right)??

TIA
John.
just wondered why you planed the job and don't trust the electrician you
employed to do the work?
 
J

John

mitchd said:
just wondered why you planed the job and don't trust the electrician you
employed to do the work?
Because he's not actually an electrician. He's a builder who's doing lots of
other stuff for us and who also does wiring as well - building control have
been informed re: Part P, of course.

John.
 
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