OT: Wash clothes in a dishwasher?


T

The Natural Philosopher

Christian said:
You must have used a bad one. My dishwasher gets things a lot cleaner than I
do.
That says more about our washing up skills than about dishwashers..;-)
 
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M

manatbandq

Eric said:
Computer keyboards? Did you use detergent or run it without?
PCBs are often washed as part of the assembly process to remove flux
residues. You just need to be careful of any electromechanical
components that are not sealed. In the factory these would be hand
fitted after washing the board.

MBQ
 
E

Eric The Viking

PCBs are often washed as part of the assembly process to remove flux
residues. You just need to be careful of any electromechanical
components that are not sealed. In the factory these would be hand
fitted after washing the board.

MBQ
Good point m8.

Having thought about alternative uses for dishwashers, I suppose you could
fit one in your workshop and use it as a parts washer.

Get a big drum of diluted detergent and connect a hose to the water inlet of
the dishwasher, have the waste pipe of the dishwasher returning water to the
drum. Put your oily / dirty components in the dishwasher and let it have
it.

What do you think?

ETV
 
A

Andy Luckman (AJL Electronics)

Eric The Viking said:
Good point m8.
Not sure what a Glasgow motoray has to do with anything?

Having thought about alternative uses for dishwashers, I suppose you could
fit one in your workshop and use it as a parts washer.
Done by Mark Evans in his MGB restoration. He took his cylinder heads home
and sneaked them into the dishwasher when his other half was in bed / out.
 
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N

Nick

Andy said:
Done by Mark Evans in his MGB restoration. He took his cylinder heads home
and sneaked them into the dishwasher when his other half was in bed / out.
Excellent idea! Now will the dishwasher still run OK if I use
kerosene instead of water? I suppose using petrol is pushing my
luck :)
 
G

Guy King

The message <[email protected]>
from "Andy Luckman (AJL Electronics) said:
Done by Mark Evans in his MGB restoration. He took his cylinder heads home
and sneaked them into the dishwasher when his other half was in bed / out.
I remember a friend's mum being a trifle peeved when she discovered the
casings of an outboard in her dishwasher. Trouble is, it really was a
good way to get them clean.

I've often wondered about finding an old dishwasher and running it full
of paraffin for cleaning bits. I suspect some of the seals wouldn't work
to well - and forgetting to disconnect the heater might liven things up
a bit, too.
 
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Joined
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As usual for the start of a bank holiday weekend my washing machine has
decided to pack up.

Put simply, can a dishwasher be used for washing clothes in?

I'm not thinking of setting up a launderette based on dishwashers here, just
interested as to whether I could do an emergency wash of a pair of jeans -
or whether I would end up with a broken dishwasher to add to the broken
washing machine.

Have already considered the relative merits of washing underpants in the
dishwasher but have decided against this for various reasons.

I would appreciate your considered opinions ;-)


ETV
Yes, but you need caution and stay around while the cycles are on.
Best for smaller loads. Dispose on the racks between the pegs, panlegs can each go down one space. Sheets can belaid out over a half rack for a smaller bedsheet, etc.
Water temperature will be hot, unless you can adjust this?
Use only about a Tablespoon of liquid detergent. Go for the short cycle.
Can and do interrupt for the Rinse cycle, if needed.
No heat dry. Just open and let drip from the top rack for a while.
Then hang dry outside or wherever convenient for you.

Mostly works for sheets, pillowcases, towels, underwear, socks, workclothes, etc. Recommend bagging delicates, no wool, etc.
Heavier garments as jeans and cargoshorts, etc on the bottom rack.
Dispose within the rack pegs, with soiled side down. Make sure things do no go below the rack.
There is no movement so no wear and tear. There is enough going on to get most of the soil and stink out. Would say brush the fabric of any heavy built up residues as dirt or mud, first.
Yes, it is a bit tedious but it gets a lot of basic stuff done. Saves most trips to the laundromat and convenience of home and no travel.
Saves a lot of travel time and money.

Yesterday, washed a puffy all synthetic coat on top rack. Air dry. Done.
Edit, be mindful or temperatures for color transfers of items close to each other.
Sorta fiddly.
 
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