Odd question.


G

George

As you know I was going to scrape paint off the top elevation over the
weekend,alas it rained most of it which put the blockers on the work.

This never realy dawned on me before and I noticed the electricity companys
external armoured cable was going up one side of my property underneath and
along the stone ledge and then halfway down the other side house which then
went into the house next door which probably fed her mains cable in ie the
60 amp fuse.

Would you think I had cause to get in touch with the electric supplier to
reroute it from the ground up on the neighbours side of the property?

Most odd situation to run an outside mains armoured cable don't ya think?

TIA
 
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G

George

Forgot to say...

Terraced houses circular 1880's? no doubt the electric was put in sometime
after this date. ;-)
 
G

George

mogga said:
Ah why not ask. It can't hurt.

We got a letter saying we were having a new meter. Said date, chap
turns up, traditional sharp intake of breath and he organises another
man to come and do something. (A load of stuff pre-meter that was a
bit antique)
So a few months later two blokes turn up and remove the old stuff and
we think that's all that. But oh no, we're back on for a proper meter
man to come and remove the meter now.
When will that be? Gawd knows. How many teams it'll take to move your
cable I won't try to guess at. :)
I presume no charges was incurred on your side?

This cable looks bloody awful the way its running up&across the house, even
with a lick of paint it'll stand out like a sore thumb.
I'm sure its against the regs to have electric armoured cable of this ilk
exposed to the elements ie it should be buried underground and enter inside
the property?
 
T

The Wanderer

As you know I was going to scrape paint off the top elevation over the
weekend,alas it rained most of it which put the blockers on the work.

This never realy dawned on me before and I noticed the electricity companys
external armoured cable was going up one side of my property underneath and
along the stone ledge and then halfway down the other side house which then
went into the house next door which probably fed her mains cable in ie the
60 amp fuse.

Would you think I had cause to get in touch with the electric supplier to
reroute it from the ground up on the neighbours side of the property?

Most odd situation to run an outside mains armoured cable don't ya think?
No, very common to run looped services on the outside of terraced
properties.

One or Two questions:- Does the cable look fairly modern, does it look like
it's pvc sheathed or does it appear to have a woven fabric outer layer?

If it's pvc sheathed, it shouldn't be a problem to work around it provided
you tak eproper care. If it looks like it has the woven fabric outer layer,
call the local distribution co and tell them you think you have some very
old (like 60+ years) lead in cables where you want to work. Don't be
tempted to fiddle around that type of cable, it's prone to cracking on
bends, and the rubber insulation hardens, cracks and will fall off. They
should replace it FoC.

Is it a problem for you to have the cables routed to next door undereaves?
 
C

Colin Wilson

So a few months later two blokes turn up and remove the old stuff and
Welcome to the new "improved" government idea of introducing
"competition" to the electricity industry. The supplier (who you pay
your bill to) is seperate to the meter operator (a supplier doesn't
have to use the meter operator that used to cover that area) and
they're both seperate to the network operator who own the cables (and
the cable head / cutout you got changed).

In this wonderful "improved" world, no-one is allowed to talk to
anyone else in case it gives an unfair advantage in "competition", and
the only official way of "speaking" is to send what is known as a
"data flow" which may or may not contain the information the other
party needs, or end up at the right department.

In this instance, it's only the cable that needs moving, so contact
the local network operator.
I presume no charges was incurred on your side?
Shouldn't be - it's a refurbishment in effect.
This cable looks bloody awful the way its running up&across the house, even
with a lick of paint it'll stand out like a sore thumb.
I'm sure its against the regs to have electric armoured cable of this ilk
exposed to the elements ie it should be buried underground and enter inside
the property?
Are you sure it's a SWA - perhaps it's a hybrid or taped armour cable.
Also bear in mind the supply regs are a seperate beast from the 16th /
17th edition.

Either way, it's hard to visualise the cable / houses as described - a
pic might help :-}

If it's your house, and you want to be really awkward about it (note,
if this was an ex-council house, the council will have ostensibly
granted a wayleave / easement for this cable to be here as the
councils used to own the electricity companies) - ask to see the
wayleave for the cable.
 
S

Stuart Noble

Welcome to the new "improved" government idea of introducing
"competition" to the electricity industry. The supplier (who you pay
your bill to) is seperate to the meter operator (a supplier doesn't
have to use the meter operator that used to cover that area) and
they're both seperate to the network operator who own the cables (and
the cable head / cutout you got changed).

In this wonderful "improved" world, no-one is allowed to talk to
anyone else in case it gives an unfair advantage in "competition", and
the only official way of "speaking" is to send what is known as a
"data flow" which may or may not contain the information the other
party needs, or end up at the right department.
Competition always increases efficiency as we know :)

I'd just tell the buggers you're trying to renovate your home and their
bloody cable's in the way. I had to get BT to move a telegraph pole so
that I could erect scaffolding, and they came and did it within a couple
of days
 
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C

Colin Wilson

Competition always increases efficiency as we know :)

Sure, now you have 10 companies instead of 1, all with their own staff
/ pensions / finance depts to pay - not counting the seperation of the
old RECs into at least three companies each - all desperately trying
to offload responsibility and cost for anything they can elsewhere so
it doesn't affect their balance sheets.

See if you can work out how that is suddenly more efficient than a
single company doing it... I'm fooked if I can !
 
B

Bruce

Sure, now you have 10 companies instead of 1, all with their own staff
/ pensions / finance depts to pay - not counting the seperation of the
old RECs into at least three companies each - all desperately trying
to offload responsibility and cost for anything they can elsewhere so
it doesn't affect their balance sheets.

See if you can work out how that is suddenly more efficient than a
single company doing it... I'm fooked if I can !

Look how well it worked on the railways - one publicly owned company
was split into over a hundred separate private companies, and look
what a disaster that was!
 
S

Stuart Noble

Colin said:
Sure, now you have 10 companies instead of 1, all with their own staff
/ pensions / finance depts to pay - not counting the seperation of the
old RECs into at least three companies each - all desperately trying
to offload responsibility and cost for anything they can elsewhere so
it doesn't affect their balance sheets.

See if you can work out how that is suddenly more efficient than a
single company doing it... I'm fooked if I can !
You're expecting it to make sense? It's a religion after all.
 
T

The Wanderer

Sure, now you have 10 companies instead of 1, all with their own staff
/ pensions / finance depts to pay - not counting the seperation of the
old RECs into at least three companies each - all desperately trying
to offload responsibility and cost for anything they can elsewhere so
it doesn't affect their balance sheets.

See if you can work out how that is suddenly more efficient than a
single company doing it... I'm fooked if I can !
In the late 80's when privatisation was still to come, I can recollect
talking to quite a few members of the public who were always saying 'Just
wait till you lot are privatised, that'll bring improvements' or similar.
My reply was always 'We'll see. Perhaps we can have this conversation in a
few years.'

Surprising just how many far-sighted and long-serving employees at that
time were forecasting exactly the sorts of problems that now beset the
industry.

Thought for the day: Any industry that publishes standards of customer
service is tacitly acknowledging that it will struggle to meet those
standards.
 
A

Andy Hall

Thought for the day: Any industry that publishes standards of customer
service is tacitly acknowledging that it will struggle to meet those
standards.
Very true.

Those who really do achieve it, don't need to market their customer
service. Their customers assume it and get it.
 
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T

The Wanderer

It sounds like a concentric (for PME) or split-concentric (for TN-S)
service cable to me. This is the sort of thing
http://www.batt.co.uk/products/index.asp?area=2&p1=20&p2=26&p3=616

It does look superficially like SWA, but doesn't have the steel
armouring since it relies on the concentric construction (and fuses!)
for protection.
There are several arrangements it could be.

It could be a 3ph armoured cable to a wall box with undereaves in pvc or
pbj.

It could be a 3ph concentric which splits out to 1ph concentric using heat
shrink fittings.

It could be an aerial service which is looped undereaves using pvc or pbj.

It could be........

As the OP appears not to have revisited this thread to clarify some of the
points put to him, we're unlikely to know one way or the other. Which does
leave me asking why did he bother asking in the first place?
 
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T

The Wanderer

Please don't email. Reply in group. Others may be following this thread.
Primerily because the answer hasn't been given.
That's because you haven't given enough information to be able to advise
you properly.
I wasnt interested in the cables construction and knew that it WAS the
electricity's incoming mains off the street.
But there is a *possible* safety issue. That's why I asked on 28th April

"Does the cable look fairly modern, does it look like it's pvc sheathed or
does it appear to have a woven fabric outer layer?"

"If it's pvc sheathed, it shouldn't be a problem to work around it provided
you tak eproper care. If it looks like it has the woven fabric outer layer,
call the local distribution co and tell them you think you have some very
old (like 60+ years) lead in cables where you want to work."
"Would you think I had cause to get in touch with the electric supplier to
reroute it from the ground up on the neighbours side of the property?"
I quote from my initial reply

"Is it a problem for you to have the cables routed to next door
undereaves?"
I was looking for an anwser to this question more so.
Doesn't that depend on *your* answer to my question?

The ball's in your court.

If you want help from someone who worked all his life in the industry, you
have to give me the information to give you a considered answer.

If you want to make out that you haven't had a proper answer to your
enquiry, so be it. It's your loss, not mine.
 

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