Oil filter change in old car - how often?


A

AL_n

I last changed the engine oil filter in my Mitsubishi 2.8 turbo deisel,
about 2 years ago. Is that pushing it, a bit? I should say it is a 16 year-
old vehicle.

What is the effect of *never* changing the oild filter? Does the filter
eventually clog up, or what?

As for oil changes, there is a slight leak in the rocker box gasket, so the
occasional oil top-ups amount to a complete oil change about every 2 years,
without needing to undo the sump nut - very convenient. ;-)

TIA

Al
 
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B

Bob Minchin

AL_n said:
I last changed the engine oil filter in my Mitsubishi 2.8 turbo deisel,
about 2 years ago. Is that pushing it, a bit? I should say it is a 16 year-
old vehicle.

What is the effect of *never* changing the oild filter? Does the filter
eventually clog up, or what?

As for oil changes, there is a slight leak in the rocker box gasket, so the
occasional oil top-ups amount to a complete oil change about every 2 years,
without needing to undo the sump nut - very convenient. ;-)

TIA

Al
6000ml/6months whichever is the sooner. more modern diesels are
12000ml/12months.

You might be adding clean oil regularly but the leak is not getting rid
of any of the sludge from your sump neither do you burn any sludge.

Workout how much hassle and cost to you of a seized engine compared with
2hrs max per year changing your own oil.

Go figure as our 'merkin friends say.

Bob
 
T

thirty-six

I last changed the engine oil filter in my Mitsubishi 2.8 turbo deisel,
about 2 years ago. Is that pushing it, a bit? I should say it is a 16 year-
old vehicle.

What is the effect of *never* changing the oild filter? Does the filter
eventually clog up, or what?
The filter will block oil flow, keeping the bypass valve open, meaning
the engine is running on unfiltered oil continuously. Carbon deposits
will help blow engine seals and there will be an increase in bore and
bearing wear. Tappets may gunge up causing erratic and possibly
dangerous running, think of a valve sticking while cornering on slippy
stuff.
As for oil changes, there is a slight leak in the rocker box gasket, so the
occasional oil top-ups amount to a complete oil change about every 2 years,
without needing to undo the sump nut - very convenient. ;-)
Should make an ideal demonstration when doing an oil change.
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

I last changed the engine oil filter in my Mitsubishi 2.8 turbo deisel,
about 2 years ago. Is that pushing it, a bit? I should say it is a 16
year- old vehicle.
Why not just look at the service details? All vehicles are not the same
and the maker generally knows best.
 
A

ARWadsworth

Bob said:
6000ml/6months whichever is the sooner. more modern diesels are
12000ml/12months.
Are you sure?

I am sure my 54 reg van has the oil change at around 30000 miles. I cannot
find the handbook at the moment to check that. Not that I need it as there
is a light comes on the dash to tell me to swap the oil and this is based on
the type and style of driving that I do.
 
H

harry

I last changed the engine oil filter in my Mitsubishi 2.8 turbo deisel,
about 2 years ago. Is that pushing it, a bit? I should say it is a 16 year-
old vehicle.

What is the effect of *never* changing the oild filter? Does the filter
eventually clog up, or what?

As for oil changes, there is a slight leak in the rocker box gasket, so the
occasional oil top-ups amount to a complete oil change about every 2 years,
without needing to undo the sump nut - very convenient. ;-)

TIA

Al
All filters block up eventually. In most cars, a bypass them opens
but this allows unfiltered oil to go round the engine.

The long molecules in oil get chopped up and the lubricating
properties are reduced.
Also metal fragmetnts, carbon and acids build up in the oil if
unchanged.

Not clever what you are doing.
 
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B

Bob Minchin

ARWadsworth said:
Are you sure?

I am sure my 54 reg van has the oil change at around 30000 miles. I cannot
find the handbook at the moment to check that. Not that I need it as there
is a light comes on the dash to tell me to swap the oil and this is based on
the type and style of driving that I do.
I wouldn't claim to be an expert but when service intervals started
increasing for petrol cars in the 90's, diesels stuck at 6000/6months
meaning (at the time, whilst fuel costs were lower for diesel) , the
increased servicing costs meant that diesels were only worthwhile if the
extended engine life was brought into the sums.
The diesel manufacturers responded and extended to 12k/12m which is the
case for my 54 plate ford diesel car.
I've not come across vehicles offering 30k miles servicing but now I
have bought my car, I've not continued to look at service intervals for
other makes.

As another poster mentioned, the makers recommendations are likely to be
correct.

Bob
 
J

js.b1

Large oil sumps (7-8L) mean twice as long oil drain intervals compared
to small (3.7-4.0L). It was all done for the fleet buyer who basically
wanted a) minimal servicing costs and b) resale on the used market to
be close to what they bought at on the subsidised fleet bulk buyer
market.

Nothing to stop someone using a fleet oil from a motor factor like
Comma, it will be a fair bit less. Note generic oil filters often have
different bypass oil pressure compared to OEM. This can raise its head
during cold starts etc.

Check your air filter if getting a bit forgetful, the rubber seal DOES
break down with age and go through the engine & lodge in the cat. I
know this because of the smell of burning rubber once and it was not
my tyres... had completely forgotten... must have been 8yrs rather
than the suggested 2yrs. Mileage wise it was right, but age wise
things do deteriorate. Likewise coolant level is easy to "drift off to
the back burner" when something somewhere gets a tiny bit leaky (crack
in a plastic fitting which only propogates over years and only opens
at certain temperatures).

Modern diesels are very hard on their oil, the particulate buildup is
severe and multiple short trips or poor monitoring of oil level can
result in very big bills. Things are also not well made, intercoolers
are the thinnest aluminium they could get to come out of the factory
without imploding on impact with a neutrino.
 
T

The Natural Philosopher

AL_n said:
I last changed the engine oil filter in my Mitsubishi 2.8 turbo deisel,
about 2 years ago. Is that pushing it, a bit? I should say it is a 16 year-
old vehicle.

What is the effect of *never* changing the oild filter? Does the filter
eventually clog up, or what?
yes.

As for oil changes, there is a slight leak in the rocker box gasket, so the
occasional oil top-ups amount to a complete oil change about every 2 years,
without needing to undo the sump nut - very convenient. ;-)
I would change the filter and drain teh oil about every 10k miles. It is
not a big job.

Failure to do that will limit engine life to about 80K miles max instead
of the 200K most engines will do if not abused.

Note to buyers:
Beware the 2 year old car with 120k on the clock: Or the one year old
with 60K..Its a reps car and many companies simply never service them at
all from new till resale. It may look shiny, but it probably never had a
pad change or an oil change in its life.

And in any case, if the pedal rubbers are worn and its got 20k on the
clock, worry. Its not so easy to clock cars as it was BUT you can get
the plates and the speedo off a wreck and put them on a high mileage
car..or just the speedo sometimes..
 
T

The Natural Philosopher

ARWadsworth said:
Are you sure?

I am sure my 54 reg van has the oil change at around 30000 miles. I cannot
find the handbook at the moment to check that. Not that I need it as there
is a light comes on the dash to tell me to swap the oil and this is based on
the type and style of driving that I do.
Thst VERY modern.

Really tight torlearnces and beter materials and beter design and
synthetic oils have pushed oil changes from 3000 miles (BMC A series) to
6000 miles (later BMC series) to 10k miles or annually (most modern cars
I have driven)

I believe some will do better..
 
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D

Dave Plowman (News)

And in any case, if the pedal rubbers are worn and its got 20k on the
clock, worry. Its not so easy to clock cars as it was BUT you can get
the plates and the speedo off a wreck and put them on a high mileage
car..or just the speedo sometimes..
A half decent car will store the mileage information elsewhere in
addition. Making it extremely difficult to alter the true reading without
it showing it has been tampered with.
 
T

The Natural Philosopher

Dave said:
A half decent car will store the mileage information elsewhere in
addition. Making it extremely difficult to alter the true reading without
it showing it has been tampered with.
but not impossible...
 
A

ARWadsworth

Huge said:
Bloody hell - did you hit the zero too many times?
No. I now have the manual. It's 2 years or 30000 miles and uses a SAE 5W-40
oil.
 
N

Neil Williams

Bloody hell - did you hit the zero too many times?
Some Vauxhall petrol engines are 2 years, 20000 miles. So I wouldn't
put it out of the realms of possibility for there to be a few vehicles
like that with modern engines and oils. Though changing more often
than that will probably do the engine good.

I think my Vectra (1.8 VVT petrol) is 1 year, 20000 miles, but as I do
less than 6K a year it's just annual anyway.

Neil
 
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D

Dave Plowman (News)

but not impossible...
Nothing is impossible. However, to change both the speedo and the engine
ECU - and alter them so they can't be traced - requires rather more skill
than the average car thief possesses. But then many buyers won't care that
they've bought stolen goods either. At a knock down price.
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

Some Vauxhall petrol engines are 2 years, 20000 miles. So I wouldn't
put it out of the realms of possibility for there to be a few vehicles
like that with modern engines and oils. Though changing more often
than that will probably do the engine good.
I'm not convinced it does. Most engines outlast the car anyway these days
- unless they suffer a failure like a broken cambelt or cooling system,
neither of which will be prevented by frequent oil changes.
 
T

thirty-six

I'm not convinced it does. Most engines outlast the car anyway these days
- unless they suffer a failure like a broken cambelt or cooling system,
neither of which will be prevented by frequent oil changes.
With two or three years between servicing, it's likely to be more
prevalent.
 
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D

Dave Plowman (News)

With two or three years between servicing, it's likely to be more
prevalent.
Most have a maximum time between services as well as a mileage limit -
specifically for low use vehicles. But there's nothing to stop you doing a
look over the engine as often as you want, rather than hoping it will be
done at oil change time.

I can - just - remember when cars went from 3000 to 5000 mile oil changes.
Exactly the same arguments were used then...
 

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